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  2. MaxSwell

    Greetings from Napa, CA

    Welcome back to the asylum. You just could not live with out the insanity these machines induce!? I do love the white, even though it's not the fastest color. Proves you have great taste in mc's.
  3. MaxSwell

    Hello... Again

    Welcome to the asylum. We like to have a picture so we can be sure you are not a figment of our imagination. Good luck with your overhaul. And I think you live in one of the best places for mc riding. I love it there. At times it's like being on another planet. Moab to Zion via Lake Powel; Moab to Green River ,WY. Among the best roads I've ridden. Over. And. Over. And. Over. Not to mention the fabulous National Parks there too.
  4. MaxSwell

    Back on a VFR!!

    Welcome back to the asylum. You just could not live without the insanity!? That is a great looking example and in the fastest color. You obviously have great taste in mc's.
  5. Today
  6. JoelF

    Estimated labor to R&R transmission?

    If you are paying for labor IMO a used engine/trans assembly would be a better value as it can just be bolted in with no particular skill or ability. Probably find an engine for $350-$450 if you are patient or a whole running parts bike for $500-ish.
  7. thtanner

    Connector gets hot!

    No reason for it to be there really, the fuse is the important part anyways. Bypassing the stock wiring to the regulator would go a long way to avoid the weak stock wiring, though. After he repairs this, it would be on my list. In fact, if I were to buy another pre-2014 VFR it would be the absolute first thing I did to it. SH847 + roadster wiring kit
  8. jstehman

    Connector gets hot!

    Is there any drawback to just eliminating the small connector? It looks like Honda made it plug and play for ease of assembly on the line. Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
  9. megatronousprime

    Connector gets hot!

    Im trying to understand what you're saying. Youre telling us to use a 40 amp fuse?
  10. thtanner

    Level 7 (racing spoiler alert)

    Yea no, keep this forum to 8gen stuff please. This is not your Facebook wall. You are aware all posts appear in the activity feed, regardless of sub-forum. Your need to be seen will still be fulfilled.
  11. mello dude

    Connector gets hot!

    For any fuse holder use a MetriPack 40 amp as in the link below., get the 12 gauge. -- I like to build up my own with 10 gauge.. if that is an option, but you need a very good crimper. http://www.cycleterminal.com/fuse-boxes.html
  12. GatorGreg

    Level 7 (racing spoiler alert)

    Alex: “I’ll allow GatorGreg’s post here in the 8th gen subforum since the racing subforum is effectively dead - and I commend GatorGreg for having the wherewithal to post this information in a place where it will actually be seen” 😀
  13. megatronousprime

    Connector gets hot!

    Hello Everyone --I just ran into the same problem again since I changed out the fuse holder last season on my 2007 RWB--melted 30 amp fuse holder and burnt 14 gauge wire from small connector that was melting also --I plan on installing the new marine grade fuse holder with 12 gauge wire and cut out the other little connector thats melting too and replace that 14guage wire with 12 gauge, same as the fuse holder then install the new fuse holder inline--what do you guys think about that? BTW, my RWB only has 16k miles on it. Any advice is appreciated!
  14. The grease goes into the gap between piston and bore and helps prevent grunge getting to the seals. Also helps prevent corrosion of the pistons themselves. Those there are 30,000 miles 10 month p.a. use in Scotland and as clean as a whistle underneath the grease, after annual fettles. It's difficult to apply a thinner coating due to the consistency of the grease. VFR750 has it right - wipe excess.
  15. BiKenG

    5th & 6th VFR 800 Header build

    Oh yes. No question. But that doesn't necessarily mean it works any better.
  16. I also only took a quick look as I don't know much about EFI mods, but what is really interesting is that in addition to not needing a computer MAP, thay say that you can rent a diagnostic tool from them for $20 that allows you to troubleshoot and fine tune. They say that that you do not need a dyno. http://www.techlusion.com/dobeck-SAFR-tool.asp I just noticed that they have a youtube channel and that may be a good starting point. https://www.youtube.com/user/TuningHQ/playlists Ahh! I just found some Q&A on their site where they compare Power Commander and the other competition to their product. http://www.techlusion.com/EFI-controllers.asp http://www.techlusion.com/dobeck-FAQ.asp?#DPvsPOWERCOMMANDER At this point it's all "Greek" to me until I do some study. Do these EFI modification modules really make any difference if you have a standard exhaust system? Ross
  17. Duc2V4

    Back on a VFR!!

    Welcome back! I would look into Ram Mount, they have plenty of mounting options, I use a perch mount combined with an "X" grip on my 6 Gen and it works well. I have the phone mounted vertically and even on the bumpiest of roads I have not had any issues with it slipping out. https://www.rammount.com/part/RAM-B-174-UN7U
  18. Duc2V4

    Rocks don’t Rock

    This happened to a friend of mine. We were coming back from a trip to Central California and he hit what looked like a mini boulder (Yeah, slight exaggeration) but it was the rear wheel. I was literally on the same line coming around a corner when I saw the rock and then him hit it. He was lucky not to go down as it lifted his rear end up! We were able to get down the hill but he was losing air on the way down. The leak was slow but steady and he was able to get from Ojai to Orange County by stopping for air along the way. I've been lucky in that the small rocks I've hit were more like dirt clogs and not the real hard ones that don't break apart when you hit them. @Lee 2002, those look like the .5 oz weights that I use, so that looks like 2.5 oz on there. I've had some wheels take about 8 of these! When I get to the point of placing a wheel on the balance stand and it pendulums like mad, I will just break the bead and rotate the tire, sometimes this helps but sometimes not. I had one used Dunlop that I mounted for a friend and wow! just about everything I tried, I could not get the wheel to be calm when putting it on the balance stand. I think I ended up with 7 or 8 that time. I just put on a used Pirelli Super Corsa on a wheel and had to do the tire rotate thing. I think the wear of the tire makes it more uneven and makes re-mounting a little trickier.
  19. sPOTO

    Hello... Again

    The VFR requires some attention as it has been stored and hasn't been ridden in a few years. Going to replace all coolant, fuel and brake lines. Upgrade the suspension and mount new tires. I would love to ride this year, but it just won't happen. Hope to see you out there next season.
  20. Duc2V4

    Greetings from Napa, CA

    Welcome back! I do like the VFR in white. I also like the Stormtrooper helmet! Almost bought one for a spare but used the money to buy a new water pump and silicone coolant hoses instead!
  21. Hmm, sounds interesting. Doing a cursory look at their site it appears that rather than having a computer to setup the tuning, they use "pots" to adjust the fueling. Just like their web site says, they make it work like a carburetor. Personally, I would do some google searching and see if you can find any customer reviews. ADJUSTING THE POTS Green Fuel Pot: (functions like a fuel mixture screw and pilot jets on a carburetor) Adjusts for the motorcycle's fuel requirements during light load operation, from idle through highway cruising speeds and steady throttle, at or below the rpm set by your rpm pot. We have found that manufacturers have generally leaned out the fuel mixtures for emissions to a specific rpm (see below). To set this pot, make sure the motorcycle is up to a full operating temperature, then while in neutral, pick a fast idle that is not easy to hold a steady rpm (V-twins 1800-2200 rpm and multiple cylinders 2500-3000 rpm), hold the throttle at that spot and then slowly and evenly turn the green pot clockwise from its minimum setting, while listening to the exhaust sound. You should hear the exhaust sound change form an irregular and uneven sound to an even and smooth one. You may also see an increase in rpm as you increase fuel, and if you continue to increase fuel past this point to where the revs start to fall back away, then you can stop and start returning the pot screw back to a point half way between where the exhaust sound first smoothed out and the point where the highest rpm starts to fall away. Yellow Fuel Pot: (functions like an accelerator pump - needle and slide on a carburetor) This fuel adjustment adds fuel into the fuel map whenever the throttle is opened rapidly. This pot needs to be adjusted from test riding, by performing brisk roll-ons in a specific gear, and by always starting at the exact same rpm. Try one clock position increases between roll-on tests until you can't feel any more improvement, and then go back to the last setting that improvement was noticed. Some models won't require as much fuel as others, so while increasing the yellow by one clock position increments if the motorcycle starts to decrease in throttle response, then turn the yellow back one and a half clock positions Red Fuel Pot: (functions like a main jet on a carburetor) This fuel adjustment adds fuel under large load conditions and is generally required when either air intake or quality exhaust system changes occur. This addition happens automatically using our unique load sensing technology, and similar to the road test procedure listed above in yellow fuel, test riding while increasing red fuel will find an optimum setting. RPM Switch Pot: All (except Harley/Metric V-twins) Sets the rpm that the green fuel turns off. This adjustment is achieved by setting the pot to 4:30 o'clock for 600cc and above multi cylinder sport bikes. Each clock position of this pot equates to about 1000 rpm's, so 4,500 rpm's would be half way between 4 and 5 o'clock. Verify this setting by revving the bike in neutral and watching for the green light to go out at the chosen rpm.
  22. Hello all Haven't been on the forums here for a while, since I sold my 2007 25th VFR in 2011. Didn't have a bike until I purchased this 2015 Deluxe a few weeks ago. It had 1,600 miles on it, so its broken in and essentially new. I look forward to lurking and reading all the knowledge here. Keep the rubber side down all.
  23. Several years ago, I started taking apart my '99 with the intent of replacing the shift forks and second gear. (When I'd shift into second gear and accelerate, it would skip a tooth, but just once. Like if I rode in second gear for a while, accelerating and braking, it would not skip a tooth more than once. It wasn't a deal breaker, but I wanted it fixed, so I started on it myself.) Fast forward to the present, and the bike is partially disassembled on a lift in my basement. The swingarm is off and the motor is about ready to be dropped. But since it's been so long since I messed with it, I kind of just felt like paying someone to finish it up. A highly-recommended local guy who runs a small shop came by to take a look at it. I initially wanted to just have it repaired in my basement (since it's on a lift with the parts all around it) but he wanted to take it back to his shop. He got back to me with a quote for $1100-$1300 for labor, and said that he expected it to take about 20 hours. (I'm guessing that the shop rate is around $65/hour. We're in rural southern Illinois, so not paying city prices.) That number seems high to me. Ten years ago, I had transmission issues on my '01 GSX-R600 track bike. I literally dropped the motor and R&Red the transmission three times before I finally got everything replaced that needed to be. The first time took me about a day and a half--probably 12-14 hours. The third time, I had the whole project done in under 8 hours. I don't feel like the VFR is a whole lot more challenging than the Gixxer was--surely this isn't more than a 10-12 hours job. So, what do you guys think--approximately how many hours of labor should there be in R&Ring the transmission on a fifth-gen?
  24. Tiutis

    Picture Thread

    Looks like the Ducati Supersport. Looks good!
  25. Stray

    5th & 6th VFR 800 Header build

    RVFR, my 5th Gen is a1997. Must have been one of the first off the production line (Irish import I think, as it came in KPH rather than MPH). Do do you think it looks better than Delkevic? There’s a Motad system on eBay too. These are no longer made as company went bust.
  26. Stray

    Rapidbike Evo And Racing Related Questions !

    Thanks Mohawk. It’s a 4.9 for sure. Will have to take a punt on one of the 4.9 variants and see how it goes. I think the the only variable is cable length. You can get some with motorsport connectors but MTB uses the standard automotive plug. Thanks again Mohawk.
  27. Stray

    5th & 6th VFR 800 Header build

    VFROZ, I’m not a fluid dynamics expert so I ask out of pure curiosity: does it matter which downpipes are linked together? I know it’s best to alternate the pulses at the link (you don’t want both pulses getting to the link at the same time as they’d collide and impede flow) but is there a reason to pair left and right rather than front and back? I believe the best way to achieve smooth linking is to make one pipe slightly longer than the other so the pulses enter the link at different times, although you also need to consider firing order too. Thats why race headers have some downpipes with more severe curls than others - the really curly one is the longer downpipe. If you’re trimming air/fuel mixture with an O2 sensor for each bank of cylinders then splitting front and rear is best as I believe the rear cylinders run richer than the front. On OEM pipes the O2 sensor is picking up a mix of rich rear and lean front cylinder. On the Lextek your O2 sensor only picks up the two rich rear cylinders or two lean front cylinders. The Lextek gives better scope for tuning, no? On the other hand the stock ECU probably only has a single stoich setting. So getting one lean reading sensor (front) and one rich reading sensor (rear) will drive it mad. Conclusion: if you’re running a fuelling module (Rapid Bike, PC or Bazzaz, for instance) with per-cylinder tuning then you want a front/back split header. If you’re running the OEM system with two probes then you want the more balanced left/right split header. Have I messed this theory up? Does anything I say make sense any more? Again, please forgive my ignorance - I’m genuinely curious. Stray
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