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  1. Here is my recently purchased vfr. Love this thing. Just found the forum, will be perusing for this upcoming seasons riding. Cheers.
    11 points
  2. Hello again fellow Vifferini! Some of you may have read my long winded story here of getting back on a VFR after a 15 year absence from riding. I then posted the clean up thread here about that bike. Since purchase I have put about 10,000 miles on it having an absolute blast riding around the fine state of Utah, USA. The warm weather season is short but we do have a handful of excellent roads with endless scenery. The bike is set up just like my first VFR and it runs perfect. I couldn't be happier with it. Well, the plot thickens...which is to say I tracked down and bought back my original VFR. The one that I bought new in Northern California back in 2001. Yes, my actual exact bike, VIN #00089. Turns out the internet can be an interesting and effective tool. I actually got in touch with the owner a couple years ago but he wasn't ready to sell at that time. Finally, in recent weeks he let me know that he had upgraded and would sell it back to me, and at a very reasonable price. I was more than pleased, and my teenage son and I made plans to pick it up two states away in California. Not wanting to drag my small open trailer 1800 miles there and back, I wondered if a motorcycle would fit inside the wife's minivan. The Google machine quickly confirmed that I was not the first to consider this, as I found multiple pictures of various bikes shoehorned into spaces more commonly filled with soccer moms and soccer kids. That said, we had to test before the drive just to be sure. After some general measuring I figured that if we removed the windscreen and mirrors from my current VFR, we might be able to load it through the side door, which is exactly what we did. "Easy does it. Left a bit! Watch the ramp!" Success! Even got the doors to close with room to spare. Took it right back out and put it in the garage, neighbors shaking their heads, unsurprised at my usual shenanigans. So with that confirmed we made our way out to CA to pick up the original machine. Let me say this, one-on-one time with your kids is absolute gold. While going to get my old bike was cool, 20 plus hours in the car with my son was the real highlight of the trip. He's a fantastic kid and we had great time making new memories doing something that wouldn't make sense to most people. We arrived just after dark at the seller's home after a full day's drive. It was great to meet the gentleman and trade a few stories. I pointed out the small scratches on the clutch cover. "Yeah, that was me, trying to put it up on the center stand one day wearing flip flops and it slowly went over on it's side on the driveway. Not my first bonehead move." It was so cool to see that it still had every mod that I had installed more than 20 years prior, save the Sargent seat, but I'll just use the one from my other bike now. Looking over the bike further I noticed that he had the db killer installed on the Staintune, something I never used in my ownership. "Have you heard it without the db killer?" I asked, reaching for my set of Allen keys. "I didn't know you could remove it." he said. A few seconds later I had it out and fired up the bike inside his carport. Let it warm up for a bit and then gave it a few mild revs. "Whoa you can't have it now!!" he said jokingly, "I should have removed that a long time ago!" We both got a laugh. Every VFR guy has their favorite pipe, an uncorked Staintune is mine, though a period Micron is a close second. The Staintune look and sound just can't be matched. I removed the windscreen and mirrors, having done this exercise once before, and we loaded up the bike in the minivan. I strapped it down securely using the factory seat anchors and several ratchet straps. It was almost as if the van was made for this type of thing. We journeyed back home and put the bike in the garage, with some new memories and a new chapter to start. Seeing double, this looks familiar. The more recent left, modded to resemble the original, right. It even has my original plate on the back as plates stay with the vehicle in California. So what now? Get organized, make the punch list. Gotta go over everything to see that it is clean and up to spec. Fluids, charging system, brakes, etc, a nice winter project. The seller provided me with some receipts of maintenance he'd had done recently at a shop near his home. New plugs, valves checked (all in spec), new coolant and brake fluids. Mentioned an issue of stumbling in lower revs that the shop couldn't rectify. Also mentioned a slight coolant leak on the left side and a dent in the left radiator. Interesting but no worries, I have time to look over everything and make it right. When I sold the bike in 2006 it had 26,000 miles on it. Now it shows just 39,000 miles. I can live with that. In general it looks to be in decent shape still, just needing to be gone through a bit. I first removed the side fairings to have a look at things underneath. Hmmm...of the 18 or so fasteners I removed, only 3 were correct and all were finger tight or less. Luckily you can still order the correct ones from Honda. It's clearly been down on the left side at some point. The coolant leak is from an epoxy repair attempt at the bottom of the reservoir. Actually glad to see it's not from the engine casing as the reservoir is easy to replace. Odd repair though. The left rad is indeed dented on the bottom and the bracket bent slightly, though it is not leaking. It will work until I can get another one. When I removed the tail fairing some of the tool kit fell out of the left side, clanging onto the garage floor, and there is a small crack on the left of the tail fairing at the franken bolt insert. Yeah, it's definitely been down. But....(and it's a big but), whomever dropped it did put on an OEM side fairing so that's a win, and everything else I can deal with quite easily. I also took a chance to check voltage and saw 13.70ish at idle and a solid 14.44v at 4,000 rpm, right where it should be as far as I understand. I'll keep an eye on things once I start riding it later. I made a list and ordered a bunch of fasteners and a new coolant reservoir, OEM oil filters and fluids. Just going to take my time and enjoy it. More to come. Cheers, Justin
    11 points
  3. ...I bought this lightly used 2 year old VFR750, and haven't been without a Honda since then; several VFRs and a handful of VTR1000F. I'd bought the bike late that afternoon, and being early March it was a dark, damp first ride to visit my folks. I'd love to have it back, and in that condition.
    11 points
  4. On Friday I bought this 1993 vfr 750. Unbeknown to me, it's a 4th gen 93. I love the sound of that V4 singing And the raspberry pearl black is perfect to me.
    5 points
  5. Well, the motorcycle show is here in Toronto this weekend. Debating on whether to go or not. Do I waste $20 on parking and $22 to get in. I always leave disappointed. But since I'm a gear head I need my fix of being around motorcycles. Last year with Kawasaki and other manufacturers missing the show was sad. I left the show thinking If i brought my storm trooper VFR and placed it on a stand it would have been one of the best looking bikes there. LOL. Motorcycling in Canada is a becoming a joke especially how many bikes we do not get here in Canada as opposed to Europe.
    5 points
  6. Wow, got my pillion cowl from sixdog today...its firkin Beautiful!
    5 points
  7. I just added another Hawk to the fleet. Built my first one. bought this one. 700cc engine. Couldn't afford NOT to buy it.
    5 points
  8. Alright misfits, time be now for another group ride. Due to the time of year, and considering some riders may be tiring of Mines Road, I suggest another coast ride. (always up for alternative routes if anybody cares to suggest one.) Weather permitting, February 24, 2024 we meet at Starbucks, 260 Northgate Drive, San Rafael 94903. We ride over to Pt. Reyes Station and up the Pacific Coast Hwy. Lunch in Elk, and back down CA128 to Cloverdale. We top off the ride at the world famous Hamburger Ranch; those up for more fun can continue on CA128 to Calistoga and Winters. The last time we tried this ride did not work out so well, so let's hope for clear weather and decent roads. If the weather is questionable, we'll cancel; nobody wants another soaking like we took last time. But you never know, this time of year in Northern California could make for a memorable ride. Hope so. Kickstands up at 8:30 AM. Hope you can make it. Jeff J.
    4 points
  9. A tiny big update. I wanted to do this for a long time but there is not alot of options for keeping this priced within my budget - untill I realized this was something you could buy as bolt on mod for ducatis. So one week later my panigale bolt on cover arrived and it turned out perfect. I wanted make this as low profile as possible so I had to move the filler neck inwards. The ring is welded on the outside and the neck from the inside. This makes me able to inspect the clutch and watch it rotate with ease! You see it's kind of a hassle to remove the clutch cover as the supercharger pulley is glued, the belt needs tensioning and of course the right fairing needs to come of. Now it's a 10 minute job to change the clutch. If someone know how to remove the text on the anodized ring id like to know how without having to re-anodize the whole ring. It's not engraved and it's on top of the anodozing.
    4 points
  10. Understanding how an air box works and the reasons why a stock box is a safer bet... If you have ever had the gas tank off your late-model sportbike, you will notice that the front of the fuel tank doesn’t hold fuel; it holds an airbox. In the old days, when you bought a new bike, it had an air-filter case attached to feed the carburetors or the fuel-injection intakes. All the sharp, young guys would immediately rip off the filter case and replace it with four sock filters. Reduced airflow resistance. Much better performance. One day in the late 1980s, they began to rip off the airboxes of their new bikes and their engines fell on their faces. They lost a bunch of performance. “This can’t be happening! Putting on sock filters always worked before.” But it turns out the industry found a way to boost performance by making what is known as a resonant airbox. We have all in an idle moment blown across the mouth of a beer bottle and heard the "whoooo" of the bottle resonance. As air goes across the mouth of the bottle, it creates a low pressure, which causes air to flow up. That deflects the air away from the mouth of the bottle. Then the air goes back in, the airflow from your mouth goes back across, and the cycle repeats, rapidly fluttering and producing that deep tone. The compressible air in the bottle is acting as a spring, and the slug of air in the neck of the bottle is the mass that vibrates against that spring. This intake airbox from a fuel injected Honda is just a glorified beer bottle. Instead of the engine blowing across the mouth of it, its four throttle bodies are sucking from the box, pulling its pressure down. Air rushes in through the ducts in the fairing to fill up that low pressure. The next cylinder sucks the bottle pressure down and more air rushes in and restores the pressure. If the volume of the box and the mass of the air in the intake pipes are correctly chosen, the box will hum like the beer bottle. The trick is to get your engine to draw air from the box when the pressure is up and then the box refills when the pressure is down. And that is why ripping the airboxes off and putting on old-time sock filters resulted in a reduction in performance. In a specific zone of rpm, a resonant airbox can boost your engine’s torque by 10 percent. That’s worth having! My friend Stephen called long distance from England because he just installed a $900.00 HRC air box on his RC45 and saw 120HP on the dyno... mmmmm... together we wondered if the stock box be modified??? We found that stock RC45 throttle bodies are 46mm but the air box was restricted to 40mm... no problem... I'll bore the air box out to 47mm on the milling machine... I drew up plans for 47mm bell mouth based on the stock 40mm bell mouths and purchased a block of black Delrin... I'm not happy doing repetitious work but I labored long hours to machine 4 each bell mouths with my best accuracy... Don't you love when a plan comes together especially if it turns out perfect??? Now I had an unrestricted air box with my own 47mm bell mouths... it was the best I could do to replicate HRC $900.00 air box... not to mention I wanted to keep my home made K&N filter... Time to put the Mod to the test on the dyno... this is Dave at Chandelle Motorsports... No joy... I lost 1.8HP on the dyno... so bigger is not better in this case... a whole week worth of work shot down in flames... it seems Honda got the intake velocity right for a stock pipe after all... air boxes are like tuned instruments... alter the holes and the tune just makes sour notes and power suffers... Mr.RC45 fueling is not the problem... my air box will remain stock because our air box works like a finely tuned instrument... any wild ass guess mod disrupts this highly engineered resonant to where to you're producing nothing but sour notes... The airbox inlet tubes, or “horns”, are specifically designed to provide a resonance that can increase the total airflow by up to 10-15%. Second guessing these can cause the engine to loose power and increase the intake noise as in my case... RC45's stock intake horns are there for homologation purposes only and do not directly feed into the airbox only the HRC intakes feed ram air into the airbox...
    4 points
  11. LEDs are such a cheap, easy and effective mod. Highly recommended. You only need 5 for the backlights in the cluster. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08229N2Y5/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Did a test spot with the polisher. I first used a rubber wheel on a drill to remove this old decal, then lightly hit the area with 2000 grit wet sand, followed by an initial pass of Ultimate Compound on an orange pad. Turned out nice. Before polishing: After:
    4 points
  12. Yeah, "Powersports" is the word for many motorcycle dealers now, particularly the non-cruiser ones. But hey, Honda still creates some cool bikes! Johann Zarco's LCR Honda bike was just revealed, and as an RC-51 rider I just love the livery. (apologies for the hijack)
    4 points
  13. Perhaps they could help you write the apology letter for messing with us
    4 points
  14. I'd start afresh and shout it new sprockets and chain, along with all the normal maintenance items, fluids, plugs, air filter, oil and filter etc. I'd also dive into the electrics, solder up all the grounds in the dreaded orange earth block, solder the stator lead wires to the R/R and its output connector, upgrade the R/R if needed and make good the Main Fuse B 30amp fuse holder and wiring. I did most of this last winter, just after I got the bike, also went through the front end ( bushings, dust seals, rotors pads ) and settled on Race tech springs and rates suggested by the Capt. ( one of the best things I could have done, what a difference in the front end ) also tore down the motor to the cams and checked all the valves, surprised to find they were within spec, removed the PAIR system while I was in there, rebuilt the clutch slave cylinder and flushed all the old brake fluid out ( clutch and brakes ), had the injection system cleaned and replaced all the water cooling hard line O rings etc., surprised how bad they were, also new thermostat, I would never have guessed it by running the motor but the old one was stick wide open, new coolant, plugs etc This winter I want to check out and update the rear systems such as chains and sprockets, I doubt I will pull the rear axle system as it rotates fine for chain adjustments and the bearings seem good I like to think I have had a lot of different bikes over the years but this 99 is better feeling than even the 90 VFR750 I have, a keeper for sure
    4 points
  15. In fairness i didnt take anything said badly. Grum is correct that i dont know much about these bikes so good to have things pointed out. I have noticed a few other things myself too but its a great bike. Love riding her so thats all that matter 😁
    4 points
  16. I'm not sure about reliability - my 6th gen seems to eat stators like potato chips at a Super Bowl party. The 6th gen's is larger diameter, 4.52" vs 4.26" on the 5th gen, about 6.1% larger. IDK how much more power that translates in to. The yellow output wires for both measure 2.2mm outer diameter around the yellow insulation, so the same. Custom Rewind, below, put 2.9mm OD wire on my 6th gens, so a big improvement. If anyone is wondering, Custom Rewind is still in business. I talked to them about a week ago. They did my 6th gen's 1st rewind and it was great. Cost now is $135 shipped back to you. Phone is 205-798-7282. 2014 Pratt Hwy, Birmingham, AL. 35214 If you leave a message they will eventually call you back. They will give you a custom length wire and whatever connector you specify. Probably should call them 1st before asking for the latter.
    4 points
  17. So here is my electric water pump installed. Second pic shows main coolant flow with Yellow arrows same on diagram. Orange arrows show T-stat (Thermostat) circuit that allows heated coolant from head to be circulated by the water pump to the T-stat until warm enough to open the T-stat. Once T-stat opens main yellow flow takes over. Diagram shows location of my 25mm to 11mm (IIRC) T-piece hose joiner in the lower rad return hose to allow T-stat to be retained with the electric pump which only has an inlet & outlet for the main flow. Not a perfect solution but it works. Hope that all makes sense 👍
    4 points
  18. My 5G gasket(s) finally came in, which gave me the confidence to remove the 5G stator from its cover. I got to measuring the differences between the 5th and 6th gen versions, and it would seem that about the only similarity between them is that the inner mounting diameters and bolt patterns are the same. That's where it ends. I'll lay out the measurements I took below, using a digital slide caliper. Some of the measurements could be made accurately and repeatably, but others were somewhat guesses where the wire wrapped around each of the poles. It probably requires an electrical engineer with familiarity of these types of alternators to definitively say whether this makes a difference to power potential at various RPM's of each - definitely beyond my ability. I measured in inches - apologies to metric folks, but you get the idea. 5G 6G Inner mounting circumference 1.65 1.65 Outer circumference 4.23 4.54 Core thickness 1.05 .89 Height of pole(s) above core .84 .90 Width of each pole 1.40 1.30 Depth of pole .54 .59 The last 3 measurements took some estimating. The wiring obscures the true measurement, so I did my best to keep it consistent. The last item is interesting. The core appears to be a stack of plates vs a solid block of machined or cast metal. The 5th gen clearly has thicker ones. I used a fine dental pick to drag over each , counting each click as it slid across. The 5G core had a count of 22, and the 6G a count of 46. I could be off by a few - regardless it's quite noticeable just looking at it. But does that make any difference to the power potential of the stator? My intuition says no, but if not then why would Honda make such a significant change? Lastly, the 4 mounting bolts are significantly different length. I put the 6G core in the 5G cover and ran the bolts down by hand. Something seemed odd as I encountered resistance from the bolts but the core had play in it relative to the cover. Be careful if doing this swap and using the 5G bolts - with the 6G thinner core, shorter bolts will be required or the result could be stripped threads in the cover. In summary, the 6th gen stator is larger diameter, thinner, with poles (both have 18) that are taller but narrower. Possibly this allows for more wraps of wire which might be helpful - not sure. At any rate, it's not clear to me what this swap might accomplish. My real interest is in improving output at idle, as voltage going down the road is a steady 14.5v. It's mostly at stops particularly when the fan is running that things go south and I see low 12's for voltage. I am running an 847 R/R, so it's not OEM. If there's anyone that definitively knows if the differences in two stators would produce different results, it would be great to hear. Cheers
    3 points
  19. Yep. Seems like I do. Even pissed at myself.
    3 points
  20. We have a member here that goes by Throttlepimp. His name is Kevin Sigler, he does graphic design and has been creating and fabbing gauge faces and decals for a long time. He's supplied all my decal and gauge face mods for my business and bike projects for almost 15yrs. Countless transactions with nothing but good results - including a set of gauge faces for a second gen VFR like yours to replace sun faded ones. He's not on here much, so shoot him an email at throttlepimp@gmail.com. Tell him you are a VFRD member, and that I sent you. He already has files and color match for your gauges saved from my project. Customizing a face for your voltmeter will be very easy for him.
    3 points
  21. that's 24 years old??? I swear I bought my '98 brand new just a few... uh... shoot, that was a little while back, wasn't it.
    3 points
  22. Exhaust system, fresh linkage, rebuilt Fox installed. Disassembled the clutch, scuffed and cleaned the metals, installed new EBC springs. Installed the serviced starter motor.
    3 points
  23. Ricks's has stator cover gaskets. They're $13. I'm running one on my '98 with a Rick's stator. https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Honda-Stator-Cover-Gasket-25_109
    3 points
  24. Well I went to the show. I'm addicted to the drug they call motorcycles. It was sad once again. No new motorcycles except maybe Suzuki GSXS8r. Only positive bought a new REVIT summer riding jacket. Honda stand was sad. No new bikes except for CBR 650r eclutch. Poor Honda. Where is the Honda CB1000 hornet or Yamaha XSR 900GP? We get squat. Only positive , I own one of the best all around motorcycles ever made. Ride safe everyone riding season is getting close.
    3 points
  25. Thanks Grum. It is a fun and somewhat mysterious project so far. Today I began cleaning things up. Took the rest of the body work off to inspect and wash inside and out. The fairings came out nice. I will machine polish all of the plastics before they go back on. Always interesting to see factory markings on the inside of things. Found more evidence of the left side drop, the gauge cluster is cracked on the lower left mount. I just took it out and super glued it back together. Luckily just the housing was cracked that I can see. Everything else looks ok. Took the opportunity to put LEDs in the backlighting slots as done on my other bike. That needle indicated 155 mph exactly once with me at the helm, in Death Valley around 2002. Actual speed would have been somewhere in the 140s but it was all she had. Still faster than my buddies Ducati 900SS at the time. We were headed to Las Vegas for Ducati Revs America. Ironically, after doing some top speed runs out in the desert we both got pulled over just outside of Vegas for doing 20 over. Found two more missing fasteners, and a lonely zip tie in place of one. The excess wasn't even snipped off. What kind of neanderthal put this bike back together? lol Just taking my time, trying to make a difference... Chain and sprockets are recent so they can stay. Little by little. Cheers, Justin
    3 points
  26. Mileage is a loose standard because wear depends on so many variables... A more accurate standard of chain wear is after the 3rd adjustment because that is undeniable evidence that the factory installed grease is beginning to fail to lube the critical pin roller junction hidden behind the X ring... the length of the chain is growing because of this metal to metal wear... I can not call a chain serviceable that is grinding metal... it's like saying that a dry bearing that runs ruff is acceptable... the net result is another 2 to 3% drop in RWHP as more energy is lost grinding metal behind the X ring... This is what we don't see behind the X rings... metal to metal wear every time we adjust the chain that eats into our engine's available HP... a new pin measures 206.5 and wears down to 205.5 at the 8K mile mark... looks good to the naked eye but multiply that 1 thousand of an inch times 108 links and you have 108 thousands of an inch wear or about the range of the green marks provided by Honda's wear gauge... 202.8 show the very visible wear at the 12K mile mark... the pins are turning red from extreme heat of grinding dry metal... a chain in this condition may consume up to 6 to 8% of our RWHP... not to mention it may snap into and cause case damage... Some manufactures provided a handy guide to monitor chain wear... stay with in the green and you'll be looking for a new chain and sprockets at the 8 to 10K mile mark... What we are lubing are external roller and between the roller and the sprockets (red area in my drawing)... we are not lubing the X rings nor behind the X rings so any oil applied in that effort is a waste and will only fling off... We are lubing the external roller and between the roller and the sprockets (red area in my drawing)... we are not lubing the X rings nor behind the X rings so any oil applied in that effort is wasted fling off...
    3 points
  27. After 3+ months outside (frost, snow..), took the tarp off, took her from the airtight bag, fitted the 6V battery, primed the carb, gave 2 kicks.... 20240217_134023.mp4
    3 points
  28. Carnaval ends tomorrow in the Netherlands, so I still wore "Oeteldonk" colors on my ride to work this morning 🙂
    3 points
  29. Take the calipers off and clean the pins, especially #13 Bet ya it will look like this...
    3 points
  30. You say "starter button not working" ! Is that a typo error? If not, then that's the fault, the wiring or switch needs repair or replacement! Here's the basic starter circuit diagram attached. Highlighted Red is the Positive Voltage feed for the Relay Coil the Green Highlighted is the Grounding side for the Relay Coil. - At Ignition Switch On, are all Indications, Lights, Fuel prime, Normal? - Have you confirmed Fuse D 10amp Starter Fuse is good? - Have you confirmed the Neutral Switch is working? Is your Neutral light on? - Have you tried a Sidestand Up, Clutch pulled in start? If you remove the red plug from the Starter Relay and probe the Red wire connector and the Yellow/red wire connector at the red plug you should have continuity provided the Ignition is On, the Fuse is ok, the Kill Switch is in RUN and the Starter Button is pressed. Another possibility is an open circuit Clutch Diode. But this will only effect a Neutral Start, Not the Sidestand Up, Clutch in Start. To verify your Starter Relay function, you could use a couple of test leads from the battery, remove the Red Plug from the relay then probe the test leads to where the Green/Red wire (Ground) and the Yellow/Red wire (Positive) would normally go to on the relay. Each time you make contact to the terminals the Starter Relay should energise and starter motor should run. MAKE SURE IF YOU DO THIS YOUR BIKE IS IN NEUTRAL AND PREFERABLY ON THE CENTER STAND. Let's know how you get on.
    3 points
  31. Hi Skids. Excellent advice already there for you. Just to add one more for a snippet of info. Any damage to the Molybdenum butterfly seal coating, will cause additional bypass air resulting in high uncontrollable idle. Bottom line is the main cause of Hi Idle is either the Wax Unit (or blocked coolant flow through it as mentioned), additional air into the throttle bodies (vaccumm hoses, throttle body mounting boots) or perhaps a dud TPS or ECT signal. Assume you don't have any Fi Flashing Codes. Terry raises a good key point here, if your idle very slowly returns to normal just relying on engine temperature heat soaking the WU then that is a good sign coolant flow through WU could be restricted or blocked, this could be within the WU itself or the hoses. Cheers.
    3 points
  32. Back to the bodywork, and based on advice from here I’d settled on the VF400/500 front with the VFR750 RC24 tail. Nice slim design with a narrow tail to match. Makes the bike look smaller/lighter/faster. This is the sexy image I had in mind: What I didn’t expect was a celebrity intervention that would derail my plans completely. Incensed at my lack of skill and direction, none less than the legendary Mohawk himself came to the house and chastened me with a lecture on aerodynamics, rear seat drag and aesthetics. Very sternly, loudly and in person. There was much finger pointing and violent gesticulation! As if not crushed enough, his missus then lectured me on cleanliness, organisation and the efficient use of garage space. Feeling suitably chastened, I couldn’t possibly argue with any of it. Mohawk has instructed me to build this: VF1000-F2 Bol d’Or front with MC21 tail piece. And if Mohawk says it must be so, then so it shall be. Who am I to refuse! It’s hard to visualise as the panels are different colours and not entirely in the right position. So here are some pics of the respective bits on other bikes for reference. VF1000-F2 front with minor modifications (Check out the saddle on the first one!): MC21 tail on a VF1000R: Still planning to have side fairings and a belly pan. These will be bodged up after the front fairing and seat are situated. Side vents possibly from a CBR600RR and maybe a NACA duct thrown in for fun. Let’s see how we get on…
    3 points
  33. Picos rally 2022 Pals stop for one another I suppose it is not unusual for a 69yr old to suffer incontinence occasisionally Nah , fitting 6mm tubing on a 8mm spout is just dumb. But, I had spare tubing in my doctor's case... 😁 Back into the groove, railing!
    3 points
  34. How about this one, it was 11 separate roundabouts and this is the current version
    3 points
  35. There were a lot of "grey imports" into the UK in the mid-late 1990s, and at the time, most European models only illuminated one of the headlights. So, unless you check your frame number, you may never know for sure if yours was grey imported into the UK where it was sold as "new". Or, you might just have a blown bulb! But if yours was a grey import, the grey importer would probably have fitted a UK-spec headlamp unit (to get the dip right), but may not have bothered to change the wiring to allow both bulbs to be used. Bikes which were factory-designed to have only one lamp illuminated on dip/low beam often lacked a lo-beam relay, as V4 Rosso mentioned. So if you do convert to use both bulbs, you should add a lo-beam relay. Otherwise, you WILL ruin your headlight switch, eventually. Honda 400cc grey imports had similar wiring issues, not from having only 1x 55w/60 H4, but from having 2x 35w/60 H4s. People used to throw in regular H4s, not realising that these bikes only had relays on the hi-beam side. Many fried headlight switches ensued... Ciao, JZH
    2 points
  36. If I were betting, I'd blame the dealership for doing something stupid before I'd blame Honda.
    2 points
  37. For those interested, Formula one teams did a lot of experimentation with velocity stacks in the 60ties. It was called air resonance charging if I remember correctly. The idea behind was that the air in a long stack with certain conical profile and diameter to length relation could be accelerated in the intake by resonance. There were even books in the engineering section of my school about it. I played with this many moons ago on my first underpowered car and limited funds. These were cool times
    2 points
  38. So i took delivery of the new bike yesterday and im over the moon. Such a lovely machine. I obviously had to go for a wee spin and since it was about 2 deg yesterday i was planning on sticking the heated grips on but to my suprise there were none! I thought the 8th gen came with these as standard? Not a major issue as i can fit some aftermarket ones. Anyway, couple of pics taken after delivery.
    2 points
  39. I have the Blueskysea B5M, it's about $130 USD off Ali Express. Here's an example video: I'll never go without a dashcam, when I was a new rider on my SV650 I installed the cam and literally the next day someone didn't see me in their blind spot, merged into me, I locked up and went down. We didn't actually come into contact, just came super freaking close - the guy pulled over, then just left. From the camera I made out his plate and showed it to the police, who ultimately charged him and I got his insurance to pay for full repairs (most of which I pocketed, really it was just a clutch lever, shifter, and some chinese fairings).
    2 points
  40. I always wanted one since working at the Honda shop starting in the early 90s. Got to ride them and work on them. Was just always waiting for the right one, in the right shape (solid bones, but not nice enough to demand all the money). Well the first came along and was the perfect candidate, and I got to do the mods I always wanted to do. Absolutely love it. The second one was exactly why I have multiple VFRs. Not actively pursuing, but opportunities present themselves that you just can't afford to let get away.
    2 points
  41. No issues, I’ve only done a few hundred miles but seems to be just fine using the 5g cover and 6g components.
    2 points
  42. If you see a driver in America...you'll not likely see them driving well. They stop for almost nothing here in Charlotte. No red lights. No stop signs. No yielding in rotaries. It's pretty grim. One of countless examples from yesterday on my first ride of the year ride. A newbie would have just ben squished. What does meathead's tiny penis truck and huge trailer rig weigh. 10k-20k pounds?
    2 points
  43. Hi Dutchy, nearly correct on the spelling mate it’s actually Roppongi (don’t worry I had to check myself) we went there a few years ago but not this year. I did partake of some sake last night actually, I tried a sampler selection and they were all very good, didn’t get drunk though.
    2 points
  44. They are not mutually exclusive. Both can be true.
    2 points
  45. I think the main reason I miss the RWB is the way the bike looks and colorway. Damn it was a beauty. Grum is right, the 8th Gen is a better machine. To me the 8th gen is slimmer and slightly lighter which overall makes me feel the bike is sportier. Brakes are way better and suspension is stiffer which is what I personally like. 8th gen is more responsive in the lower rev range. The VTEC transition is totally smoothed which I like. I think the RWB OEM exhaust was slightly louder than the 8th gen. A little less top end but I prefer the better throttle response especially at slower speeds where the 6th gen sometimes chugged around. 8th gen with improved electrics cures the one major flaw of the 6th gen that I never experienced. The 8th GEN is virtually indestructable and most bikes today pale in comparison to the VFR in quality of build and refinement.
    2 points
  46. Triumph forks now mounted with custom made tube's and modified internals to suit the extra length. These forks are nice and chunky 45mm with full preload, rebound and damping adjustment. Now if anyone has standard forks on a RC 24 in could do with the measurement from the bottom of the frame were the bottom yoke meets the frame to the center of the wheel spindle as i should have taken this measurement to aid setting up the new front end
    2 points
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