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Cogswell

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Cogswell last won the day on June 11

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About Cogswell

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    I need more power

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  • Location
    Portland, Oregon :(
  • In My Garage:
    1999 VFR
    2008 VFR ABS
    1995 VFR - gone but not forgotten

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  1. Ok, so the battery is good. A Battery Tender is sensitive to voltage, not the amperage that can be delivered. If the other items are eliminated other possible causes can be investigated.
  2. Regarding the battery - does "tests good" mean a load test or that you measured its voltage engine off? The former is more definitive of battery health than only voltage. Be sure of that before assuming anything else. An auto parts store can do the test for you. Re grounds, yes there is a connector in the harness on the left side with a ground that should be inspected. Also, under the tank near its hinge is a bolt with a collection of harness grounds. Separate from that is the main battery ground. The former can be accessed with battery cover removal and a M5 hex, the latter requires re
  3. I'm not going to touch the viscosity debate - each can do their own for their own reasons. However, FWIW when I ran either a 10-30 or for a time 0-40 vs 10-40 (all 3 Mobil 1) in the 6th gen, I noticed a marked increase in the amount of magnetic swarf on the magnetic drain plug I use. The biggest difference was with 0-40. There was no way to objectively measure it other than visual inspection - with the 10-40 there is consistently a thin smear on the magnet and with the other 2 I found a significant blob hanging on, maybe the size of a small pea. I didn't have to eyeball it - I noticed it
  4. Thank you sir! If you know of an example of the type referenced, that would be helpful. The compact DC breakers don't seem to specify anything about arc supression, just voltage and ampetage ratings and that they are thermally tripped. Due to size limitations, it will probably have to do - they just barely fit - anything larger won't work.
  5. Danno, Any downside to using a manual breaker vs the midi fuse? My main thought is that the fuses are one less thing to carry and are limited in number. The breaker can be reset as necessary. It does appear to be bulkier though, and on a 6th gen saying that space around the battery is limited is an understatement.
  6. I had to do the same with wood for spacers. Just the nature of going the custom route - some fitting and adjusting is to be expected.
  7. While I had the airbox recently off, with WOT looking down the intake runners it was clear to see there's carbon built up on the backs of the intake valves. Nothing like what one would see on a GDI engine, but I'd prefer that they be as clean as possible. What I've seen so far is that much of the products out there for that purpose are sprays introduced in to the intake air that flows down on to the back of the valves during operation. That would be easy to do using the PAIR port (mine's blocked off) or similar. I am however very leery of spray solvents damaging the coating on the throttle
  8. Likewise - the more I'm learning about these the less appealing they are. It seems illogical to reset a c/b before discovering and correcting the reason it was tripped. Maybe substituting an inline 30A maxi fuse is the way to go.
  9. The auto resets are supplied with the Roadster Cycle kits pre-installed in the wiring. I found some info from a vendor of the breakers, below. I suppose since it's protecting the output from the R/R, the odds of it tripping are low. It would be easy enough to clip the auto-reset out and spice in a fuse block or some type of manual breaker. God knows there was plenty of wire for that in the kit. Just seems strange that there would be no way to know that it's tripped. https://www.delcity.net/store/12V-Auto-Reset-Circuit-Breakers/p_198669.h_198846
  10. There are some mounts that go in the steering stem - just pry off the black cap. Ram mounts seem to be popular. IIRC there's a member on the board that makes a stem mount - maybe someone knows who that is.
  11. From the members I've seen here that needed new front wheel bearings they had seen more than occasional rain. Washing a bike with profuse amounts of water the way one would bathe a car is probably also not good for bearing's longevity and by no means ever pressure wash a bike. As Grum said, they should go a good long way and will give some signs of feeling rough before catastrophic failure. When the wheel is off, use an index finger to press in firmly and turn the races slowly. If there's no roughness and they're silent you should be good to go.
  12. Is anyone familiar with the behavior of the auto-resetting circuit breakers (in photo, above)? I'm used to manual reset breakers - like a fuse they need human intervention to reset. If it's auto reset does it just keep cycling or does it keep the circuit open until it's powered off - then open again when re-powered if the short remains? And how does one know it's tripped vs the load (bulb or whatever) not working?
  13. Particularly for gens that no longer have OEM stators available, it's probably worthwhile to employ what's available to extend their life.
  14. I sometimes wonder why manufacturers put together such lame design configurations. The two conclusions I've come to have been that for one the average half-life of a typical bike is probably not very long (wrecked /stolen/neglected) so just make it to last for that average life and/or two the design is such to facilitate ease and speed of assembly. That fuse block seems like a lousy idea, but during the build all the workers need to do is snap the two halfs together and move on. We're all probably operating these bikes well past their expected life so find ourselves overcoming these types o
  15. Just added an 847 to mine. Mello Dude offers a nice flip plate that mounts either nicely.
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