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Mohawk

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Mohawk last won the day on April 28

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About Mohawk

  • Rank
    Race Team Owner

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  • Location
    Bristol, UK
  • In My Garage:
    VFR800Fi Y2K, 120hp, minus 30Kg = VFR800R

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  1. Back when I was a youngster with not much money, I used to use a small (ish) padlock around the chain to stop some one wheeling my bike away. Then on my first fast car (a Renault5 GT Turbo) which we’re renowned for being hot wired, I rigged up a coil LT feed wire extension, that lead to a hidden switch mounted in the back of the ash tray. When flipped off the car will NOT start or run 😉
  2. On a cold engine 🙂 My bike had a rough idle when I added the TBR & was fine once I balanced the starter valves & adjusted the idle speed. Also check the idle speed using your PC, my rev counter reads 150-200rpm high ! So if I set it for 1300rpm, then I’m really only getting 1100-1150 rpm ! I only discovered this when checking things with the PC attached to my RBR with the engine running.
  3. So the bike will NOT run properly with the new headers if you don't adjust the fuelling. So you need either a PCV or RBR. It definitely will not work properly with the airbox removed, as there are 2 sensors attached that are needed to supply the Fi with data. The stock O2 sensors will take way too long to adjust to correct fuelling. So if you want to keep them get the RBR back on & get it to a dyno to fix the fuelling.
  4. I think you ate going about this all wrong. If your bike worked fine before the exhaust header change, then there is your issue. The new header will flow very different to the old & the fuelling will need to be adjusted. To do this properly, you should cap the PAIR system, ensure the new exhaust is sealed at all joints & remove the stock O2 sensors if you have the MTB for RBR. I swapped TB's & injectors on my & it was rough as a dog off the bat. 45 miles of mixed riding with the MTB set to +/- 15% fixed it. YMMV
  5. What is it you need to know about RBR ? I have it setup on my 5th gen with MTB & 120hp normally aspirated. As an FYI, I just changed the throttle bodies to a spare set of 99 ones with a choke lever as the wax unit on my original Y2K set has always shut off to early around 45c & the bike stalls on cool days. I’ve taper bored the entry to the TB’s up from 40mm with a step near the throttle plate where the stock intake trumpets rest, to 42mm with no step. I also fitted a set of cleaned secondhand CBR929 4-hole injectors which are almost a straight swap. Then I started it up, idled it to operating temperature & balanced the starter valves & adjusted the idle speed. Took it for a test run & there were various places it was rubbish & stumbling, slow accelerating etc, the more I rode it the better it got. Now after 45 miles it was almost back to how it was before. I stopped after 20miles & accepted the trims in base map & again at 45 miles. It was quite lean between 2000-7000rpm. Now its great again. It will need my new big airbox to complete it, as it’s running the previous 40mm entry dual stack version. But I’ll get round to that later. One thing I noticed is with the max/min trim level set to 15%, the MTB adjusts fuel as required for your set point now, where as before it was a max/min deflection number I.e. +15-15 in the table. This is better as it quickly brings the fuelling to a good AFR. Re your turbo version. If you need higher CC injectors, then the early Suzuki Hayabusa used the same injectors as did Honda Civic & CRV. There are some high quality 12-hole increased CC direct replacement injectors available for the Hayabusa. The RBR supports up to 4 MTB’s and CR46 has that setup on his. The newer version support the Bosch 4,9 wideband sensor which is a big step up from the old 4.2 that I’m using, it’s more stable & much quicker to react & last longer. Depending on your budget & how much spannering you want to do you can you can do a couple of things. 1. Buy four & let it all be fully automated. Or 2. Buy one & add 5 tap points to the exhaust. Then use the 5th point in the collector to average all 4 cylinders & save that map. Then move the sensor to each header individually & check/tune each cylinder & save each cylinders map. When all 4 are done compare them if there is no major difference then you can just use the 5th point single map. But if there are large enough variations then switch to 1 map per cylinder & manually add the base maps you previously saved. The MTB would now be redundant, but if there were variations in injector flow, you could always match those injectors in the throttle bodies. As in the two richest ones in cyl 1+3 & the leanest ones in 2+4, remember the ECU map will be richer on the rears by default. As always YMMV
  6. So the block you are looking for is located in the main harness on the left side of bike below the Franken-bolt or in that area. There is only one, mine was orange on Y2K model 5th gen, not sure if it’s the same colour for all model years. If it has NOT been molested, then it should be wrapped into the loom, so look for the bulge. If someone has previously fished it out, it may be on display or rewrapped in the loom. Mine looked perfect, the connectors in the block were all shined & clean, there were two bridge jumpers in there, an 8 & a 6 or 4 pin one, sorry been a few years, so can’t remember exactly. So I removed all the pin ends from the block by destroying it, then found 3 or 4 return wires were heavily corroded on the out side & between the individual strands was lightly corroded. So I clipped all the connectors off & stripped the coating of each wire back an inch or so. Then spread all the corroded wire ends & used some emery paper to clean them. I then intertwined all the wires & soldered together as one, then taped the new block back into the loom. As if by magic my mystery electrical woes vanished. YMMV
  7. If you check out the wiring diagram & provide an appropriate hot tap power supply to the board ( I'm not sure if its 12 or 5volts) then you should br able to prove if its the display or the circuit that supplies it. If no joy there then its likely fried 😞 If you do get life, then its the circuits, you can trace the track fault & bypass it with a soldered wire.
  8. If you keep the stock O2 sensors with RBR, then the same old Honda stock lean running will occur. If you have the MTB, then disconnect the stock O2 sensors & add at least one resistor to the power circuit of one sensor, then the ECU will default to the fixed rich map. Your MTB can correct that as it will NOT vary ever. I used the two stock O2 sensors wires in parallel to power my MTB O2 sensor. You have to use both, as the wide band sensor has double the power draw as the lambda ones ! But it means no resistors & like stock the O2 sensor is only powered when the engine is running ! 🙂
  9. The RBR uses a 3 wire QS. I built one myself, which worked great at low load, so crusing, but failed under high load as you could not move the lever. No linkage on 5/6th gens. IIRC the system monitors line voltage on 2 wires & the 3rd is for cut signal. So load cell or sensor causes a trip voltage on the sense wire. The parameters are adjustable for gear & rpm range in the RBR software, so if you can integrate the Honda gear lever sensor into the RBR, then great.
  10. Doh, I just read the last posts & yes it was a rib, rather than a suggestion. If someone can conclusively solve the 6th gen camchain issue, then that would surely be a good thing.
  11. I've looked at it conceptually & it "may" be possible to covert 6th gen to Gear drive. Alternately you could get a 5th Gen engine swap in there, like some 6th gen owners have done for just this reason. The 6th gen camchain tensioner is a particularly poor design, by way of having the tensioner cap that can seperate when swapping the tensioner & fall into the engine :(
  12. 1st VFR in 1986 was gear driven cams, all others too, until 6th gen went back to camchain. VF's are not VFR's.
  13. Hard to see in this pic but best I have unfortunately.
  14. When I added my custom High mount pipe, I forgot to spec a stand stop. So I bought some 4mm wall silicone hose cut a 2” length then slit it along one side. Slid it on to the right leg of the centre stand, whilst the bike was on the side stand, adjusted it in place to centre on the contact with the exhaust & cut a little away to fit around the stand cross bar. Once all adjusted, I cable tied it in place. Worked a treat !
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