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BusyLittleShop

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BusyLittleShop last won the day on June 20

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About BusyLittleShop

  • Birthday 10/09/1948

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  • Location
    Sacramento California
  • In My Garage:
    RC45 RC30, VFRD Peg Lowering Blocks exclusively for VFR. 5th & 6th & 8th Gen, PM for info.

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  1. If you see *continuous* temps higher than 220ºF is a problem and the proper order of items to trouble shoot are: 1)Faulty radiator cap... system should hold 1.1 pressure ratio... 2)Insufficient coolant... 3)Passages blocked in the radiator, hose or water jacket... 4)Air in the system... 5)Thermostat stuck closed... 6)Faulty temp meter or thermo sensor... 7)Faulty fan... 8)Faulty fan switch...
  2. Technically speaking No... Are oils are graded by gravity flow, formally called Kinematic Viscosity (KV) in accordance to ASTM D-445... its important to note that this test is not a measurement of an oils thickness nor an oils weight... its a measurement of time required for a fixed volume of oil at a constant temp to flow under the force of mean old Mr.Gravity... The rate of flow is expressed in Centistokes (cST)... the lower the cST number the quicker the flow which means quicker revs and more power and there is no difference in longevity between grades...
  3. Leaky valve guide seals will generate Smoke during start up and downshifting and it is not normal... As you roll off the throttle and decelerate the vacuum in your intake manifold is at the highest point... any Oil that seeps pass the valve stem seals will travel into the intake manifold and then burn in the cylinder producing smoke... Pear into thee intake and note a build up of burnt oil on the valve... new valve guide seals will cure the problem...
  4. True... Another way to prop up your prize for maintenance is a stool of correct height...
  5. When it comes to choosing a coolant just pick the color dye you prefer as they are all about the same amount of glycol and de-ionzed water... Pro Honda HP Coolant 50/50 Premix 49% Propylene Glycol 50% demineralized water Green dye Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant is pre-mixed Propylene Glycol with de-ionized water with blue dye Belray MotoChill pre-mixed Propylene Glycol with de-ionized water with blue dye Prestone Xtreme Sport Prediluted Motorcycle Coolant Propylene Glycol 50% demineralized water with red dye Dexcool 50% Propylene Glycol and demineralized water with orange dye... I don't recommend Water Wetter for the street because in 6 months the steel impeller on the Honda water pump begins to show rust... I only recommend it for track use and when you return to street drain the Wetter and go back to normal coolant with rust inhibitors... Troubleshooting High Temps If you see *continuous* temps higher than 220ºF or below 180ºF then trouble shooting is in order: Continuous engine temps above 220ºF or 104ºC is also a problem and the proper order of items to trouble shoot are: 1)Faulty radiator cap... system should hold 1.1 pressure ratio... 2)Insufficient coolant... 3)Passages blocked in the radiator, hose or water jacket... 4)Air in the system... 5)Thermostat stuck closed... 6)Faulty temp meter or thermo sensor... 7)Faulty fan... 8)Faulty fan switch...
  6. More troubleshoot is in order before you buy any more parts... the noise in time with the crankshaft... possible source of crankshaft speed noises are a scuffed piston and stuck piston ring... damaged rod bearings... To help pin point the exact location of the noise hold a long tip screw driver or a length of garden hose up to your ear and probe the suspected area... A skuffed piston will bind the ring from expanding in the bore resulting in low compression and a rattle noise... To pin point which cylinder might have a skuffed piston take a compression test... focus on the weak one... To check for a bad rod bearing set the engine at high idle and remove one spark plug wire at a time... if the noise stops then that's the cylinder with the bad rod... if noise continues after both spark plug wires were removed then the noise is something other than a rod knock because a rod will not produce a knock by just turning over the piston... it takes the spark of combustion to produce a sharp metallic sound...
  7. Ron Ayers diagram... https://www.ronayers.com/oemparts/a/hon/5053f59af870021c54be7ae2/clutch[/img]
  8. Its a simple fix designed to get your knees back in the breeze in a timely manner...
  9. I've employed the same method with great success... Ball bearings only hold so much grease... excess grease will push beyond the seal... this push feature is why I first spin the bearing to collect the excess grease before installing the seal...
  10. Under what principal of physics???
  11. A full brake service includes : 1)new pads 2)caliper piston cleaning and lube 3)removing old disc groves 4)new fluid 5)bleed To erase unwanted grooves in either stainless steal or cast iron rotors first remove the buttons... then chuck and spin in a Lathe... work a 180 grit sanding disc against the surface evenly until the groves are gone...
  12. If you remove the oil filler cap you can observe if the clutch plates do move and the degree by which they move or not...
  13. As you can see in the drawings the zip tie suggestion doesn't accomplish much because as you squeeze the lever the piston blocks the path of bubbles (blue) from reaching the reservoir... but if you leave the lever at rest the piston retracts enough to uncover the port so the bubbles (blue) can travel all the way to the reservoir...
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