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BusyLittleShop

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Everything posted by BusyLittleShop

  1. You'll find the job is easier if you first heat up the engine to operating temp and then tackle the joint... heat will expand the grip on the clamp... the hotter the better...
  2. The length of time that gasoline can be left in your fuel tank or carburetors without causing functional problems will vary depending on a variety of factors. Fuel formulations... Depending on where you operate your engine, fuel may deteriorate and oxidize more rapidly... Factors include: The air volume in a partially filled fuel tank promotes fuel deterioration. Very warm storage, high humidity and variable temperatures accelerate fuel deterioration. I personally use the 6 month fuel storage rule... any bike in the shop will receive new fuel every 6 months...
  3. I recommend Motul Chain Paste... squeeze the white grease from the tube and load the brush... Hold the loaded brush to the inside of the chain rollers to transfer the white grease... After a couple of spins of the chain it's lubed like from the Factory... Motul Chain Paste clings with no flings...
  4. BusyLittleShop

    DSC 0644

    Shows what happens when there is no security at the gate...
  5. Origins of the Hayabusa goes back to WW2... it was a WarBird that was deadly and feared but the bike version is big engine big power big deal... a real butt plug in the bendy bits...
  6. True but owners never asked Honda to shaft drive their VFR... so I say replace the $4148 dollar 40 lb shaft drive with a $800 4 pound belt drive after all a maintenance free drive system doesn't have to cost or weight as much as it does on the 1200cc Veefalo... in fact it can be lighter than the current VFR 12 lb chain and sprocket... $800 / 4 pound belt drive system $4148.00 / 40 pound shaft system...
  7. Honda's ST replacement was the 1200 Veefalow...
  8. Negative... On a fuel injection system any air that gets past the throttle bodies the map just adds the corresponding fuel... the result is high uncontrolled idle... the fact that the problem is not continuous suggest something else... However poorly insulated spark plugs do show up under acceleration... To locate spark leaks look at the engine under the cover of darkness... first spray the engine with water then start... watch for the blue arch of a miss fire... possible culprits are 1)bad wire 2) broken spark plug insulator 3) corrosion in the spark plug cap... To disassemble the spark cap use a screw driver and note any corrosion at the resistor and spring...
  9. Start with the battery for it's the weakest link in the whole system... To determine the condition of an Maintenance Free battery give it a refreshing charge... wait 30 minutes... measure terminal voltage... 12.8 or higher is a good battery... 12.0 to 12.8 is a insufficient charge... recharge... 12.0 or lower... battery unserviceable... The key to understanding a motorcycle charging system is RPMs... below 5000 and the bike consumes more than the system can replenish... above 5000 and the battery stores more than the system can use... We are in the age of the Electronic Bike... fuel delivery and spark timing and instruments and everything else operate within millionths of a volt (milli-volts) and for some reason a component doesn't receive its allotted share of volts the system starts to prioritized which components are powered and which components are cut so you can ultimately return home...
  10. I modified my stock HRC race saddle that was not only angled the rider towards the tank but was firm as a board... I laid the stock seat pan over a 3 inch block of T47 extra firm Temper Foam... I cut the basis shape using a electric carving knife... I glue the foam to the plastic pan with 3M Weather Strip or Gorilla Snot if you will... next I sculpture the foam with a air driven sander to afford a level riding position... Behold... I went from a 60 minute seat to a 12 hour seat... long distance riders know comfort and know how to get it too...
  11. Honda doesn't specify grease on the cassette for a smooth operation in the swingarm so I prefer to leave it dry...
  12. Check to see if the Axle rest at the 6 "O" clock position (Sweet Spot) which affords the greatest ride height... rotate the cassette forward and the axle rest towards the 9 "0" clock position which affords less ride height... rotate the cassette backwards and the axle rest towards to 3 "0" Clock position which affords less ride height not to mention possible slippage...
  13. True but either a Auto or MC oil will meet and exceed your mileage expectations...
  14. Reduced zinc does not equal more wear... more zinc equals longer oil interval protection but that is a moot point given the short oil change intervals favored by owners... fact is in our stock engines the majority of zinc is drained away during the oil change... Quote 540Rat So, modern low zinc oils CAN BE USED SAFELY with flat tappet cam setups, even in engines with radical cams and high spring pressures. Simply choose from the higher ranked oils on the list at the end of this write-up, and you’ll be good to go. I know people who’ve been using modern low zinc oils in High Performance flat tappet set-ups for a long time, and they’ve had no issue at all. Zinc is used/sacrificed in very small quantities at time, so the total amount present in your oil does not change how much wear protection the oil provides, as long as you don’t run out of zinc. “Lab Testing” and “Wear Testing” analysis proves/confirms that more zinc provides LONGER wear protection, NOT MORE wear protection. More from Flat Tappet know it alls... 1. Well known and respected Engineer and Tech Author David Vizard, whose own test data, largely based on real world engine dyno testing, has concluded that more zinc in motor oil can be damaging, more zinc does NOT provide todays best wear protection, and that using zinc as the primary anti-wear component, is outdated technology. 2. The GM Oil Report titled, Oil Myths from GM Techlink, concluded that high levels of zinc are damaging and that more zinc does NOT provide more wear protection. 3. A motor oil research article written by Ed Hackett titled, More than you ever wanted to know about Motor Oil, concluded that more zinc does NOT provide more wear protection, it only provides longer wear protection. 4. This from the Brad Penn Oil Company: There is such a thing as too much ZDDP. ZDDP is surface aggressive, and too much can be a detriment. ZDDP fights for the surface, blocking other additive performance. Acids generated due to excessive ZDDP contact will tie-up detergents thus encouraging corrosive wear. ZDDP effectiveness plateaus, more does NOT translate into more protection. Only so much is utilized. We dont need to saturate our oil with ZDDP.
  15. Negative... either Auto or MC oil will meet and exceed your mileage expectations... There is no such thing as "for wet clutch" oil... given that motorcycles are small part of the main oil market share our motorcycle oil is chiefly reformulated Auto oil... In fact we don't find sufficient differences in additive package between Mobil 1 Auto or Mobil 1 4T MC oil... However there is a biting difference in cost... Here are virgin oil samples of $4.89 a quart Mobil 1 Auto Oil 10W40 and $9.98 a quart Mobil 4T Motorcycle specific oil... the additive packages are so similar that our wet clutch wouldn't know the difference...
  16. My version of Sport Touring was heavy on Sport and not much on sight seeing...
  17. Aluminum will bend many times before it breaks... First apply heat like from a propane torch... a good sign its getting hot enough to bend is when spit sizzles around 212F... Employ either a long handle wrench or tube to leverage the bend back to normal...
  18. Busy Little Shop is the North American annex of HRC...
  19. Manufactures don't make their own Rec/Reg units but a so called "Yamaha Rectifier" worked better than my so called "Honda Rectifier" to establish a constant 14.2 volts no matter the RPMs... I went through 2 stock RC45 R/Rs at $227 each and 1 $300 stator and still I suffered the problem of low volts to the point where the engine would hesitate and quit... only after I give up on Honda's stuff and tried Yamaha's stuff did I have the joy of finishing my ride... There's not a lot of extra space on the RC45 for extra stuff... I had to mill off 1/2 inch off the fins and then design and machine a custom aluminum hanger... but now I show a constant 13.7 to 14.2 volts no matter the RPMS... I've completed this mod for other RC45 owners suffering from charging and running problems... 2003 to 2006 Yamaha R1 Rec/Reg
  20. Even though an 90º V4 sports perfect primary and second balances they still vibrate to some degree and the one thing to eliminate if you feel more vibrations or hear an odd rattle is a loose exhaust system because it will amplify any of those vibrations to an annoying level... tap the pipes with the palm of your hand to test if any bolts points or connections are loose... also check the foot pegs bolts and anything bolted to the foot pegs...
  21. Mercy!!! I'm relieved you're not hurt... jettisoning your hub at any speed is dangerous... proper torque and stake will limit this to a one time affair... This also happened to VFR4Lee in 2016...
  22. No CNC... just a manual Lathe and Mill at the Busy Little Shop to machine my magnesium triple clamps...
  23. Negative... Mr.Honda's V4s are evolutionary not revolutionary...
  24. You know me Patrick... I'm just a dumb guy with a Lathe and Mill...
  25. Mercy Patrick... flow equals more separation not pressure... quote Dr. Haas "It is time to introduce the concept of lubrication. Most believe that pressure = lubrication. This is false. Flow = lubrication. If pressure was the thing that somehow lubricated your engine then we would all be using 90 weight oil. Lubrication is used to separate moving parts, to keep them from touching. There is a one to one relationship between flow and separation. If you double the flow you will double the separation pressure in a bearing. The pressure at the bearing entrance is irrelevant." "In fact the relationship between pressure and flow is in opposition. If you change your oil to a thicker formula the pressure will go up. It goes up because the resistance to flow is greater and in fact the flow must go down in order for the pressure to go up. They are inversely related. Conversely if you choose a thinner oil then the pressure will go down. This can only occur if the flow has increased." Quote Rat540 "Plain bearings, such as rod and main bearings are lubricated by oil flow, not by oil pressure. Oil pressure is NOT what keeps these parts separated. Oil pressure serves only to supply the oil to this interface. The parts are kept apart by the in compressible hydrodynamic liquid oil wedge that is formed as the liquid oil is pulled in between the spinning parts. As long as sufficient oil is supplied, no wear can occur. In addition to this, the flow of oil through the bearings is what cools them."
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