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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/24/20 in all areas

  1. I sold my 6th gen VFR today. Very sad to see it go, but it was time. I'm so grateful for the tens of thousands of miles' worth of amazing experiences and memories made on that wonderful machine. I had seriously considered a couple other bikes when I bought my 2004. Specifically, a 2nd gen Yamaha FZ1, a Honda Superhawk, and a Kawasaki ZZR 600. I know without a doubt I bought the best possible bike for me, and it was terrific for almost all of the 14+ years I owned it, and the 96,700 miles I put on it. Also, I'm very happy I rode my VFR enough and kept it long enough to see 100,0
    5 points
  2. Howdy! My 5th gen "Hornet" is going to see the motorcycle treadmill tomorrow at Proven Power in Tampa! So I'd think it would be fun to see what kinda power yall think I might be laying down! Let me know below! (I feel like a youtuber saying that. lol) Relevant Mods: - K&N "small" filter - VFRD Catless Headers - Staintune Muffler - and a full fresh tank of Shell 93 octane I'll be sure to post that juicy baseline vs tuned plots we all love to see afterwards! (PFA)
    2 points
  3. You will be missed. May you put a hundred-thousand happy miles on the new ride.
    2 points
  4. My only advice is to not use a K&N filter. Other than that, I know nothing, I see nothing . . .
    2 points
  5. Mine (2013) has 35,00 miles on it and no issues, aside from a rock through the radiator and a deer collision at high speed. Neither of which can be blamed on Honda. Bulletproof bike, fast and fun! The traction control is rudimentary and kicks in when you don't want it most of the time. But it has saved my bacon on a few occasions... Definitely reliable, but like any big bike, it eats tires and gas. 😂
    2 points
  6. do we really need trendy rich guys bragging here about how much better their ducatis are ?? 😬
    2 points
  7. From a tech perspective the 8th gen is antique. My 2017 Ducati SuperSport (base model) has far superior ABS, Traction Control, and ride modes. Funny about the 790, I had a buddy that bought one and only kept it long enough to trade it in for the 890 when it released. He said the 890 was a better machine in many ways. Funny how a year difference can do so much.
    2 points
  8. The veefalo (2010 1200vfr standard) has over 60k miles on it, trouble free. It had a recall done on the shaft drive, but the old one showed no sign of failure. Its mostly stock, just a bazzaz bomb, Leo Vince slip on, and k&n air filter. I've done two valve adjustments, the rocker valves tend to need adjustments while the shim under buckets dont. I replaced the spark plugs, but saw no significant signs of worn plugs, iridium plugs are bulletproof. I forgot to replace an oring on the front valve cover, and it smoked oil a bit. I freaked out of course. Took it apart again and found my missing
    2 points
  9. What RlD said....bulletproof. You can the ECU reprogrammed if you want to lose the restrictions.
    2 points
  10. I rode this 790 for a few hours last month. Parallel twin. True, not as much character as the v4, and I'm not buying one, but it's still a very good engine. Lots of power in a tiny package. Power was very much on par with the vfr. It was a nice bike! I hate to say it, but it had tech that makes my VFR seem like an antique.
    2 points
  11. Yes this is still happening. It appears that we (those of us already in with deposits on the current group-purchase) have stalled out below the number of header systems required for an order to go forward to production. So if you come in and add yourself to those who've placed deposits we'll be closer to "go!".
    2 points
  12. ^^^this. I've asked for this step to be modified in the guide a few times and many people are missing this important step--close the bleeder between actuating SMC and before refilling with rear pedal. I reference this in my short form guide.
    2 points
  13. Taken during one of the few days left in the season :)
    2 points
  14. I bought mine new April 2020, lockdown and weather has her at 700 odd miles still. First service done and waiting to tour
    2 points
  15. First off - I'd like to say that IMHO this is one of the most valuable 6th gen guides we have - I'd like to request that it be pinned to the maintenance forum where it's readily accessible. Secondly, although I've used this guide previously with success, I would like to add some nuances to Part 3, subsection C. In that part, bleeding the Secondary Master Cylinder on the L. Front caliper and the Left Side Proportioning Control Valve (LPCV), I made a still unknown mistake and managed to get a HUGE amount of air in to the system. After two hours of cursing and frustration I quit for
    2 points
  16. My bike would go wide when I rolled on the throttle out of the turn. I solved this by adding more rebound damping in the forks to prevent the forks from telescoping out once I unloaded them by adding more throttle. Replace the fork oil too if it's been a few years, same effect. Sounds like you are experiencing poor rebound damping. The 1200 is very front heavy too, so any throttle or breaking is amplified in the handling. Sounds like the dunlops might have a bigger diameter then your old tires. Back off some preload so the bike is not nose up.
    1 point
  17. Not really related to FI issues, but thought I'd add my VFR experiences (so far) for amusement after reading some of these obviously bunny questions and obviously master replies. As a pre-amble yes, I do have a multimeter and sometimes it gives me numbers 😁. The round Africa ride on the icon of reliability and side of the road fixability Transalp was cruelly cut short at the Western Sahara-Mauritania border by Covid. Sadly parted ways and hightailed back to NZ just before Europe descended into the grips of the second wave. So sitting in 2 weeks of isolation after arriving I'm bored, witho
    1 point
  18. http://www.thurn-motorsport.de/html/verkleidung-rc36.html Other bike plastics will be possible, as anything can be made possible with enough drive.... Do introduce yourself in the Welcome section; with a picture of course! Was in your country 4 years ago on my RC36-2
    1 point
  19. All the best Tim. Must have been incredibly hard to part with a dear friend you've shared over 100,000miles with. Enjoyed many of your posts look forward to many more and hope you do eventually end up with another VFR. Safe riding and don't leave VFRD. Cheers from down south!
    1 point
  20. It's good to hear folks are already ordering this new model. I have to admit I was wrong on my "pricey ornament" comment. I thought I'd read somewhere this new bike was going to be much more expensive than it actually is. It's also good to know there are more new bikes with this engine coming, as the review says... "This isn’t just a tangent for Aprilia, it’s a whole new trajectory. The 660 engine will spawn a number of new models, including a Tuono naked bike that’s said to arrive in spring of 2021 and a Tuareg adventure bike by the end of next year." I'll be in
    1 point
  21. Before you buy a gauge, check the shop manual procedure, page 5-47 for the procedure and diagram of the type of gauge you'll need. I'm not sure you'll find a suitable FP gauge at a parts store - if it's a drive, I'd call ahead to see what they have.
    1 point
  22. Hi: If its still available I will take it. Please let me know how you would like to be paid if so. Either way thank you for being so generous. Best Regards Michael
    1 point
  23. Thanks for all the help and replies....much appreciated. I'm heading out of town tomorrow, so I likely won't get back to this until next weekend. I will order some Kroil in the meantime, so it will be waiting for me when I get back home. I will also pick up a short metal sledge hammer. I only have rubber deadblow mallets in short handles. Planning to remove the swingarm entirely. It was on my list of things to do anyway, so I could clean away 20 years of dirt and grime. This should let me place the swingarm against a solid surface to transfer all the energy nicely. It will also let
    1 point
  24. Love seeing the two 5th gens, of course, but pretty cool to see a photo of that Buell! Very rare bike now.
    1 point
  25. There are plenty if you do a search online. I've used Witch Hunter and RC Engineering. The former is less expensive but has a month long turnaround time. RC turns them quickly - a couple of days. A USPS flat rate box is just the right size for shipping. You'll get a before and after flow & spray pattern report from any of them as well as new O-rings. You will have to remove the throttle body to get at them - anyone can do it. If you need to buy replacement(s) look at them carefully (may need a magnifier) for the manufacturer part number (Denso?) and search for that - you'll likely
    1 point
  26. I hear ya - the faster you go two-up, the more visceral the helmet bumping becomes...
    1 point
  27. Regarding suspension you need to be clear about what you want out of the bike. I had mine done by Jamie, and it transformed the handling to a much more planted, stable platform that gives me more confidence in corners. On the other hand . . . toward that goal the progressive fork springs were removed and linear springs tuned for my weight installed. The result is a rougher ride - you feel expansion joints, rail tracks and other irregularities more and a really rough road can be jarring. It did take some getting used to. I suspect that 3rd gen forks have similar characteristics to 4th gens
    1 point
  28. So HighsideNZ has a 5th gen engine in 6th gen frame, with a 74mm bigbore & all of my mods for 140hp. I have a lightweight 5th gen circa 205Kg wet, with 120hp. I'd like to do more to it, but time & money always arrive independently ☹️ I never seem to have both at the same time. Happy modding 👍
    1 point
  29. Hit this a couple weeks ago on my '04. Bought the bike from its first owner with 4,225 miles on it in August 2006. My goal for 2020 was to see this number on my VFR.
    1 point
  30. Really enjoying watching this project.
    1 point
  31. The confusion comes from peoples misunderstanding of basic arithmetic. Basically you have Positive 2,3,4,5 and Negative values -2,-3,-4,-5. Where people go wrong is not understanding that -50 as a reference, then -40 is NOT -10, its -90 ! So on my post-it note, cylinder 1 is not adjustable & is the reference cylinder. On my guage below that usually measures around 200mm you can see below the needle on the left inner scale. Cylinder 2 should be adjusted = to #1. Cylinder 3 should be 220 on my gauge & cylinder 4 = 210mm. These are vacuum figures (negative) in mm/hg. H
    1 point
  32. If it ain't leaking then don't touch it would be my advice.
    1 point
  33. I'd be more confident adapting the plastics with fibreglass etc than I would be cutting and welding a tank, in fact there is a composites bay at work that usually work on aircraft parts who I could probably bribe into doing it for me... I'm going off topic tho, and I wouldn't want to distract from the amazing project in this thread!
    1 point
  34. had a fairly productive afternoon yesterday. I managed to get a load of jobs ticked off my list. one of them being a bracing around the headstock -pics: I then realised I was nearly at the point where I could stand the bike on its wheels, so i quickly fitted the forks and built the thing back up: This has been a big motivational boost for me as its turning out exactly as I planned. really keen to get cracking with it now. I can see this 2 to 3 year project being roadworthy by August.
    1 point
  35. IWorking from home 3 days a week. its amazing how much you can get done at home compared to in the office. no commute either so i am ending up with a bit extra time on my hands. Managed to get a few more bits ticked off over the weekend: Rear tank mount https://i.imgur.com /em5N80F.jpg[/img] Needs the welding finishing and dressing up with some radius ends, but it does the job. its probably the heaviest duty tank mount that ever existed! Sticking with the tank I decided to make a start on the modifiations to the tank
    1 point
  36. update. back end is done and tacked in place:
    1 point
  37. You deserve a bigger garage m8. Brilliant work, keep us posted please.
    1 point
  38. update in pictures: selling the ohlins, wood is the new gold!
    1 point
  39. Awesome build so far!
    1 point
  40. Hiya, Unfortunately there will be no cadwell mountain shots of this bike, its going to be road only. One of the things I plan to do is add another few litres to the fuel tank to give the bike a more road range.
    1 point
  41. Hi, I didn't support the back of the bike when the engine was out, I built a wooden box that fits around the oil pan and put it on a floor jack. Unbolted the swingarm and motor which was secure on the floor jack and lowered, then having reattached the subframe I removed the frame wheelbarrow style. It helps to have an extra body.
    1 point
  42. I need to share my experience with the ContiRoadAttack 2 tires. They are hands down the best tires I have ever used. They are quiet, are wearing wonderfuly, don't have "dual compounds" so there is no transition feel, but rather one compound that is heated differently between the sides and the center tread. These things grip like glue and they didn't even need to be scrubbed in. For a hypersport tire, they are the best that I have found. Definitely worth a look if you are due for a replacement.
    1 point
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