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  1. So my wife's Nephew had asked me before Covid, if we could ride to the Isle of Man for the TT races. Unfortunately the world got in the way & so we were trying to do it this year, but as they say we missed the boat. So I suggested the Classic TT, but he could not get those dates. Next suggestion was the NW200 in Northern Ireland, where I used to live & still have some old friends. So my friend Leigh (Red VFR750 4th gen) Nephew Dave (Kawasaki Z900RS) & me met up near Birmingham & one overnight Ferry from Liverpool to Belfast later on Wednesday night, took a ride up the A2 coast road on Thursday morning, which is both a great road & has fantastic views & scenery. Stopping at a few places & at one of my favourite places Ballintoy aka the Iron Islands from Game of Thrones. Or a very good Place fishing spot 👍 Cut to the chase and we watched the Thursday evening races from my friend Paul's house on the course. How close to 180mph bikes do you want to be ? Watch out for the slip stream trying to suck you over the gate. If you see the helicopter shots from Thursday you may see the Blue & Red VFR's in his garden 👍 Friday, no racing, so a free day. Caught up with my sister & my 94 year old mother, (just to explain the random pic), paid a visit to the Joey Dunlop Memorial garden in Ballymoney & tried to get to Joey's bar (but the queue for the bar was 50 deep) then off to Magilligan Point, who knew they built a peer & have a ferry there now? When I was a teenager there was an old fella with a couple of DUKW's "Ducks" that he would drive over to the other side, if you were brave enough. Pics of the cliff I nearly rode my C90 off many years ago 😳 Saturday we viewed the races from Portrush along the coast road to Portstewart. Apologies for the camera work or lack there of 🤷‍♀️ A leisurely start to Sunday with a proper Irish Fry breakfast followed by 100mile ride back to Belfast via the west & south sides of Loch Neagh (the largest body of fresh water in Europe) & back via part of the Ulster GP course & pits. Ferry back overnight & a 200 mile ride home today along the England/Welsh border via Iron Bridge (I'd never been there before). Best of all NO rain for the whole trip, 650 miles for me 👍 Enjoy https://share.icloud.com/photos/046rSuWK5ScNKefUAItcKEqkQ
    5 points
  2. You still hanging out around that area of SoCal? I was just there a few weeks ago and a neat stop is the Honda HQ in Torrance. This is the lobby... just park in visitor parking during normal weekday work hours and waltz right in. No entry fee or anything.
    4 points
  3. Now running lovely. Body work is next and I've never painted anything myself before so wish me luck 20240519_193057.mp4
    3 points
  4. As promised here's a photo of couple of bikes that folks here are interested in. More to follow.
    2 points
  5. I didn't get a chance to visit Solvang, but I did stop by the Petersen Automotive Museum. They have a number of bikes that all seemed to be on loan from the Barber collection out of Birmingham, AL. I'll try to get out for their Vintage Days again this year. I only got to hang around SoCal and family for a week before riding 2,600 miles back home. My go-to "welcome to SoCal" ritual is to enter on I-8 to Ocotillo, then jump on S2 through Anza-Borrego to 78. Take 78 to Julian for food and beer. No VFR on this run. I made the trip on Honda's largest twin.
    2 points
  6. Just checked my GPS..... May 2023 - May 2024 14,874km I donot have the GPS on all the time so I reckon 19,000km does it. Come May 2025, the plan is to work 32hrs/week from 40 now. Come May 2026, that will be a 40 year working life... time to retire. But................... health should play along as this and other threads remind us all off...
    2 points
  7. Hello from Northern Ireland! 👋 I'm back to riding after a number of years away (15+). Decided to cautiously dip my toe in the water about 6 months ago and bought a brand new Yamaha NMax 125 scooter. Well, put it like this, within 1 mile I knew I wasn't going to enjoy the slush box belt twist and go experience. I needed back on a geared bike! Before I'd stopped riding, I'd worked up from a CB250 superdream, through to a 600 Hornet and 929RR Fireblade. I finished up with a Z750 and 700 Ducati Monster before hanging up my gloves,. so I really don't know what I was thinking buying the scooter! I guess it was just nerves about finding my skills again safely, now that I'm a bit older and wiser. One of the best test rides I'd had years ago was on a 6th gen VFR800 VTEC. I owned the 929RR at the time and couldn't believe just how fun the 800 was. That engine note.... and the snap on/off VTEC was hilarious. So, my focus was on getting a clean VFR 6th gen. 3 failed attempts to buy later - 2 from a local dealer who promised to call me as soon as he had one coming in (but didn't) and a private seller of a 12k mile VTEC which I offered the asking price on. The problem though, I'm in Ireland and he was in England. Despite offering to send over proof of ID and a bank transfer deposit, he sold it out from under me. It was then that I spotted a lovely 5th gen 50th anniversary for sale locally and to my surprise... I knew the owner! I've known him back 20 years and he was ALWAYS a fussy owner. 24hrs later, the deal was done. Just 19k miles on it and in lovely condition. The proper 50th anniversary panels without a mark on them and the matching seat cowl I bought it on the spot! I'll freely admit.... the first run out didn't happen for a couple of weeks until the conditions were right. Bear in mind this is my 1st geared bike ride in probably 18 years! First issue was getting used to pulling the bike from the garage safely! No grab handles didn't help, but I remembered my bike lessons, leaning the bike into me a bit, one hand covering the brake just in case. Got geared up... got the bike warmed up.... then set off. Perhaps some might say I was mad after this time to go straight to an 800, but I knew full well that if I started on a smaller cc bike I'd hate it within hours. I never liked my 600 Hornet and always preferred something with more low down torque and longer gearing. I needn't have worried! I'd say it took about 10 minutes before I was right at home again! The VFR is a delight to ride and just right for where I'm at. I can short shift and just enjoy that rumble and whine of the cams... but give it the beans here and there. Just perfect! Previous owner fitted a voltmeter so I quickly realised that the charge system was NOT up to scratch! Discovered a TourMax R/R in there which seemed to be the well known weakness here. Stator tested well with zero ohms resistance on all 3 coils, so I'm currently mid way though installing a MOSFET R/R supplied by Kevs Shed which I'm sure many of you have watched on YouTube. Kev does a full R/R kit right down to the aluminium mount plate, silicone wiring loom and self resetting breaker. I've a new set of Bridgestones to go on as soon as that's done and a set of AS3 Performance stainless coolant hose clamps. I wasn't happy with how some of the mild steel fittings look under the fairings on inspection. After that, it's going to my local mechanic for a top to bottom health check. I plan to powder coat the forks and perhaps the side and centre stands. I've been ordering a lot of OE fittings to refresh anything that's either missing or showing signs of age. Whilst I aim to keep the bike close to original, those condom mirrors DID have to go! I've also talked to Scorpion exhausts and they are making up an OE look can with no branding so I can let a bit of that sweet V4 sound out without changing the look too much. As for that wee NMax, well, only 130 miles on it and I'd lose a fair chunk in depreciation to get rid so soon, so I've come to actually quite like it for what it is. Great for a quick run to the shops when the sun's out and room for a large bag of groceries under that seat! It's staying... for now. Thanks for reading the ramble... and I'll have plenty to ask over time no doubt 👍
    2 points
  8. I think the 2011 that was sold here was about the best 6th gen colours (aside from the US Anniversary model): Red body, black frame and forks, gold wheels.
    2 points
  9. 21 years this group has called me Al. 😂 When I first signed onto VFRD I took VTEC and AL ( I lived in Alabama at the time), hence VTECAL as a screen name. Erich (AL) If you'll be my bodyguard I can be your long lost pal I can call you Betty And Betty, when you call me, you can call me Al -Paul Simon
    2 points
  10. They did it in 2007. My head did explode, cuz for me they managed to fuck it up by putting the wrong bodywork on the wrong frame and wheel colors. That dark red bodywork would have looked killer with the black frame and wheels. And give the Anniversary a silver frame... like the one you're celebrating. I nearly managed to convince the Sales Manager to let me swap the bodywork on a pair and have the opportunity to offer one-offs, brand new VFRs. With an Anniversary Model getting ABS and the deluxe rear shock. (Think those were the mechanical differences?)
    2 points
  11. I mentioned my afr values was weird and my last start up showed nothing. Another "issue" with the header reveals itself. The LSU sensors have bottomed out in the pipe as the bung is not centered in the hole (pic1) and the bungs are way to long for this application. In an optimal world, without H2O inside the exhaust, the less protrusion of the sensors the better for flow. The bungs included on the vfrd headers are 22mm and my position on this is that they are to long when localizing sensors this far away from the source. It will accumulate water and it will kill your sensor, and of course the mechanical stress from hitting the tube on the sensor tip. Also another picture of the non-purged welds. Pic 3 shows an exhaust leak which can make afr readings wrong. I have now refitted the headers as best as I can but it is a really bad fit, at least this time i have was able to bottom the cyl3 pipe in the header to prevent a leak. Both pictures shows protrusion: Pic 4.is pre cutting the bung length. Pic 5 is with bung cut down to 12mm, which makes for 13mm bung including pipe thickness. This I critical for LSU life as water droplets will collect when sensor tip is completely covered in a bung(hole) and it will take longer time for these drops to get blown away by hot gases. Let's hope this solves it. It's 350usd every time the sensors go byebye... I should have inspected this closer pre install. Always confirm you own ideas even though professionals have fabricated something.
    2 points
  12. Oil cooler pipes may well be rotted and cannot be found new so check the condition carefully. Gear change may be rubbish if the detent spring is week and they are hard to find. Apart from that the normal Honda charging problems and general were and tear on a bike of this age.
    1 point
  13. Never believe the weatherman. We were up last month when the three day forecast was 60-70% everyday. We saw none. This weekend we had rain early or late so only a few damp roads. I was looking for you as well as "Al".
    1 point
  14. The only sketchy thing that happened to me in ten days. Stupid GoPro.
    1 point
  15. Finally got this project under the pressure washer, now I can better see what's going on. Plenty of frame polishing, parts refinishing and painting/powder coating, fork seals, fuse block cover, new rear tail light (help a brother our here if you got one), glass seals on the instruments seem to have a problem as water just got in there when I washed it. Wheels have to be cleaned up as It sat in the woods for a while, rear rim has a small spot of rust, brakes are gonna need a full rebuild both front and rear. Now the engine, turns freely but certain it's gonna be milky mess as penetrating oil seeped right past the plugs, guess we will know more tomorrow as I get into it. The carbs are a mess a run thru the ultrasonic will tell us the direction on that. transmission however looks perfect. Tires are almost brand new. Rear suspension cleaned up bright red on the spring...happy dance 🙂 still looking for a set of front lower side fairings that won't drain my bank account.
    1 point
  16. That would have been fun. I always have renewed respect for your LA commuting on two wheels whenever I ride or drive through LA. Yesterday heading south I sort of went around, 118-->210-->15. Tomorrow morning going north it's the 405. I might hop over to the PCH at Santa Monica once I have most of the city freeways behind me. Hope you get some time to enjoy Hawaii despite work and the weather.
    1 point
  17. Well got the O rings for the inlet rubbers for the FJ1200 Did also change the float needle as housings as I had new as carbs off Then did a ride whit my woman on the F2 CBR to a nice Cafe, and man my leathers size 48 still fits! Actually even more easy than 2 year's back when last used them!
    1 point
  18. VFR headers are based on the TBR headers I use. I run one Bosch 4.9 Wideband O2 sensor at the last 2-1 connection before silencer link pipe. Not at home this weekend so no pics. It is powered from both stock Narrow Band power feeds, so no O2 eliminators required. One narrow band circuit does not have the AMP rating for the wideband, but both more than cover it 😁. 4.9 is connected to MTB for RBRacing modul. I used a weld on bung port as these TBR headers had none. The sensor tip protrudes 2-3mm past the inner face of the pipe. That is beyond the tapered section of the sensor head, as in 2mm of shoulder exposed in the exhaust.
    1 point
  19. First overnight trip in almost 2yrs (finally!) for reasons you can read above. Headed south from Sonoma county towards San Diego county. Midway was Solvang--Denmark in CA. I can't believe how large trucks have gotten here in the U.S. Obviously all 20 million parking spaces should be expanded by 10 feet in width...
    1 point
  20. The most likely culprit for a locked back brake is the secondary master cylinder on the left fork leg. This moves when you apply the front brake and applies pressure to the centre piston on the back brake. If the SMC seizes or gets blocked, it applies pressure but then can't release.
    1 point
  21. Certainly sounds like you set the cams correctly. But you can check by physically rotating the crank and observing the cams. If you start with #1 (left rear) with the intake cam bearing on the valve, then rotate the engine 450 degrees, #2 (front left) should now be pressing on the intake valve. If the cam timing is correct then maybe you have a VTEC problem? The VTEC actuation is around the 6800rpm mark.
    1 point
  22. Grum might be onto something here. I know with the VTR1000F engine, it was possible to set the cams in the front and rear heads correctly with respect to the crank/marks, but out of time between the front and rear heads. This meant that instead of the rear cylinder firing 270 degrees after the front, the rear missed another 360 rotation and so fired at 630 degrees. In that engine it started and ran fine but was reluctant to rev. The manual has some very specific instructions about the sequence of cam reinstallation so that this is accounted for. I'm not saying this is the issue for you but it won't be hard to check.
    1 point
  23. What's the difference? This achieves your desired goal in a simple way. Your way can't work without an unknown amount of machining and/or mixing and matching parts. There's no place for a shim as it's usually a part of the VTEC bucket. The retainer sits very low. Experimenting with valve clearance trough lapping could achieve desired clearance but further adjustment as the valve recedes into the seat would be more complicated than the usual way of replacing the bucket with a thinner one, thus totally defeating the purpose of having a simpler adjustment procedure. If you want 4 valves all the time and easier clearance measurment follow the thread mohawk posted. Adjustment will be the same - replace the VTEC bucket. Yes it's more expensive than shimming but a 100$ for three buckets every 5 years is better than reinventing the valvetrain.
    1 point
  24. Your idea has been discussed before. It doesn't seem like anyone has done the deep dive along the lines you propose. From the look of the parts diagram it appears you would need to change the VTEC valves for standard ones together with springs, collets etc. Lap in the new valves, experiment with valve clearances and possibly remap the ECU parameters. I doubt it would be straightforward.
    1 point
  25. Since ~14 is pretty lean for throttle response but good for cruising the accelerator pump function can add a set amount (say 10 points in the fuel trim table) whenever you open the throttle more. There's also a sensitivity setting so you can alter how quickly the throttle needs to be opened for the additional fuel to be added. It can also advance ignition timing in the same manner. There's no knock sensor so there is no mechanism to retard timing in case of knocking so it's probably not a good idea to use that function.
    1 point
  26. So plugged my laptop in to rapid bike this morning, as bike was running warm last Wednesday on the way to the ferry on motorway in 25c temps. Turns out I'd set the MTB to run 14.4:1 AFR & was running it on E10, it was fine when I swapped to E5 for the rest of the trip. It managed just over 50mpg, but was a bit sluggish to accelerate in high gear low revs, then I discovered the accelerator pump function was switched off 😞 That's what happens when you forget to finish some testing & then prep bike in a hurry.
    1 point
  27. The 50th "Anni" version was offered all over the world (except North America, where having two colors of the same bike available in the same year would have exploded heads). But, it was indeed only sold in 1999, so it will always be a "limited edition"! TourMax is actually a well-known Japanese aftermarket reg-rec brand, and I wouldn't be surprised if it turns out to be Shindengen-owned. Shindengen made all the OEM Honda reg-recs, as well as most of the other Japanese brands' OEM reg-recs. But, if it was an aftermarket version of a badly spec'd OEM reg-rec (the original OEM reg-rec being rather prone to fail), that could be the issue right there... Welcome to the forum from somewhere else! Ciao, JZH
    1 point
  28. A little rally prep on the VFRs and CB-1. Oil level checks. Chain adjustments. Coolant level checks. PSI checks.
    1 point
  29. Indeed! Rapidbike quotes 300usd pr sensor at dealers. I have taken your route twice and almost halved the cost. NOK/USD is in a very bad place ATM! The torocharger kit was 5400usd if I remember correctly 13 years ago at 6 nok/usd - today its 9! Since I am tuning this myself I don't want to trust used sensors as this is very critical information and I ran out of spare engines 2 weeks ago 😅
    1 point
  30. Thanks 👍🏻 From what I can see, this was a UK limited run of 250 bikes in 1999. It celebrated 50 years of Honda road bike sales and is done in the 1960's racing colours.
    1 point
  31. Welcome to the site, rare nice looking Honda 50th anniversary VFR! Congrats on finding one in such good condition.
    1 point
  32. Hay Peeps, Hope all u guys are doing well. I agree with the general consensus that the 5th Gen OEM Showa rear shock is a bit lacking in some ways, to me it always feels a bit harsh & over damped, even set to manual's recommended settings, shocks still in great condition for it's age though, never leaked any oil. So recently been thinking of sourcing a new shock, prices aint cheap, we're talking £350-£450 for a basic emulsion type shock, which isn't worth the asking price for a same spec design shock that I already have as OEM, may be they're more suitably valved for a heavier bike & better ride, but I can't justify the expense for such a basic shock. I've done some research, considered a few shocks that would physically be a suitable donor for this project. Discovered that a 2018 ZX10rr Twin tube compact alloy shock had been fitted to a 5th Gen, forum member never updated his work on spring weight/dimensions/damping settings used after fitting, so I'm unaware if he had it re-shimmed to suit the 5th Gen or is still riding on the original valve shimming set by Kawasaki? I accept the ZX10 shock is a tad shorter stroke, valve shim stack may well be unsuitable in it's current ZX10 spec, as its spec'd for a much lighter bike, but the general compact design lends itself to being a great shock to use, valve shims can always be sorted at a later date once the physical barriers have been overcome, which is where I am now, hence I thought I'd share my exploits for those that might be interested. I kept an eye on eBay for a few months & eventually sourced an as new zero miles 2019 ZX10rr shock off eBay £120 posted. Shock came with the upper steel mounting bracket, I did consider modifying this top mount it until I discovered an all alloy unit from a Gixxer 1000 had the correct inner dimensions to match the ZX10's upper shock bush, plus it easily cleared the top of the shock, so grinding out wouldn't be required. eBay to the rescue again, Gixxer alloy top shock mount £8 posted. Next barrier was get the ZX10 shock/Gixxer top mount combo to match the OEM shock & top mount dimensions. OEM shock is 325mm centre - centre plus top mount. ZX10 shock is a tad shorter, at 309mm, which isn't such a bad thing as it turns out, using the alloy Gixxer top mount gave me more than enough material to use to match the OEM length plus a bit more to factor in some adjustability on ride height too. ZX10 shock appears to be used upside down, as it's a twin tube compact unit, it makes no odds which orientation it's used in. So on the 5th Gen, it'll need inverting, bringing the threaded pre-load rings & damper adjusters to the top & accessible on the 5th Gen thru the left side frame above the chain guard. Upon measuring the ZX10 shock, I found both upper & lower mounts are the exact same internal bore dimensions, so I pressed out the rubberised steel bushing & needle roller bearing flipped the shock pressed the bush into the other end, shock is now inverted, with the lower needle roller bearing issue to figure out. After some measuring & head scratching, I found the now bottom eye to be too narrow, 39mm was my goal, after studying potential bearing options, I decided to keep the ZX10's OEM inner bearing top hat bushings, but these would no longer be a direct fit in the other end on of the Zx10's shock, internal bores are the same but not the width's so thinking cap on, sussed out that using 2 narrower needle roller bearings would work centred in the shock eye, this would leave me with enough room for a pair of dust seals & using the original bearing top hat bushings would give me an excess width of 4mm, inner section of the top hats was 3mm too short so bushings would bind & lock solid the bottom eye, so this was spaced out with 3x1mm brake hose banjo sealing washers, I had some in stock that fit inside the needle bearing with clearance. 2 appropriate sized needle rollers fitted into bottom mount with dust seals, top hat bushing spaced out internally, correct clearance so no metal - metal contact like the OEM shock is plagued with between the triangle plates, ZX10 top hat width was now 43mm, so needed reducing externally by exactly 2mm each bush to get a total bottom width of 39mm, it's now a perfect fit between the alloy triangle plates & no metal to metal binding. Now to figure out how this Gixxer alloy top mount will work. Gixxer mount is a really chunky bit of kit, so I elected to cut down the 20mm diameter thread section, leaving enough material to accept the original lock nut, I ground off the steel locking section & lost only 1mm from the nut, further measuring up proved the nut to be too thick, so I cut the nut in half & inverted the big nut, this could now be used as my ride height adjuster, bottomed the nut on the alloy mount, ground a flat on the nut so it locked against the under side of the bikes frame mount, proved to work as expected, a lot of careful measuring, I decided to leave it 3mm longer than my original plan of matching the same dimensions as the 5th Gens OEM shock & mount combo. So at this point I have a nearly ready to install shock & top mount which is plus 3mm, plus option to increase ride height by another 4mm by using the Gixxer's inverted top nut, 1 turn out gave an exact 1mm of added shock length & gave approx 2-3mm bike ride height increase. Gixxer top mount now needed some way to bolt it into the 5th Gen, 2 options came to mind, drill out the centre & thread it to accept an M10 bolt from above or loctite a high tensile M10 bolt into the Gixxer mount & bolt the shock in place so it mounts the same as the 5th Gen's OEM mount does. I already had a spare Gixxer mount in case I screwed up this one, but it turned out bang as measured, I have no complaints so far. 1st shock install into bike gave +5mm on ride height (measured on centre stand). ZX10 OEM spring is way too weak @ 95nm to support the 5th Gen's girth. 1st spring I tried was a 115nm K-tech left over from a previous project, this gave far too much static sag. Pulled the shock, fitted a 125nm K-tech, a bit better, but still too much sag. I then discovered the OEM Honda spring was a claimed 130nm, albeit a tapered progressive coil of sorts, at the time I thought this 130nm to be incorrect, as I'd tried a 125nm & it proved to give way too much sag, I didn't know at the time that the OEM 5th Gen shock has a ton of pre-load, slept on it & figured out this was my main issue causing excess sag as bikes sagging on its weaker end coils & these need a good amount of pre-load to get the spring to work enough to support the 5th Gen weight. As my test springs are 155mm & not the correct 170mm length, I didn't have any suitable spacers at this time to add to the spring to get nearer the optimum 175mm, surely this is what's causing my excess sag? I'd convinced myself I need an even heavier spring than a 130nm. Back on Ebay again, found an as new 160nm K-tech spring £40 posted, albeit a 155mm length, I took a punt & bought it. A friend builds race cars for a living & has access to all manner of useful bits n bobs, I had a rummage in his spares box & found some race shock pre-load alloy lock rings, my pal turned these down on his lathe while I waited as the inner bore was a bit too small to fit the ZX10 shock, £20 changed hands & I walked away with a smile on my face & 3 anodised alloy spacers to play with. A few days later the 160nm spring arrived, back in the garage, pulled the shock again, stripped it down, played around with these fancy looking new spacers, I could only make use of 2 spacers which gave me an added 20mm, so I'm now at 170mm of spring/spacer stack height. Fitted em back onto shock, spring compressors had to work a bit harder due to the longer stack height, ZX10 shock only has 25mm of pre-load thread to play with, I easily achieved 20mm of sag with the 160nm spring & spacers, but it was near the end of my available 25mm of pre-load thread. I didn't have a helper to measure sag with me onboard, so I've no idea at this point. A road test is imminent once i get the new tyres on & wheels repainted. If rider sag proves to be inadequate, I'll have to source a new 175mm x 160nm spring from K-tech, no big deal really, this will take my total build cost to less than £300, which aint bad for a shock of this spec imho. Currently into this shock mod for less than £200. Rebound damping has 4.5 turns, I'm now @ 2 turns in from fully out which is enough to damp the spring at the top of its 1st bounce. Compression also has 4.5 turns, I'm at now @ 2 turns in from fully out, seems enough as a starting point, so hopefully I have enough damping adjustability without pulling the shock again time & getting the shims doctored at my local bike suspension guru's Ohlins service shop. I'll update my findings after a road test, fingers are crossed. Bye for now👍 ----------------------------- Update: Still unable to find any proof of the OEM spring rate that I actually believe, manual states 130n/mm (I smell bullshit). K-tech / Ohlins /Maxton / Hyperpro don't appear to supply high rate springs in the dimensions I need for this ZX10rr shock. Lots of google searching, I've discovered Honda designed a linkage ratio that needs a way higher spring rate than any other bike of a similar weight, like 20 x fork spring rate which is just insane. Eg) I have a modified R6 shock with a stock 95n/mm spring on my 2003 FZS1000, similar wet weight as a 5th Gen & it's more than enough for my 17.5st in full gear. Just goes to show, linkage ratio governs everything on a bike's arse end. I've found a spring supplier (Faulkner springs UK) if anyone needs a heavier spring, these guys do springs up to 2000lb/inch. Ordered a couple of 7"x 2.25" to play around with ... 1100lb/inch & 1200lb/inch, once I've confirmed good static & rider sag numbers, I'll pull the shock & get it shimmed to suit the new spring. Link below if anyone needs a huge selection of springs to go at. https://dfaulknersprings.com/shop/
    1 point
  33. I had it in Camel colours after I dropped it on the track in 2006. When it got damaged by Canada Customs, I wanted it in the yellow I'd seen on VFR800s, which turned out to be the Goldwing Pearl Yellow.
    1 point
  34. For those who have posted WTB listing. Do not proceed with any transactions at the suggestion of new members who provide email address (that are supposedly real members email address ) stating that those real members have what you are looking to buy. The email address is not that of the real member and it's a scam . Edit 5/17/24 another idiot tried to pull the same scam on me. I sent them a link to this thread.
    1 point
  35. You're confusing me Vlad! You said you cleaned All the SV's. Already mentioned this! And your answer! Refer to 5-65 of the Service Manual for SV removal, don't think you'll need to remove the whole TB to remove the SV's. Perhaps a squirt of WD-40 might help if the plungers are sticking in the bore. AND, just incase you intend on cleaning the throttle intakes - WARNING - Be very careful when cleaning the Throttle Body Intakes not to damage the Molybdenum seal coating for the butterflies, do that and you'll end up with high rough idle, you could also end up needing a replacement throttle body assembly!.
    1 point
  36. Well, the first dyno didn't go very well, horsepower dropped by 7hp and torque by 5nm over the entire rev range. We stated that we need to set the timing of the exhaust cams to the original numbers and try again. On Sunday, I adjusted the exhaust camshafts to the original numbers and did some test drives, the 3rd cylinder plug broke during the first test and the 2nd cylinder plug broke during the second test. The third test went very well, although the air was so cold that I didn't feel like going far for a ride when it was 2 degrees Celsius warm. I ordered new plugs and the dyno will be back in a week. I just started to wonder if the old plugs had any effect on the first dyno pull when the result was so bad. So I can't say anything specific about the test drive yet, I need to get more miles under it.
    1 point
  37. until

    You can run sweep and carry the drinks! 🙂 Safe travels.
    1 point
  38. Replaced the front cam chain tensioner lifter. Someone who calls themselves a mechanic, in their infinite wisdom, thought it would be a good idea to hold the gasket in place with a bit of sticky tape. And you guessed it the sticky tape covered the oil feed hole. WTAF. Anyways I'm thinking that most of the noise came from the sloppy head 😏😀 of the lifter rather than the weak spring.
    1 point
  39. With style like that, could it have been anything else? Ciao, JZH
    1 point
  40. Also not from waaayyyy back, but still pretty far back. I was both exhausted and satisfied after completing a SaddleSore 1000 ride just outside Boulogne, France, in around 1998. I think the photo was originally a 35mm slide (which I was still using--and explains why I have several boxes full of slides and few digital photos from the early days!) The FL was my original 1990, bought new in California. Retired it after 60,000 mi or so, but it could have gone on and on (if I had replaced the cam shaft I broke whilst improperly tightening the cap bolts...). Ciao, JZH
    1 point
  41. Rode a few bikes as a youngster, but didn't really start riding until '98. Oldest pic I have of me & the '87 ZX600 is from '05. First VFR was '09.
    1 point
  42. I can't quite match the vintage, but here we are in 1982, me and my mighty CB125T; two tiny pistons frantically going nowhere! 12000rpm redline! The T did not stand for torque however. This was my first motorcycle and started my love afair with Honda.
    1 point
  43. Just for a laugh!..... 1972 - Yikes, 52 years ago!! My beloved Honda SL100, absolutely had a hoot with this bike. Worked three paper delivery rounds per week to save up for it. I'd really give this bike a work out and never had a fault with it. That bike won me over forever with Honda's build quality, reliability and durability. My buddies little Honda Mini Trail was also bulletproof. ATGATT...only partially back then. Cheers
    1 point
  44. OK Lorne. I didn't go back far enough (the end of my digital photos is ~ a little over 20 yrs ago). However, here's an action photo of me about to drag my knee, wearing, obviously, ATGATT. I challenge all here at VFRD to name vehicle brand as well as engine. Cheers!
    1 point
  45. The round Delkevics that come with the VFR package will clear the bag mounts without modification. Looks like the OP bought a couple of their different short cans to go with the middle Y junction pipe from Delkevic...which is pretty cool.
    1 point
  46. I used a little MAF cleaner that I had on the shelf. Didn't take much. I suspect carb cleaner would have worked as well. Just a few light, quick sprays to remove the old lube that was on the contacts. I then added a little brake lube that was out since I did the rear brakes. Worked great. On the turn signals (and all of the plastics) I used Meguiar's Ultimate polish on a white foam pad with my dual action polisher. For small pieces like the turn signals it can be done by hand if you don't have a DA. Just clean the part, add a bit of polish to a clean microfiber, use circular motion with light pressure for maybe a minute. Wipe off when done to reveal the shine, repeat as needed. If you want to polish the tank and fairings, a machine polisher is the way to go. I was a bit surprised to find that the plastics on the bike are single stage paint (got some red paint transfer on the pad) and only the tank has clear coat. They did polish up nicely though. @Grum I tried some Autosol metal polish on the pipe and it worked very well. Thanks for the tip! The bike is basically put back together at this point. Just waiting for some clear weather for a shake down run and some outside pics. Cheers, Justin
    1 point
  47. I began with a strip down of the basic plastic removal around 3am in the morning, I work nights anyway and well it is a quiet time for me with no interruptions from nosy family members! That took no time at all I am getting pretty good at removing the plastic. Yes you have to remove all that just to get to the front spark plugs, lucky they use high mileage iridium spark plugs with a 30k lifetime so you are going to have to inspect the valves before hand before you have to replace them - I did that and they all looked fine. I had all of my exhaust valves just out of spec those are the rocker roller set, and one of the bucket under shim intakes was loose but still in spec. Just as I figured the roller rocker design would be more apt to be out of spec then the bucket under shims would be, just like the CRX dirt bikes! Its a simple elegant design, less rolling mass with only one cam shaft and the cam chain does not need a huge bend in it for a powerful cam chain tensioner this design uses a spring loaded bow tensioner instead of a massive punch design like the vtecs use. There are two marks on the timing cover I suppose its easier then the 4 I had on the old girl, you watch the cam shaft on the rear set for direction ques as you turn it to make sure the engine is in top dead center for the cylinder your inspecting all marked out in the manual but the manual has very small pictures for the cam shaft positions so its hard to read. I managed it though. They have 3 measurements for the Valve Clearance Exhaust Valves have a roller rocker design with a roller on one end and a screw driver and lock nut on the other with a square head for the driver. They were all out of spec all of them! The manual has two sets of measurements for the exhaust side Valve side with the lock nut 0.03 + or - 0,02 mm or (0.012 + or - 0.001 inches) Roller side 0.21 + or - 0.02 mm or (0.008 + or - 0.001 inches) my gap strips were in listed in both but came stepped up in inch sizes so I use the inch listings Intake side is the shim under bucket design 0.16 + or - 0.003 or (0.006 + or - 0.001 inches) on one was loose at .007 but still in tolerance and most likely to go tight as it wears. Edited some of the photos with additional info that I neglected to mention first draft. I started at 3am and had it done and back together with the bike running at 6am. Including a half an hour bathroom veg out break, take your time, be diliberate, read the manual for instructions, read all the back pages for what to do and dont take any short cuts be careful removing connectors and fasteners they can get dropped easy - calm slow and methodical is best. If you dont have much time to do it then just let a pro do it or wait till you can dedicate all your attention to it and not hurry the job. Break it up into sections/tasks and it wont seem so difficult. Each task one at a time then reverse it to button it all back up.
    1 point
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