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  1. I'm turning 74... so I'm reminiscing the milestones during 57 years of Riding and Racing... 1963... It all started with a set of mini bike plans from the back of Popular Mechanics... 1964... My first ride was on a step through Honda 55 in 1965 and I recall the experience vividly... I got on the saddle and screwed open the throttle and took off like a shot across the yard... my senses became over whelmed with this new feel of acceleration... I froze on the controls and fixated on the fence growing in my path... will it end the madness??? no to my horror the front wheel just scales up the wire without slowing down driven by the rear wheel digging in the dirt... I was so impressed with the amount of force of 5 whole horse power that I did the one thing I knew would stop it... I lifted the rear wheel off ground... as the engine raced and with the back tire spinning madly I finally remember to close the throttle... Mercy!!! this is not as easy as it looks... 1965... First bike I purchased was a Honda C 200 a iron barrel push rod 90... it lasted two weeks before I traded it in on a Honda S90 at Bar-B Marina... 1965... First new bike was a Honda S-90... I'd wake up in the morning and just ride... anywhere was good... across the Bay Bridge it didn't matter... just racing at 60 mph was enough of a challenge out of 8HP... it helped to have a tail wind... I'm being honest... when I'm on a bike and it don't feel right to me... I stop thinking about riding and start thinking about a solution... and thats been true since 1967 when I inadvertently spun a donut in the dirt on my Honda S90... I thought there was something wrong because it had never done that before... I stopped riding and disassemble the whole bike looking for clues... only after the engine was on the ground that it finally struck my mind that maybe sliding was something to be played with... I assembled the whole mess back together and so began my love affair for donuts and dirt... 1966... Honda CL160... wow real power for two up riding and romance... in fact Mary and I first kiss happened on a ride... 1967... After we got married and moved to San Bernardino... Mary felt daring enough to take pics of my CL160 as it jumped over her... First competition was a USAF sponsored gymnkana or skills test... I was surprised to take 4 of the 5 trophies... I'm never 100% happy with my riding skills... I thought the Honda CL160 was a dirt bike... it was good on jumps but poor on landings... taking 3 bounces to settled down... 1969... Busy Little Shop #1 was the living room in our first cottage... our Land Lady wasn't happy with bike parts inside her spot less rental... so I used the lamp shade over the frame trick to hide the fact I was building a motorcycle... never the less she swore I was a member of the Hells Angel... 1970... Kawasaki 350 BigHorn... I was asked to perform movie stunt work for a Air Force Now film but after my wheelie crash the USAF enlistment board denied my request for enlistment based on their initial perception that I had "no personal concern for my safety"... My film director had to set the record straight... 1972... CR 250 Husqvarna that I raced in the CRC SoCal Motocross... I loved the sandy beaches of Ensenada Mexico... Busy Little Shop #2 was in the spare bedroom of our Land Lady's second rental... she never gave up the notion that I would move the bike outside and make room for kids inside... little did she understand that some of us like motorcycles better... 1976... WR250 Husqvarna... my version of a street legal dirt bike... 1978... My first time over 100mph was on Waldo's hand built Z1 complete with Ocelot fairings... I though you must be nuts to ride at those speeds... 1979... While stationed in Japan I bought a CR250R Honda direct from a Honda factory worker who must have pilfered some extra parts... I recall that the Japanese government turned me down 5 times for a street legal license plate... So I raced the CR in the black sands of Fuji MX park... 1980... Busy Little Shop #3 was inside our home in Japan... P5 Ushihama Heights Tokyo To... 1981... I'll never forget meeting Hirotoshi Honda #1 son of Soichiro Honda 1980... Z400FX Kawasaki... Japanese 4 unique to the home market... I painted the wheels School Bus yellow and installed a Honda fairing and tail cowl... It was deemed the Circus Wheeled Kawasaki by the Honda factory workers at the Saitama Honda Plant they christened the frame with a sticker "Made by Honda Motors LTD"... 1981... While stationed in Wichita Kansas I ordered a new GPz550 from East Side Honda... 3 days later I was off for a 1500 mile round trip to New York and back... next summer I rode home to California and back... I got the 3 spoke magnesium Dymags direct from Harris Performance while on a TDY to England courtesy of the USAF... 1986... XC400 Husqvarna... another Husky I made into a street legal dirt bike... I mainly rode Little Sahara State Park... the Park Rangers would check for your steel whip antenna and orange flag at the entrance... I didn't mind the flag but steel whip antenna would give my helmet a nasty whack every time I stopped... it got so that I'd jettisoned the antenna and then ride out of sight from the rangers patrolling in their dune buggies... 1984... 84 VF500F Interceptor... my first love affair with the V4 begins... 1988... 86 VF500F Interceptor from Golden Gate Cycles... I engineered this into famous Belt-0-Ceptor... I racked up 98,000 trouble free miles... 1998... 94 RC45 found in Tijuana Mexico for 8K... Full circle... the yard where I first rode a motorcycle in 1965... Same yard 43 years later on Mr.RC45...
    16 points
  2. Just posting about a few things done on the '99, I'm coming up on 20-years of ownership this week (9/14) and just short of 118K miles. Finished up adding the Ducati 1098 rear wheel conversion with the Australian Extreme Creations kit. And more Sebspeed Customs parts, custom cut RC51 triples with an offset closer to the original VFR specs, with a Rizoma bar. VFRD Wild headers mated to the completely refurbished Wolf exhaust from sfdownhill, done late last year. And just had the Ohlins serviced a few weeks ago. More to come eventually, on the lookout for some forged wheels. Thanks to Sebspeed for the work to create the triples, awesome design.
    13 points
  3. A little over 2 years ago I bought a 1990 with 45,000 kilometers/28,000 miles on the clock from a member here from Canada. I went on my merry way off to sea for work thinking I'll pick it up when I get back. Well that didn't work out as the border was closed by the time I did return. Glenn, the owner, was kind enough to store it for me, put a charger on it and periodically start it up for the better part of 2 years as I waited for the Border to reopen. When it did re open my first try was not successful. In order to enter I needed my passport, proof of vaccination, proof of negative Covid test within 72 hours and had to fill out a Arrive Canada online form only after I had proof of a negative test. My test came in to late to meet this standard so I shelled out $175 for a quicker one at a clinic in Bangor. Once at the border, it was the usual drill, passport, proof of vaccination, proof of negative test and proof of Arrive Canada form filled out. Then it was.... Reason of visit "to pick up a motorcycle" What type? "Honda" Model? "1990 VFR750" The Border agent suddenly relaxed a bit, and leaned out the window, " I have a 2002, and love it" Well since there was no one behind me we chatted for about 15 minutes about VFR's. It had been raining since I left, but it really started to come down now, The remnants of Hurricane Ida were tracking right over New Brunswick. I stopped for a bit just short of St John as the trusty CRV's AWD light had been coming on about every 5-10 seconds and the vehicle was going light. With standing water on the highway like I had not seen in a long time I knew it was hydroplaning, also the 4 cars over turned and 2 in the woods kinda confirmed things were not well. So I pulled off the road and notified Glenn I may not make it. After a quick perusal of Hotel options I carried on, slowly, like 30 mph in a 62mph zone. I ended up stopping 4 more times as I could not see, and the Honda was starting to go at less than desirable angles. I made it finally, 12.5 hours for what is normally a 9 hour trip to Nova Scotia. Glenn and his wife kindly put me up as I was shattered and tired. We had dinner the Glenn and I loaded the bike on the trailer. I was up at 5 am and on the road at 6. Made it to Calais around 12, and declared the bike for import and was kindly directed to the side. A few minutes later a young woman in Border Patrol gear came over and asked a few questions and I handed her my paperwork. Half hour later she came back to apologize as no one on station, nor any one they called had done a motorcycle importation. I laughed and said they must do a lot of snowmobiles though! She smiled and said "Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring, we see a Lot of Snow Machines......... A few minutes after the head of Customs came out for a quick chat and asked me about the bike and could I get out of the car and have a look with him. Nice guy I showed him the head stem Vin and he said he could nor believe this was a 31 year old bike. We talked bikes for a bit then I got back in the car. A few minutes after the woman Border Patrol officer came out with a bunch of papers for me to sign and noted That I was on the hook for $5.08 in duty, which her boss laughed off and I was on my way. I cannot convey how professional, attentive, courteous and friendly the whole process was. Thank You Calais Maine Border Patrol. The bike.
    12 points
  4. Today I put precisely 77.9 miles on the RC51 on roads in my back yard, fantastic roads actually, but unfortunately during the summer occupied by vehicles both 10 times larger, and 10 times slower, than my bike. This time of year it is a know hazard, tourist season, but this afternoon I actually had above-average miles of perfectly paved winding coast road open to me and the RC. To be fair, our locals are very nice about pulling over into the frequent turnouts, as the signs tell them to. Tourists not so much (can you say Mustang convertible?) As always, the rule-of-thumb here is that the more cows you see, the more bugs you have to remove from your face shield. Rolling through Tomales I made a spur-of-the-moment left turn towards Dillon Beach, then cut through back roads towards Valley Ford. Looped back south through Nick's Cove, Marshall (I don't like oysters), with hardly a rolling RV roadblock to slow me down. What a great road! By the time I got to Point Reyes Station the parade had slowed to a crawl, but I turned east at Olema to the back roads that I know, bumpy but thinly traveled. I will never sell this bike, what a hoot. 😎
    12 points
  5. A million years ago I had a Red (fastest color) VFR800, and enjoyed it for quite a while but ended up trading it for another bike just to have something different. The first VFR I bought for pretty cheap because it had been sitting in a basement for 9 years, and didn't run. I ended up having to rebuild the fuel system, pull the throttle bodies, fix and clean the injectors, replace the tires, replace rubber bits that dry rotted, etc. Which leads us to now. A buddy of mine had a 2000 Yellow VFR that he loved and put some miles on. Then he got married, and the riding happened less and less. Eventually the bike ended up at my place with the thought that he'd come out and ride it (I live in the middle of a lot of great riding) sometimes. Moving forward 11ish years, he moved away and before he left he came over and gave me the title. So I had another project to play with, yay! Where it sat for all those years. Untitled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Freshly washed just to make it easier to work on. Note the date on the inspection sticker. Washed ready to work on by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr In the barn for the diagnostics. Cleaned up ready for fixing by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Last gallon of gas from the tank. The problem with these bikes is that if you run the tank dry, it still leaves all the fuel in the lines and throttle bodies. This is what the owner of my red bike did. This bike just sat with a half-full tank. Last gallon of old fuel removed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Didn't hear the fuel pump run when I applied power to the bike so out it came. Fuel pump bad by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr And yup, there's rust. And you can see some of the rubber bits that broke off inside the tank. Rust in gas tank by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Fuel level sender was bad too. Took it apart, cleaned it, reflowed the solder on all connections and it works now. Fuel level sensor by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Filled the tank with evaporust and let it sit for a couple hours, drained it out and checked: After first cleaning by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Put the evaporust back in and let it sit overnight with a spare fuel pump circulating it, then washed it out with degreaser, set a spare radiator fan on to dry it (the radiator fan which I originally bought for my last one to see if I could put one on the left radiator) and now there's no rust. After a day of drying I used a long bent spray nozzle to reach into all the nooks and crannies to blow the junk out of the tank. More reasonably sized fan to dry tank by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr After cleaning and de-rusting by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Then I pulled the throttle bodies out and removed the injectors. Gross. Grossness in the injector hole by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Grossness in the injector hole by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Grossness on the injector itself by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Cut up a ford car stereo connector to fit the injectors and made myself an injector cleaner. Modified car stereo connector by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Homemade injector cleaner by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Injectors cleaned they were reinstalled and the throttle bodies reassembled. The new fuel pump arrived. New fuel pump and filter assembly by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Had to redo the wires to match the new pump. Different connectors by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr New ends crimped to new wires by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Reassembled, but waiting on new gaskets. Reassembled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr While I was waiting I changed the (zero mile but years old) oil. Went ahead and put a magnet on the drain plug too. The magnet is actually pressed into a recess I lathed into the end of the bolt, the epoxy is just insurance. Neo Magnet on drain plug by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Replaced the air filter. Old vs new air filter by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Couldn't bear to wait for the new gaskets so I reassembled it temporarily with the old ones and voila! Bike started. This was pivotal because at this point I was only into the bike for a hundred or two. Buying tires and battery would only happen if I knew the bike was a runner again. First start in many years by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Now that I knew it wasn't a paperweight I went ahead and ordered a new set of pirelli angels. Pirelli Angel ST new tires by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Of course to get the rear wheel off the exhaust had to come off, and it was badly rusted on. Heat, tools, hammers, swearing, and ratchet straps eventually got it off. It has a D&D pipe, which is quite loud for my tastes. Hmm, I wonder what I have in my pile of leftovers from the old VFR? Stock exhaust by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr A stock pipe! Which is dead silent but just about doubles the weight of the bike so back in the pile it went. I cleaned up and lubed the D&D and reinstalled it. Maybe I'll pick up another Delkevic like I had on the last one. New tire installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr To balance the rear wheel I needed to turn a centering spacer. Rear wheel balance shaft by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Balance shaft installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Balanced out nicely. Then finally the rubber kit for the tank arrived so back off came the tank and all the old gaskets were tossed. These are the new ones. The old ones were dry rotted, cracked, and generally in poor shape. New rubbers by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Haven't bought it a new battery at this point so it's using a spare from an old goldwing I had laying around. Reassembled by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Put in some LED brake light bulbs. LED on the right, halogen on the left. The difference is larger than it looks in the pics, the camera just gets overloaded by the amount of light. LED brake/tail lights by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Adding LED brake/tail bulbs. by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr LED Brake light install by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Then I decided to swap out the R/R. This is the harness I made to put the FH020 on. Yes I know I should solder the yellow wires. I may eventually do that, but this is still plug and play and I found no evidence of corrosion, overheating, looseness, etc. when I looked, and these connectors are in fact much more robust than the ones on my last VFR. I'll just add this to the regular inspection and if they show a need I'll get rid of the connector entirely. New Rectifier/Regulator harness by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Drilled and installed RivNuts into the mount for the new R/R. Riv-Nuts installed to mount new R/R by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Since the stock R/R used acorn nuts on the back to keep from digging into the wire harness I added a layer of anti-chaff wrap to it before installing the new R/R. Anti-chaff cover on main wire harness by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr And here it is installed. New Rectifier/Regulator installed by Uncle Grr!, on Flickr Way back when it first came over to my place we installed heated grips, powerlets, a GPS, a voltage indicator light, and wired up a connector for the trunk to carry lights and power so really there's not much else for me to do on this bike. I bled the brakes (front and rear, not the linked parts; I'll get to that) changed the coolant, replaced a bunch of fasteners and generally gave it a freshening. Rode it a total of 50 miles so far, then the snows hit and now my driveway is 600' of ice. Anyway, good to be back.
    11 points
  6. At this point I am 62 and hope I can throw a leg over a bike for a lot more years to come The first bike I got was a 1970 Honda CT70. It got three years of mowing lawns and sucking up to dad before he surprised me with it during Christmas 1970. I can still hear mom and dad from my bedroom fighting to get it into the house and place it beside the christmas tree. I could not even sneak out to see that was going on since dad had used a rope to tie my door shut. Anyway that was the start of a long love affair with bikes, today I have 10 or so including my 1975 CB400F vintage racer, 1989 CB400F CB1, etc, as well as a couple of VFR750's, a 1990 and 1991. some day would like to have a 1999 VFR800 with the corbin hard bags. We shall see
    11 points
  7. in my 60's, riding since the 70's. Many bikes have come and gone, but the 4th gens have stayed around the longest. Not my favorite "Touring" bike, but it's the one that speaks to my soul the most. It's been a good run, and with luck there will be many more miles ridden. 1980, with everything i owned...
    11 points
  8. It’s a deluxe. 2 miles on the ticker, and a new bike warranty. They are still looking for the cowl, but I have mine from my old bike, just in case. The dealer thinks it’s the last new one in the US. I don’t know how to confirm that.
    11 points
  9. ...if it comes back to you, that's how you know. Queue "Reunited" by Peaches and Herb. I AM GETTING MY 2010 VFR1200F back. I lost my job in 2017 and was forced to sell my VFR1200. Since then, I've moved cross country 4 times, bought/sold about 8 bikes looking for the VFR1200 fizz without success. I'll be damned, I saw a FB Marketplace post from the guy that bought it off of me. I rang him up (always keep those numbers!) and am getting her back. He's only 6 hours away. He's put about 7k miles on in the last 5 years, and appears to have taken reasonable care. I'm excited to get it back home this weekend and get the plastics peeled off to take stock in what needs to be done.
    10 points
  10. My love affair with Honda began in the mid 70's. First Honda was an Amigo 50cc mini bike, then graduated to the huge power of 100cc a Honda SL100! Tearing around bush tracks both of these bikes performed flawlessly. The need for 4 wheels, work, marriage, kids etc.... began a hiatus of 26 years from bikes until 2004 with the purchase of my first of three 6gens. Now at the ripe old age of 65, my current 8gen having done over 86,000k's never ceases to put a smile on my dial! It runs and looks as good as new, I have no future plan of what or when to replace it. What other bike out there offers that magnificent V4 magic, can run happily on standard fuels, offers great tank range, beautiful build quality, great in both sport or touring and has such a stunning look and sound etc, etc....? Cheers and safe riding fellow VFR lovers!
    10 points
  11. My first ride was as a kid on a m8's BSA 175 Bantam on some scrub land out the back of his fathers house. Got the bug from there. Got my freedom aged 16 and bought a Honda moped (50cc) then at 17 passed my test and bought a Suzuki GT250K. Got my first speeding ticket a week later! 🤦‍♂️ Being at school still, I had no money so a cheap 750 was in order next and I ended up, bizarrely, with a '76 Triumph Bonneville 750. Moved quickly onto a sublime Honda CB500-4. All my m8's had 400-4's so mine was faster 😜 Next was the first of 2 Kawasaki Z650's. Followed by 20 years of being a Biker Without a Bike. I worked in a bank after I left school and the suit kept getting trashed on the bike so I had to sell and buy a car. Then I moved overseas, got married etc etc until aged 40 my wife said I should get another bike and that's when I discovered VFR's. Here she is, fresh from the dealer, a 98 which went on to over 130,000 miles. She was my first, I've had another 4 since then, an '08, a '14 VFR1200F (still owned), a white '15 VFR800X Crossrunner and an '18 Crossrunner (still owned). I collect an '01 this Saturday. I'm trying to convince myself I'm 61 years young, but too often it doesn't feel that young.
    10 points
  12. I'm a young 57, started riding in 1982 and bought my first V4 in 1984, a spanking new VF500F. I've been lucky enough to have ridden more or less continually since then.
    10 points
  13. I was surprised to see so many of you donate at the new year to keep vfrd up and running, it put the budget over the top and I have some reserve for this year. Nothing has changed as far as I can see for the coming year, in terms of how much expenses are for VFRD, I found a better server last year and upgraded and it actually was slightly cheaper to run that the old one, but it performs much better. They even have a better backup system then the old server had, the automated routine is so much easier to managed, set it and forget it. I am amazed at how tech improves each year. Thanks for the many group rides, rallys, local events you have all done together in 2021, keep the rubber side down, stay safe and keep on riding - vfr or no vfr! I still have the Veefalo, last year I upgraded the suspension front and back, rebuilt the Ohlins and put in new fork cassettes that have both compression and rebound adjustment. It feels good, now this winter it will be time to change out the coolant, clean up the road grime, and do some maintenance. It needs new shoes, brake pads, and some extra lovin. I also picked up a 2008 KTM Superduke last May. A used KTM and spent alot of time fixing that up too. Now I can have my buddies fly in and ride with me on my spare bike. I have a little 150 Honda PCX too that I ride around town, its a hoot - its the perfect Urban assault vehicle/Grocery getter. I still love to ride motorcycles - and I love VFRD too. Too bad that pesky work thing keeps getting in the way! HA
    10 points
  14. Hello Gentlepeople, I worked with Roy for five years until he retired, and I helped him move from Sydney to Victoria. He was, with out a doubt, the grumpiest SOB at work. He was also one of my favourite colleagues. There was only three or four people at work that he would put up with for more than a few minutes. I think he tolerated me slightly more than most of the rest because I ride. (Suzuki GSX 1400) I doubt Roy ever thought of me as a friend, But he'd often seek me out at work for a chinwag, and he was always receptive to my odd technical questions after hours. I very much enjoyed chinwagging with Roy. About motorcycles, and work, and co workers, and Video games, and just random stuff. And he was just so damn knowledgeable. I can see from a few of his posts here that he was a valued member of your community. (Even tho he did go out and buy an S1000. Which was a glorious machine. I can see it eventually becoming a german equivalent of his frankenviffer) A couple of years ago I was prepping to go to Jindy to meet up with the GSX forum for a weekend zooming around the mountain. I'd never been and I knew it was his favourite playground, so I asked him for some sage advice. He said "It's full of idiots looking at the scenery. Don't ever cross the line for the perfect corner. You get collected" I will miss Roy, even tho we weren't "friends" as such. I learnt a lot from Roy, even after 37yrs* of experience, there's always something to learn. I just hope I can be half as good a rider as Roy thought I was. I hope you don't mind, But I'm going to have a wander through Roys comments and have a bit of a reminisce. *37yrs is a teensy bit of a lie. I got my first motorbike at age Five, started competing at 12, been road riding since I was 16, but got my license at 30. Damned australian police and thier hard on for licensing. 😉
    10 points
  15. Well, after a long search for an 8th gen VFR in white I finally have one. Its pretty well in mint condition. 19,000kms, 2014 VFR Newish Michelin Road 5s Full toolkit and manuals and it came with Honda OEM luggage which I probably will not use. ( If someone is looking for white Honda side luggage send me a PM) Gave a full detail and cleaned the chain and lube yesterday Oil / filter changed and brake fluid flush done at dealer. She's in tip top shape. Didn't expect the bike to feel much different than my 6th gen RWB but it does. More responsive and flickable. Feels more compact due to radiators at front now. I want to be more aggressive with it in the twisties due to lack of width compared to 6th gen LOL. Brakes are superior and low end grunt is noticeable. Basically I luv it. The fact that I do not have to worry about a stator or RR is a big deal to me. To me the bike sounds different and in a better way than my 6th. I have the stock pipe too. Styling wise, while it won't replace my beloved RWB it is more modern looking and in the pearl white what can I say. Its good to back in the pilots seat. Ride safe everyone. Enjoy the pics.
    10 points
  16. I've related this previously - but will again for laughs and giggles. I once dated a woman for a while who, when she first came to my home saw my motorcycles in the garage. As she looked at them she stood pensively and placed her index finger on her lips, then used it to point at the bikes and said "those will have to go". Almost instantly, the thought raced through my mind that said "no, . . . YOU will have to go!!" And in short order she did. Took her home, dropped her off and never saw her again. She would have had an easier time coming between a steak and a hungry shark than between my bikes and me LOL! Now, back to our regularly scheduled build thread.
    10 points
  17. I was glad I went, but I do wish there were more European manufacturers other than KTM--and Honda of course. No Ducati, BMW, Aprilia, Triumph. I was hoping to look at helmets too but only HJC was there. If you've been to these shows before (I haven't), or a major race you've probably seen more vendors. But I guess pulling it off at all this year was an accomplishment. However--the focus was demos, and the roads of southern Sonoma County were crawling with guys (and lots of women!) on demo bikes from all the brands present: So (if Buells don't count) my Livewire ride yesterday was the first time I have ever operated an HD! It was smoother, narrower and lighter (feeling) than it looks. I had ridden a Zero a few years ago so I knew what to expect performance-wise: strong, linear power at all times, not much character but you never get caught in the wrong gear. Yes, I kept trying to downshift coming to a stop. Good fit and finish. Of course the usual problems will prevent me from purchasing: charge time, range, charing station availability, price, can't borrow electrons when you run out, etc. The higher-end electric bicycles have a CVT-type variable transmission in the rear hub, kinda cool. For only the price of a good used 5th gen you too can own this bicycle: The Pan America: incredibly ugly IMHO, retaining the worst styling elements of HD cruisers while looking like a lump. Great, strong engine once I switched to sport mode, comfy seat and riding position. Really weird kickstand design that will probably result in a lot of tipovers. Continuing with HD, the batwing fairing has been taken to new literal extremes. Yes, in the background that's the other RC-51 besides mine at this event, a 2003 also. Grum was here but I must have missed him: Just like today's featured photo, almost! A DCT: Heading home on the best bike at this show, of course!
    10 points
  18. 1990 VFR750F. Bought two days before xmas, 2021. From the OfferUp ad: 1990 Honda VFR 750 $1 Description Needs 1 small part. Make offer or trade. Well... shit. DON'T need another bike. But I gotta inquire. Message the dude thru OfferUp: "Is the title in your name? When was the last time it ran?" Response: "It just needs one small part" "Yeah. I read that. Are you the titled owner and how long since it has ran?" "Yah, I got the title. A few years. Started dumping fuel out of this part when I was trying to start it" OK then, we got some info to go on now. I call him and we talk and he seems like a decent dude. I tell him normally I would just come out and look and talk to you in person. But it was a pretty good trek to check it out, so I tell him that and ask, "so... what do you think you wanna get out of it?" "I don't know, five hundred bucks. I'd probably take 400, I just wanna get back some money I put into it before it got parked." It's on. We make arrangements for DEC 23rd, my first day off for the Holidays. It's a ferry ride over to Kingston with a trailer, so a $30 tab there. Then down the peninsula to Port Orchard. Couple hours easy. Get there and it's a beauty day, so I'm able to roll it out of the spot you see in the above pic. First thing... Fox Twin Clicker. Good start. The 8 spoke wheel is probably worth what I'm paying anyway, so no risk really. It's all there. Tank is off, but it is drained and 100% clean on the inside. Fuck yes. Original Honda key, owner's manual and tool kit. Asked about a seat cowl and he just looked puzzled... "never mind". New chain and sprockets (chain is pretty rusty). Essentially brand new (5 years ago) Michelin Pilot Power tires. Steel braided lines up front. 70K miles... doesn't really matter on these engines. Look down at the shiny oil filter and pop the dipstick. Oil looked like it just came of a bottle. Cool. It got ridden home from the shop and pretty much parked. Notice the drain plug and adjacent oil pan has been drilled... that actually makes me happy. It means somebody might have gone thru the front end to match the rear shock at some point for a track day or few. The forks feel like they have real springs in them and somebody updated to the later fork caps with pre-load adjustment. He shows me the "one small part" it needs. "I think it's some kind of fuel separator or something". I am playing dumb. "yeah? huh." It's a plastic vacuum valve with a broken nipple for the emissions that is gonna end up in the trash anyway. "Fuel was coming out of that broken off part". I know it's just dirty carbs at this point. "you said you'd take $400?" "yep" Exchange money and title / bill of sale and load it up. Not pretty but hey. Every piece of bodywork has issues, but that tank is really nice. Oh yeah, a Corbin... whatever. Decide to make it a big round trip and drive around thru Tacoma (over a toll bridge) and back up thru Seattle. I left around 9am and got home around 3pm. Pretty good day. At least it was a beautiful day for driving. Here's back home after a quick strip. So the winter plan is to clean the carbs and get her running. The carbs are already out and while not great they are not terrible. Very doable. I already have the PAIR system and emission crap eliminated. I bought a 2003 rear wheel to replace the 8 spoke for personal use on my 95 (likely). Then go thru the systems and make it ride-able. Brakes front and rear are sticking and need to be serviced. Hopefully the pistons aren't pitted. Flush the coolant system. I'm sure the fork seals are gonna start leaking the next time I just look at them. I have a plan for adapting a slip-on (D&D), I think it's gonna work perfect. Stock 1993 shock on the way (w/ rebound damping) so I can remove the Fox for rebuild (it still passes the critical seat-bounce test we all learned on showroom floors). New inner / rear fender to replace this hacked unit. Try and go thru the bodywork to make it mount better and look more presentable. Gonna modify the passenger peg brackets to remove the peg portions.
    9 points
  19. Complete brake system rebuild, CeraKote calipers by Sebspeed, new seals and brake pads and lines, new clutch hydraulics, coolant flush and fill, and (re)ceramic coat the manky exhaust system.
    9 points
  20. I'm 45 years old. Plan to ride as long as I can. First bike in 1999, a 91 CBR600F2. First VFR, a 2001 bought new in 2001: Current VFR, another 2001 set up like the first one: Cheers, Justin
    9 points
  21. Finally got all my parts in. Will be assembling on my next days off. Still winter here, so…
    9 points
  22. So I did a thing today. After adding a 2nd bike to the stable about 3 months ago, I added a third today. Gonna have to put some thought into re-organizing the garage. Indian FTR R Carbon.
    9 points
  23. The money shots (I hope)...... Aparently prospective buyers in the Netherlands want OEM, so I give 'm OEM (as much as I can) Pity I sold the OEM rearsets and clutch master years ago). Underneath her clothes are a PowerCommanderV, K-Tech SSK, MOSFET RR, K&N airfilter, new Yuasa. Comes with pillion seat PM me if interested.
    9 points
  24. I just acquired this 2014 8th Gen. So Far, So Amazing. All the 6th Gen Goodness in a slightly tidier, more modern package. I couldn't be happier. I'm posting today to jump back in the pool and ask: Does anyone have an electronic version of the Shop Manual for the 2014 800F model to share? Thats it for now and let the customizations(tasteful) begin...
    8 points
  25. Hello everyone! I wanted to share my story of becoming a VFR owner and some of my early struggles. I started to browse this forum as soon as I understood that my next purchase will be a 6th gen VFR – a noticeable upgrade from my humble Honda NTV ’93, which I loved, but felt the need to upgrade for sport-touring type of vehicle. At the very start I set my eyes on the 5th gen model, since I liked the sound of gear driven cams, riding comfort and the looks. Which is why I searched everywhere for one and since I’m from Latvia, “Everywhere” meant nearby countries and Germany. While I was still figuring out my finances, one popped up 70km from my hometown, but since I wasn’t able to buy it outright, I pitched the idea to my friend, who was aiming for a 6th gen at a time. We went to check it out and he bought this beauty with 30k kilometers on the clock: Now he is in love with it and it’s understandable – great motorcycle in perfect shape. Afterwards I got a chance to work overtime and earn the much needed cash for trading up – the hunt for my new bike was on! While looking around I was still mainly interested in owning a blue 2001 VFR800, which looks great in this color and has no choke lever or bulky mirrors. But since budget had grown and I could afford to spend 4000 EUR on my new ride (that includes selling my old girl), I started to take liking to the 6th gen models – that rear end is juicy 😄 After three weeks of searching, one popped up in Lithuania, 140km from my home – it was right on the budget, leaving me nothing for unexpected expenses, but boy was it mint.. This 2003’ blue beauty had only 14K kilometers on the clock, no rust, OEM side luggage and aftermarket windscreen. Test ride was rough, since it had been raining, but I felt out what I could and even tried out the VTEC system, since way too many people have complained of it being to rough on 2002 model. (side note, after a couple months of riding my VFR, I can confidently say that I love the VTEC transition – it is addicting and makes me smile) Even though I had some doubts about this bike being heavier and bulkier than my starter motorcycle and a slight worry about maintenance since I’d have to disassemble the fairings, which was a first for me – I pulled the trigger and bought it. Purchase was made in July, so I decided to just change the oil, oil filter and enjoy the season. Fairing removal was very scary for the first few times 😄 The only upgrade I had to do was purchasing a PUIG attachable windshield extension, since I was getting pummeled by turbulence. While it was expensive, it improved the riding comfort immensely. First few months were slightly worrying since I was now in completely different riding position and the bike hadn’t broken me in yet – I had back aches and was even contemplating selling it if nothing changed. Luckily I got used to my new partner and had an amazing fall season. In late autumn I prepared the bike for storage approximately 5 times since I kept pushing the season longer 😄 But after winter came I parked it for good and started to make a to-do list for maintenance. I knew about wiring issues which were present before 2006 so I ordered the VFRness. An expensive but necessary upgrade. I think I paid like 160 EUR total to get it shipped to me. Also I couldn’t look at my fork dust seals for they had cracks in them from prolonged storage (14k of riding for a 03’ motorcycle has it’s downsides). Wiring in general had to be refreshed buy cleaning all the accessible connectors. While working on a stripped bike and adding the VFRness I noticed many damaged rubber grommets so they had to go. What also reared it’s ugly head, was the fact that my bike had been in a collision which damaged the plastic mounts on my speedometer. Now I knew why it had a fancy new windshield.. So I kept working on refreshing or fixing everything I found to be less than perfect and after adding the switchable circuit VFRness I started to wonder on what accessories could I add and how to mount them. Which is when I found out about the elusive HISS bracket 😄 Why elusive you ask? Because the only guy who makes them, doesn’t ship to my country.. So I made one for myself using Fusion 360 Once the bracket was mounted, I had to fill the new mounting sockets with something 😄 So I bought a gear indicator from AliExpress and a Voltmeter / USB charger (both light up in green so they match). A friend helped me to 3D print a holder for the gear indicator and did a terrific job of it: After adding both VRFness and HISS bracket, I opted to also install heated grips, but in the cheap way 😄 I ordered a kit from AliExpress which had to be modified to fit, but I am used to soldering so it was fine. (These are only useful on high setting, but they do help a lot when I’m riding off season – 5 degrees Celsius is perfectly fine for me now). While at it, I also added aftermarket levers and figured out a way to fit a RAM mount. I took the idea from this forum, but had to make my own ball mount since original one was too low and I risked damaging paint on my gas tank. I also decided to strip paint from my bar-ends 😄 And that’s all folks – now I am already sneaking in a few spring rides in anticipation of an approaching new season which will no doubt bring me many great memories with my mates and my beloved motorcycle 🙂
    8 points
  26. Chief Joseph Scenic Byway This isn't a great time of year for riding in my neck of the woods so I thought I'd share this short video for the rest of you unable to enjoy getting out for a ride. Hope you like it. Btw, the funky framing is my fault for setting the horizon with the bike on its side stand - d'oh! A month after buying my new-old-stock '09 VFR800 I was winging my way south en route to Laguna Seca. But as usual on my trips I took the shortcut, this time via Yellowstone NP. Day 4 we left Cooke City for a ride over Beartooth Pass, then backtracked so we could ride over Chief Joseph Scenic Byway (Hwy 296) on our way to Cody, Wyo., for breakfast. About 22 km/15 mi east of Cooke City on US212 is the junction with Chief Joseph highway which runs another 74 km/45 mi before terminating at Hwy 120. Cody, Wyo. is a short 25 km/15 mi south. Chief Joseph does't get as much attention as Beartooth Pass, perhaps because it has a more open feel, but the scenery is stunning especially on bright morning like we had. Having ridden it both directions I think the view is better eastbound, but both are equally fun to ride.
    8 points
  27. I'll be 74 in May 2022. Feeling like I'm twenty years older. Arrg!
    8 points
  28. Wow - some really great albums of previous 2 wheel loves - I can't hold a candle. All my riding prior to V-4's was on dirt bikes and photos of those are long gone. I do have a couple of pics of my 4th gen - after I sold it the buyer took it to Texas and totaled it. She was a sweet bike - wish I'd kept it. The 2 Brothers slip on lives on with a high mount on my 5th gen I traded for.
    8 points
  29. This here is my first bike, a CB125T. I was all set to buy something bigger but my Dad intervened and offered to pay for half, provided all I got was a 125...I waited until he went overseas and upgraded to a 250, 6 months later.
    8 points
  30. As much as I hate to say it I think the current 8th gen will be the last of the V4 Sport tourers from Honda. With electric bikes coming in and Europe practically wanting to ban motorcycles outright the future looks bleak. ADV bikes are not for me. These VFRs just make all the right noises. I'll be honest I can go out and buy any bike out there but the VFR checks off all the right boxes for me from looks to engine to handling. Its an all day sport bike for me. These 8th gens are keepers and I'm glad I snagged one. One of my last rides last year was with an Aprilia V4, Ducati V4 streetfighter and Panigale V2. We rode for 3 hours in the twisty rural roads and the VFR performed like a champ. I know for sure after that ride my body was the least fatigued. LOL I'm not saying I will never sell it but the question is what could I buy to replace it. Currently nothing out there for me. Looking forward to the 2022 riding Season. Cheers.
    8 points
  31. Received some pictures from the Picos Rally... At the finish of the 5,000 curves/500+ km day ride
    8 points
  32. After several months of nothing but unpacking, cleaning and home-improvements, I finally made it out for ride! Went up past Canyon Lake to Tortilla Flat this last Sunday!
    8 points
  33. Hi All. Whilst stumbling through some old photos I found a sentimental favourite. The first photo of my first VFR after just getting her home 16 years ago, April 2005. Shame about the ugly bloke behind the bike, kind of destroys a nice bike photo. Did 56,000k's, only issue was the Crispy Critter Stator at 49,000k's otherwise a great bike. Sold it in 2008 after falling in love with the limited edition 2007 RWB. A registration check tells me this bike is still roaming the streets somewhere. Sure would love to see it again. Cheers.
    8 points
  34. People who don't understand the importance of fuel efficiency and range have never ridden so far out there that if they ran out of gas they would die trying to walk back to civilization.
    8 points
  35. The minimum is still 15. There was a misunderstanding with the builder but ultimately the builder's pipe supplier is the culprit here. That being said, sfdownhill and I are taking a little break from this for the moment. Never say never but probably won't be for a while, if we do go again. This last run seemed to take forever just to get in the orders and then to get them completed seemed prolonged as well. I'm glad to be part of it and can't thank everyone enough for being patient and even purchasing them. Also like to add a big thanks to CornerCarver, his loaning us his 2 Bros headers helped this all get off the ground. Cheers
    8 points
  36. Ah thanks for the warm welcome! Pictures as requested. The bike is a late 2007, just ticked over 20k miles in the week I've had it. Service history was fairly meticulous until 2018 when it went to the guy I bought it off, who didn't service it, but only did about 800 miles in 4 years. I've changed the oil and air filter, and plan to do the coolant, but will be dodging the brake fluid change for sure haha! Mostly standard but has Staintune cans, Motad stainless downpipes, which sound absolutely awesome. Also a nice custom seat, and Oxford heated grips. My first heated grips woohoo. I was very unhappy with the low speed throttle response, but have done the PAIR mod and that's made an enormous difference. Also got o2 eliminators on older so will see what effect they have. Not planning on buying a piggyback ECU at this stage. Next step is to fit a new tank pad and line it up properly, the one it has now is wonky as you can see in the pictures
    7 points
  37. 71 last year and still going strong I started on an old New Hudson with handchange riding around some waste ground/bombsite and bought my first bike on my 13th birthday, a 125cc D1 BSA Bantam Had literally 100’s of different bikes almost exclusively European, gave that up when they became collectible and moved on The RC79 is my first viffer, absolutely love it, so f**king complicated though so bought the RC24 to actually wield a spanner on with confidence
    7 points
  38. ...dont trust five year old rubbers. These cushion-drives were 22 years 'new'.... Sorry Dad....I should have listened... In my never-ending quest to just work on my bike instead of riding it, rear cushion rubbers were ordered. Now there was certainly slop on the rear sprocket carrier - about 10 degrees of rotation in either direction without much effort. So I wasnt just feeding my American desire to buy things for the dopamine hit. ....ANYWAYS. Here's a how-to for those who dont know how-to-do. 1) Tool Up Get you a chungus 46mm socket. Home depot doesn't have it, Ace doesn't have it, and Harbor Freight had it only in a set of eight other chungus sizes that you will certainly never need in the future for ($40) so... To the Internet! Thank you Dewalt for the new paperweight ($25 ) It weighs like three pounds. I love it. Mine was 3/4" drive, so a 1/2" to 3/4" converter was needed as well. ($3) 2) Do as I say, not as I do. ...of all the "mechanics gore" I have seen on forums, I never thought I would turn to the dark side. few taps of the hammer on the wood drill bit raised the notched lip of the carrier nut so it can be loosened. - I would recommend using literally any other tool other than a drill bit to do so. Your only limitation is your imagination. (YMMV.) - Shaft and nut are right-hand threaded, so don't get any funny ideas. Lefty-Loosey with a breaker bar, and you're golden. - Dont misplace that washer either. (Tip: passenger grab-rails suffice as hangers for the nut and washer ;D) 3) The main event. Actually removing the carrier. Now I have heard from my FB post on this topic that this carrier comes right off with just a little elbow grease. This was far from my experience. Lots of hammering (from both sides), grunting, and a well-deserved beer later... I asked FB for ideas. Best advice on there was using a deadblow hammer, mandating another trip to Home Depot ($40). After no luck with thwacking the carrier itself with my new toy, I started to hit the axle shaft itself with it. It started to budge - I also realized this is pushing my wheel outwards, and I may find myself in a *real* situation should I hammer out too far - tumping the bike over, hammer in hand, making this 200lb monkey very sad. So if you dare to do it my way, tap BACK on the wheel to push it back into place after 0.5" of motion or so.... then tap tap on the carrier until... 4) Taa Daa! Everything tumbled off and out. Time for the cleanup and rebuild! All of the old rubbers were hardly petroleum based anymore... they felt fossilized.... maybe Dad was right... Dont forget to inspect that bearing. Mine was slow to move, but smooth in action... so Its time has yet to come.... not bad for 63,000 miles. If you got this far, you could probably put it back together. I have faith in you. only seven parts in total if you count the cushion drives as one. Twerk nut to 148ft-lbs. Epilogue: Resultant assembly is SOLID. Firm with less than one degree of radial slop. I cannot wait to get this chain riveted and experience the new response of my driveline! Lessons Learned/ Tips: - Keep that center stand as a doorstop if you plan to chuck it. This is one of the few jobs I have attempted that would have been MUCH easier with it. Oh well. - Chain OFF. Was in the midst of the 520 chain conversion I posted about long ago, and 2400 miles away, so that was no biggie. - Read somewhere that the chungus nut is a one-time dealio. It probably is with the notch in its lip, but Im picking my battles, you pick yours. Refer to the title of Section 2 for further wisdom. -Anti-seize on that axle shaft! ...or lithium grease...or whatever your favorite high-pressure metallic grease is. I'm certain other's have their favorite lubricants for this item. Dad always said "Lube makes everything better". P.S. This job is certainly a lot less complicated that I am making it out to be. Most of the work was getting the proper tooling, and finessing the rear carrier to give way. If needed to again, It could be accomplished in under 30 minutes, with cleanup, retorque, and a 5 minute beer break. Shiny side up, Rubber side down, folks!
    7 points
  39. I must say I’m a very excited new owner! Makes the most amount of sense in my life right now. Not a full touring sled, and not an uncomfortable supersport. My last bikes were 09 R1 and an 02 RC51. I’m ready to comfortably put the wife on the back and still have a sporty ride! If that isn’t grown up I don’t know what I’ve got to do. Lol
    7 points
  40. This was just following a polish from a wonderful Forum member from the VFR owners club in the Netherlands. Fantastic work. And i imagine this is what she looked like coming off the showroom floor. My god. @jroberts427 special tag just for you 😉 PS added a cheeky Swiss alps pic as well.
    7 points
  41. Thanks Guys, Yea, Im an addict. Space is the only thing that stops me from being a Hoarder to be honest, I have thought of putting a second level in my other Barn/Garage and filling it with bikes, I figure I could get over 70 more in there easy. But, given that im a bit OCD with my stuff It would likely drive me mad not being able to keep 'em all maintained, running and shiny etc. But hey, there are worse things to be addicted to and its largely a self funding hobby if you buy right. So all in all, Im good with it. Few pics of the other bikes... 86 Honda NS400R - 2 stroke V3 1984 Honda CBX750 (restoration this winter all being well). Very Rare in North America VF1000R (Now sold) I restored a few years ago in the Euro colours. Had to rebuild the transmission on this one as well My other VF1000R (now sold) - Light resto on this one but had to do a full frame swap as the frame it arrived with had a rebuilt title. Here's one of the VF500 Interceptor's I built and customized in to a "VF500R" (now Sold). Mainly cosmetics, I cut the fairing to allow use of lower clip-ons. I trimmed the fairings, cut the front fender way down, cut the windshield 4", added a Lockhart lower fairing, rothmans Honda graphics, faux solo seat in white vinyl, Chinese mufflers, bar end mirrors
    7 points
  42. My headers arrived unscathed! Mr. Squiggle did a very thorough job of packing, and he even threw in all the hardware, gaskets, and aluminum Sebspeed center stand stop that he had collected for the header! 😆 Due to the fact that now is coming into some of our best riding here (cool mornings/evenings, warm afternoons, mountain roads open and clear, many days still sunny) and due to a lot of my spare funds currently going to my Suzuki Cappuccino restoration project, I will probably install these and work on a tuning solution sometime this winter. Here's a few photos of the big sturdy box, and the headers out of the box on the kitchen floor. And before someone asks, yes, that is a dirt bike wheel in the front entry of my place. 😜
    7 points
  43. Not today but Sunday - rode it (in the rain!) to the the famous Ace Cafe in North London for the Honda Owner's Club UK's 60th Anniversary Honda Day. Quite a few bikes there of all sizes and ages from Cubs to Gold Wings. Mine not looking bad for 50,000 miles plus.
    7 points
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