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  1. Racetrack? Deals Gap? Just a great shot one of your buddies captured for you that you really like? Let's see your glamour shot of your vfr doing vfr stuff. This has always been one of my favorites. Everybody knows you don't have to go fast at Deal's Gap for the amazing photographers to make you look good. This is no exception. Fairly clean run on a rainy weekday with my buddy on a far superior machine (he thinks so, anyway 😉 ) giving chase. I know a lot of guys are way faster than me. I'm not pretending to be anything special. But damn, talk about lipstick on a pig... Magoo
    14 points
  2. My fascination with V4 power started back in 1999. I was still new to riding back then. Having been influenced by an older co-worker as well as a good friend, I purchased my first bike, a 91 CBR600F2. I was having fun, gaining some experience and trying to stay out of trouble. Soon after, that same buddy of mine imported two bikes via the grey market: an NSR250 and an RVF400, the latter resembling a miniature RC45. He let me ride both before he sold them. The RVF with it’s tiny V4 had this unique sound and power band. I was immediately hooked. About a year later I sold the F2 and bought a 2001 VFR800 new off the showroom floor. I quickly added a Staintune high mount exhaust and a Sargent seat, and then proceeded to ride about 26,000 miles over the next 5 years. I was living in Northern California at the time. Weekends comprised of trips to the coast, mountains, commuting, etc. I loved that bike with the power delivery and the sound it made. I went on some great rides and made some great memories. When my first child was born I thought I’d better slow down and be more responsible so I sold the VFR and settled into the idea that I’d probably never own a bike again. Too much risk I thought. Over the years I built a few cars, dabbled in some other hobbies, told my kids stories of riding and how much fun it was. About that time I did a track day at Laguna Seca, and the time I topped it out in Death Valley, only to get pulled over 20 miles outside of Las Vegas for doing 15 over. Thought it would be great to get another bike, if only to have that V4 sound in my garage again. Fast forward some twenty years to 2020. My older brother gets a VTX1300. “Hey man why don’t you take it for a spin?” “Nah, too big for me, besides I’ll never ride again. Too many distracted drivers, people texting not paying attention, etc.” He nods silently “How bad is it?” I inquired with some curiosity but still trying to justify my position, “Do you feel like people are gonna run you over every day or anything?” “Nope, not really” “Hmmmm…………interesting…..” Something to know about me is I have the unique ability to talk myself in or out of anything. If I spend enough time thinking about a certain venture, stuff just materializes. I decided it was time to recreate a memory. I went to the VFR forums and online classifieds looking for another bike, just like mine. Had to be a 2001 due to a few changes that were made when compared to the 98/99 models. Last year of the gear driven cams. Not interested in the VTEC models. 2000 would have been fine but the US only got yellow that year and my eyes just can’t handle that much yellow. Besides, everyone knows that red is faster. That’s been proven. Just ask the Ducati guys. Sent my brother a text with a picture of a potential candidate for sale: “You’re a bad influence. Just sayin’” “lol” His simple yet affirming reply I looked for several months, spoke with a few sellers. Surprisingly the 2001 models were a little hard to come by but a few popped up. Some had higher miles, some had accident damage, some were a little overpriced, some were too far away on the East coast. But then I got tipped off about a bike listed on a different forum. Looked really clean, only 21k miles, some nice mods, priced really well and only two states away. I scrambled to create a user profile on the forum. “I’ll take it!” I posted. “Cash in hand and PM inbound.” That was a Sunday. I spoke with the seller the next day. Hung up the phone and bought a plane ticket for a place called Manhattan, Kansas. I had to look that one up. “The little apple”, the seller joked. I spent the next few days getting things in order. New helmet, gloves, jacket, ear plugs, Ibuprofen, etc. I mapped out the journey. 999.2 miles per Google maps. I would travel due West from Manhattan, KS through the Colorado Rockies into Southern Utah and then North-West toward my home in Utah County. I wondered about the weather, particularly in the mountains of Colorado as they had been pummeled with snow about two weeks prior. The weather report called for 70s in Denver and 50s in the mountains. Road cameras showed clear highways. What luck! Let’s do this! Friday found me on a plane bound for my first stop in DFW, TX. I sat next to a young lady who was travelling to Puerto Rico with her boyfriend. “I’m flying to Kansas to pick up a motorcycle and ride it home” I told her. “I bought one just like it brand new 20 years ago.” “Well I’m 21.” she replied with a slightly perplexed millennial’s smile. I laughed to myself and thought about how I was “in my prime” at that age. Young, single, confident, I still had hair on my head. (Remember those days?) I’m only 45 but part of me still longs for the good old days, until I remember that I’m actually in the good old days right now, just a different version. I have a house, a stable job, and fantastic kids. One day I will miss these days my dad reminds me. And I know he’s right. She told me how they had purchased a bike about a year earlier. Totaled it 3 hours after purchase when a driver turned left in front of them. She showed me the pics on her phone. Both came away with only minor injuries. “It could have been a lot worse” she said. A sober reminder to always be vigilant on a bike. I had a few hours at DFW before my flight. Got some lunch and then found my gate. Settled in to check the news, people watch, and wait for the flight to board. I saw an older woman close by sitting in a chair with small wheels, not anything she could push by herself. She was missing her left leg, right at the knee. She looked miserable. Stranded. Left alone and forgotten. I put my phone away, mustered up a little courage, cleared my throat and walked over. “Can I give you a hand with anything?” “I’m really hungry” she said, glancing over at the vending machine. “Let’s get you something.” I released the brakes on her chair and pushed her over to the machine. She started to look for some change in her pocket. “I’ll take care of it. Anything you want.” I said. She wasn’t fussy. Just a Coke, a pastry and some chips. She seemed genuinely grateful. We spent the next hour talking. Victoria was 50 years old and from Houston. Truth be told, she looked much older. She had short brown hair and she was missing several teeth. He clothes looked like they had just been pulled from a pile at Goodwill. Something someone else had thrown away. She’d never been out of Texas, hadn’t done much. Had a rough childhood and most of her adult life was spent in the clutches of drugs and alcohol. Never one for subtlety I inquired about her missing limb, “What happened, you kick the dog too many times?” “I’ve been in the hospital the past 3 months. They took my leg. I’m diabetic and too much drugs.” she explained. “My dad’s gone, well my step-dad.” She paused and took a long look out the window. “He was my best friend. But my momma’s still alive. I’ll go and stay with her a while.” I asked about her life, and mostly just listened. “I used to be good at art” her eyebrows raised slightly from a rare, good memory then settled back down into her reality, “but it is what it is. I can’t remember much these days.” “Everyone has struggles,” I said hoping to offer some reassurance. “I think everyone could write a book about their life and experiences. And look on the bright side, you’ll save money on shoes!” I said with a wink. She eeked out a laugh while eating her Ruffles. I left her in the hands of a caring airline employee who assured me that she would get her on the plane ok. And that she did. I left thankful to have met her, and more thankful for what I had waiting at home for me. Soon it was time for me to board. I hopped on a small plane headed for Kansas. I overheard another passenger say they had to remove the pesticide sprayers to convert our crop duster into a commercial airliner. He wasn’t far off. It was cozy but got the job done. I was tempted to poke my head into the cockpit and say “I just want to tell you both good luck. We're all counting on you,” in tribute to the late Leslie Nielsen but I chickened out. In hindsight I should have went for it. Instead I proceeded back and found my seat next to a retired Kindergarten teacher from South Carolina who was flying in to see her grandkids. Her name was Kathy, like my mom. “Easy to remember that one,” I said. “My son-in-law is stationed at the base there. Hopefully he doesn’t have to go overseas again. He spent 9 months in Afghanistan on one tour. The baby was born while he was away” she said pensively. “What’s the best thing about being a Kindergarten teacher?” I asked. She didn’t hesitate at all, “Showing up to work every day and feeling loved.” Now I was the pensive one. I like what I do but it’s not like that. Hmmm… Upon landing she wished me a safe ride and I wished her a happy Easter with her grandkids. At the airport I shot a text to the seller’s son who lived close by and had offered to pick me up. “Give me 5 minutes. Red Chevy truck with a KTM front plate” he replied. I could tell right away that Tyler was a good kid. He had sunglasses and a slightly sunburned face from time spent outside. He was polite and well-spoken, like his dad. Gave me the impression that he’d been raised right. Said he worked a lot of hours driving truck, local not over the road. Had bought a Yamaha Tenere 700 recently to do some adventure riding with his brother and their dad. Said it was time to sell the VFR after having owned it for 7 or 8 years. In a few minutes time we arrived at the house and there she was propped up on the center stand. By now it was about 5pm on Friday. My goal was to make it home by late Saturday night so as not to miss Easter morning with my kids. We got right to business. “I installed the rear cowl for you and lubed the chain. Oil level is good and looks amber through the glass,” Tyler said, his riding experience evident. Like I said, a good kid. He threw in the tank bag and a Ram mount for my phone at no extra charge, knowing I would use both on the ride home, which I did. “Oh yeah, the front headlight blinks during the day with a sensor and it’s got a train horn on it,” he says. He gave the horn button a quick blip and I immediately realized he wasn’t joking. Two tones and what had to be more than 120 decibels. Too funny. But I could see how it would be useful. Got the title and bill of sale, gave the bike a quick once over, donned my new gear as the engine warmed up. Gave Tyler a handshake and hopped on the VFR, for the first time in 15 years. Put my hands on the grips and took a quick moment to question my decision and the journey ahead. “Just take it easy, you got this,” I thought. Tyler looked like he was uncertain if I’d really make it all the way home as I had planned. I was a little unsure myself. I double checked my helmet, pulled in the clutch lever, clicked down one for first and eased down the steep driveway and onto the street. First impressions: This thing sounds great. And how did I ever live without Helibars?! Oddly enough getting back on was “just like riding a bike” as they say. Go figure. I acclimated quickly. Two tenths of a mile down, only 999 miles to go. Now, I had brought a throttle lock I harvested off my brother’s VTX in a rush the night before. The Vista cruise I ordered from Amazon wouldn’t arrive on time. My brother’s throttle lock turned out to be too big and wasn’t going to work and I dreaded making this trip without something to hold the throttle in place. Luckily there was a bike shop near the seller’s house and they were still open for a few minutes. They sold me a throttle lock, set my tire pressure at 36 and 42, and even gave me a tire pressure gauge for the trip. “How far you headed?” “Trying to be in Salt Lake City by tomorrow night.” “We did a ride to Toronto last year” he said. “That guy made the trip on an RC51!” pointing to one of the mechanics who gave an awkward smile back confirming the accusation. Suddenly my VFR was a Goldwing by comparison. “Thanks gentlemen! Really appreciate it!” “Ride safe!” they said as they resumed closing up shop. That was 6pm on Friday. I stopped to top off the bike with fuel and get bearings on how to get to the freeway a few miles away. Gently got it up to speed and settled into 6th gear at around 60mph. Then this happened: Holy cow this helmet is loud!! I had forgotten to put in my ear plugs and the wind noise was extreme. Pulled over just before the freeway on ramp to rectify the situation. An older gentleman in a farm truck stopped and asked if everything was ok and if I needed any help. “No I’m good, thanks though.” He waved and drove off. With ear plugs in place I rolled onto the freeway thinking, so far, every person I’ve met in this state has been absolutely stellar. Very cool. On the freeway once again I settled in at 6th gear, 70 mph or so. Love the Helibars, not sure about the double bubble windscreen. It seems the wind hits right at my helmet. At 5 foot 8 I can’t really get above the buffeting. And with the tank bag I couldn’t really get below it. No worries, I can dial that in later. Right now I have several hours of Kansas freeway to tackle. A decent side wind made things interesting but subsided as it got closer to dark. I chased the sunset, pulling over for fuel and to change into my cold weather gear when the temps dropped. For those of you who have never experienced Kansas, let me tell you something. This place is flat, like really flat. Like I looked across the horizon and I could see the back of my head flat. And straight. Hardly a curve or a hill to spice things up. Nothing against the land or it’s people, just not what I’m used to having grown up in NorCal and Utah surrounded by 11,000 foot snow covered peaks. I had driven through West Texas once and that was flat too, unlike anything I’d ever experienced before. Lots of corn fields though. But I trudged on. With my old VFR I could get more than 200 miles on a tank if I recall correctly. Something like 42-45 mpg typically. So I thought I would see how far I could go before filling up. The seller had installed a new front sprocket but couldn’t remember if it was down one tooth or what. The rear sprocket was stamped 43 so we were good there. Couldn’t see the front as it is blocked. The seller had also installed a device to correct the speedometer reading which matched my GPS so that looked good. I kept an eye on the fuel gauge. Around mile 168 on the odometer the reserve started flashing. Hmmmmm…not too many gas stations around here amidst the corn fields. At about 180 miles on the odo I finally found a gas station and filled up. It took 4.7 gallons which worked out to 38 mpg. Interesting. To be safe I figured I would just fill up at around 140-150 miles. Throughout the trip the MPG was a bit of a mystery. Across the trip I saw 38, 36, 44, 49 (downhill stretch), and 43, oddly enough averaging out to 42 overall. I don’t know. The thing ran great though. Smooth and powerful and flawless. Stopping at 140-150 miles had another benefit. I could stop and stretch. After so many miles I noticed a few things: my wrists were fine. Lower back was fine. Ankles were fine. It was the shoulders and the lower glutes that were in pain. I googled up the top 10 shoulder stretches and did some variant of that at each stop. It made a big difference. Would have killed to have my Sargent seat again. But I do have a new one coming in the mail. Here’s something I forgot about, the digital coolant temp reading was generally about 100* F higher than the air temp. I remember my old VFR was like that. Cool that you can toggle between the two on the gauge cluster. I rode into the dark until it was too cold. Stopped and got some IHOP for dinner and booked a room at a nearby hotel that had good reviews. Called the wife to check in and give a report of the trip so far, plugged in my phone and helmet Bluetooth to charge and went to sleep just after midnight. I woke up at around 7am, took a shower and had some of the hotel’s continental breakfast and headed out. The morning temps were cool at first but with the rising sun came warmer temperatures. And eventually the Colorado border. For future travelers it’s worth noting here that Eastern Colorado is just an extension of Kansas. There’s even a small town near the border called Kanorado. It’s the same landscape! But the road is smoother on the Kansas side. Just as straight and flat though. I caught my first glimpse of the rocky mountains about 100 miles off in the distance. Remember this: if you’re doing this trip, the rockies of Colorado are the reward for enduring the flatness of Kansas. Just hang in there, it gets better! I laughed to myself as I quoted a few lines in my helmet from the movie Dumb and Dumber, where there is some debate about the Colorado mountains and the rockiness therein. As I recall, John Denver’s integrity is questioned at one point. I continued on I-70 and rode past downtown Denver. Pulled in for fuel and lunch at Subway, and to do my stretches. Filled up at a grocery store gas station called King Soopers that had a large banner that read #boulderstrong. Took a moment to think of the Boulder situation that happened recently. Just regular shoppers like the people around me, stopping in for hotdogs or milk or bread, who never went home that day. I guess I need to carry everywhere now. Thankful I still have the right and ability to protect myself and my family. Many people in the world don’t. I ate my lunch outside but went in the Subway to clean my helmet shield real quick. Got mildly harangued by a thirty-something Subway employee for sitting at a table that was marked as closed due to Covid and social distancing. Hmmm… Didn’t she notice that all of the tables were marked that way? And that there was virtually no one else in the restaurant? “I won’t be long.” I said. She seemed satisfied with my response and let me be. I quickly cleaned up my helmet and set off again. I had made it halfway, only 499 miles left to go. Now things were about to get fun. Several hours and miles of elevation and gentle curves through some amazing landscape. Can I make it to Grand Junction? Will I make it home tonight? Wow look at those mountains!! Hey there are a lot of Audis on this stretch. And tunnels!! Buckle up Todo we’re not in Kansas anymore! For those of us who appreciate appropriate exhaust scavenging, there is a specific process or tradition if you will, that happens when approaching a tunnel. In my foxbody Mustang for example: windows down, slow slightly, downshift into 3rd and hit it til redline, all in a safe and prudent manner of course. Repeat as necessary. The bike is equally fun but you have to watch the speed as redline in virtually any gear is exceeding posted limits. The Eisenhower Tunnel is 1.6 miles long. Ooh I’m gonna like this (activate stupid grin). Assess traffic, slow down slightly, click down a few gears and hit it. VrrrRRRRRRROWW!! Now in the interest of safety didn’t take it all the way to the VFR’s near 12,000 rpm redline but I did ring it out a bit. Just enough to hear that V4 song resonate out the Vance & Hines pipe and reverberate through the tunnel walls. I quickly let off the throttle, regained composure and washed that down with a couple of hits from my train horn and I was good for the next several miles until another opportunity (that is to say, tunnel) came my way. I could say with some certainty that the young couple in the Kia next to me appeared to be glad that their windows had remained up in the Eisenhower. He didn’t appear to have down shifted either. And it was a Kia. Poor girl. It was all downhill from there. Literally. Things warmed up as I descended in elevation like a pilot coming in for a landing. Almost made it to Glenwood Springs when I just had to pull over for a break. My right shoulder wasn’t having it anymore and the numbness in the Southern quarters indicated a need for some blood flow. I pulled over, put the kickstand down in the dirt and sat on a concrete block for a bit. Stretched out and popped a couple of Ibuprofen. Counted a group of 5 riders on kitted up BMW GS’s cruising by on the freeway in front of me. That looked like fun as well. A local kid on a quad came by to investigate. Not much to see, he turned and left without a word. I pressed on and stopped in at Glenwood Springs for fuel. An older gentleman approached me. “Is that one of the new VFRs?” he said with a slight accent that I couldn’t immediately place. “Nope, it’s a 2001. She’s 20 years old” I smiled. “I have a VFR1200” he returned, “Great bike. Ride safe!” “Will do, thank you Sir.” I was taught in my youth to be respectful of older people. Many of them served in past war efforts and helped preserve the freedoms I now have. They have great experiences and stories. That was another thing I was getting used to again, biker comradery. Lots of waves on the highway and instant conversation at the gas station. Hey I remember this. This is cool. On this next bit I made a slight mistake. I had packed an old Go Pro thinking I might do a little filming at some point. I wondered about the stretch from here to Grand Junction but decided to forego in the interest of time. Well, that proved to be some of the most spectacular riding of the entire trip. Sorry guys. You’re just gonna have to experience it for yourselves. It was amazing though. Great cliffs and rocky ledges, and the road following the Colorado river for miles. It was beautiful all the way into Utah. I stopped in at Grand Junction for fuel and more stretches. Sat on some concrete with my back against a brick wall and was more physically comfortable that I’d been for the past several miles. Orange Fanta and beef jerky never tasted so good. Took a few minutes to rest and then saddled up again. Nightfall would be coming before too long and I had 279 miles to go. Before I left home I purchased a Bluetooth unit to go with my helmet. I hadn’t used it much of the trip but decided to have some tunes for the final stretch. It works fine but I need to do a little fine tuning I guess. I have to have earplugs because of the wind noise, so that means I have to be at or near full volume on the unit to hear the music. I think if I can get the wind buffeting dialed in it will be better. I was able to talk on the phone for a bit on the highway and it worked fine. So that was cool. Never did that before on a bike. May never do it again but it was cool to see that it worked as intended. I am a lifelong guitarist of sorts so my playlist is varied. Tool, followed by Johnny Cash with some Depeche Mode, Daft Punk and Bon Jovi mixed in got me through Southern Utah and pointed toward home. Two good things about Southern Utah: 80 degrees and 80mph speed limit. I set my throttle lock on 85 and went for it. The bike ran flawlessly, gobbling up mile after mile and begging for more. I had no plate on the bike so I didn’t want to risk getting pulled over (nor did I want to increase the risk of dying in a crash or scratching up my new bike) so I kept things pretty reasonable. Cruised past the turn off for Moab and Arches National Park and I was now in my back yard so to speak. Last fill up in Green River and a quick text to the wife: “Should be home by 10pm”. I hung a right onto Hwy 6 and headed North toward home. I watched the sunset on my left as I climbed through Price and into Spanish Fork Canyon, praying the whole time that a deer didn’t run out in the dark, which thankfully one didn’t. Pulled over in Spanish Fork for one final stretch and some water. Just 45 minutes from home now, somewhat surprised I had made it this far without incident. Pulled down my face shield, set the playlist again and hopped on the freeway. Bounced over the concrete slabs for the next 30 miles to my exit. Left over the overpass, cruise for a few miles, then left again toward my neighborhood and my family. I pulled in at about 9:46pm local time. Pulled up to the garage and gave a rev followed by a quick tap of the horn to let my kids know the Amtrak had arrived. It must have worked because the garage door opened and I was greeted by smiling kids and a confused wife. I had made it. 1,000 miles in two days, through prairie and mountains and high desert. Home safe with little more than a sore shoulder to show for it. The old Honda did her part and God kept the roads clear for me so I could get home to my little ones. It was nice to be back on a bike again. Nice to have an adventure with some stories to tell. And it was nice to be home in once piece to enjoy Easter morning with my kids the next day, which we did. I shot a quick text to Tyler to let him know that I’d made it all the way home and show off a pic of the bike next to my Mustang. “Awesome, enjoy it!” he replied. I intend to. Ride safe, Justin
    14 points
  3. Just posting about a few things done on the '99, I'm coming up on 20-years of ownership this week (9/14) and just short of 118K miles. Finished up adding the Ducati 1098 rear wheel conversion with the Australian Extreme Creations kit. And more Sebspeed Customs parts, custom cut RC51 triples with an offset closer to the original VFR specs, with a Rizoma bar. VFRD Wild headers mated to the completely refurbished Wolf exhaust from sfdownhill, done late last year. And just had the Ohlins serviced a few weeks ago. More to come eventually, on the lookout for some forged wheels. Thanks to Sebspeed for the work to create the triples, awesome design.
    13 points
  4. Back in January, when it dawned on me there would be no more VFR's made , I bought one . A good deal was done and I did go for many accessories. I always wanted a red one, so Victory red it was. I went for the Akrapovic exhaust, hugger, quick shifter , panniers and a Powerbronze double bubble screen. Having covered 165 miles so far since last Friday. Its still between 3-6C here and it feels it . Having 2 5 th Gen VFR's , its all fairly familiar. Everything fell to hand and the seating position is a little bit sportier. Other than the horn and the indicators being swapped round everything else is exactly where you would find it. It rides very nicely but the suspension is hard. I have softened it down a notch at the back , seems to have helped and I will do the rebound later on as its still too hard and I am no lightweight at around 105 kg. There are 2 things which I havent quite got to grips with yet. The back brake is one. It feels very ineffective atm and the pedal feels long. Maybe the rear brake needs a little running in or perhaps It needs bleeding . I will get it seen to at the first service at 600 miles. The other thing that does bother me is the quick shifter. I'm kind of thinking its a bit pointless. Certainly the standard gear change and clutch are buttery smooth in operation and the gear change is very different with the quick shifter. Whilst I have got used to its size I still say to myself I will take that off when I get home after every ride . The quick shifter pedal is most definitely shorter than the standard shifter, not in length but width , as in the part that goes over your foot when you change up. I don't have big clumpy boots but still find myself pushing my foot to the right to make sure I hook up with the lever. I fail to see why they made it shorter. Otherwise the VFR is exactly as expected. The quality is great, the ride and handling are good and I look forward to getting the V-TEC singing at indecent revs once its run in. You all know what a VFR looks like, but just in case you have forgotten.
    13 points
  5. 13 points
  6. I sent him a PM with a question about a rear rim swap he did a while back on his 86 VFR. We traded a few PM's, then he sent me a fairly detailed write up on how to do it. Tonight, I recieved a full picture tutorial with all the actual parts showing how to do it. To say he went over and above would be an understatment, of an understatement. He saved me time, wasted effort, frustration and embarassment. Whats that worth? Well, certainly a public Thank You. Thanks mate.
    12 points
  7. While re-reading all 43 pages of this to answer my above questions I noted the key points to summarize for those looking to weed info out of the banter. I was looking for 5th Gen info so I might have missed something, but maybe this will save someone hours of sifting; Page 1 -General Design Specs Page 5 -Air Filters Page 6 -Prototype Install Page 7 -Fitment and Preliminary Dyno Page 8 -Install with Centerstand instructions Page 11 -Gasket details Page 13 -O2 bungs Page 13 -8th Gen Pics Page 14 -6th Gen Dyno Page 15 -First batch packaging info, weights and dimensions Page 16 - 8th Gen Dyno Page 26 -Power Commander Map Dynos Gen 5, 6 & 8
    12 points
  8. Dymag made for me a Cbr600F4I forged front wheel, to complete the project.
    12 points
  9. A little over 2 years ago I bought a 1990 with 45,000 kilometers/28,000 miles on the clock from a member here from Canada. I went on my merry way off to sea for work thinking I'll pick it up when I get back. Well that didn't work out as the border was closed by the time I did return. Glenn, the owner, was kind enough to store it for me, put a charger on it and periodically start it up for the better part of 2 years as I waited for the Border to reopen. When it did re open my first try was not successful. In order to enter I needed my passport, proof of vaccination, proof of negative Covid test within 72 hours and had to fill out a Arrive Canada online form only after I had proof of a negative test. My test came in to late to meet this standard so I shelled out $175 for a quicker one at a clinic in Bangor. Once at the border, it was the usual drill, passport, proof of vaccination, proof of negative test and proof of Arrive Canada form filled out. Then it was.... Reason of visit "to pick up a motorcycle" What type? "Honda" Model? "1990 VFR750" The Border agent suddenly relaxed a bit, and leaned out the window, " I have a 2002, and love it" Well since there was no one behind me we chatted for about 15 minutes about VFR's. It had been raining since I left, but it really started to come down now, The remnants of Hurricane Ida were tracking right over New Brunswick. I stopped for a bit just short of St John as the trusty CRV's AWD light had been coming on about every 5-10 seconds and the vehicle was going light. With standing water on the highway like I had not seen in a long time I knew it was hydroplaning, also the 4 cars over turned and 2 in the woods kinda confirmed things were not well. So I pulled off the road and notified Glenn I may not make it. After a quick perusal of Hotel options I carried on, slowly, like 30 mph in a 62mph zone. I ended up stopping 4 more times as I could not see, and the Honda was starting to go at less than desirable angles. I made it finally, 12.5 hours for what is normally a 9 hour trip to Nova Scotia. Glenn and his wife kindly put me up as I was shattered and tired. We had dinner the Glenn and I loaded the bike on the trailer. I was up at 5 am and on the road at 6. Made it to Calais around 12, and declared the bike for import and was kindly directed to the side. A few minutes later a young woman in Border Patrol gear came over and asked a few questions and I handed her my paperwork. Half hour later she came back to apologize as no one on station, nor any one they called had done a motorcycle importation. I laughed and said they must do a lot of snowmobiles though! She smiled and said "Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring, we see a Lot of Snow Machines......... A few minutes after the head of Customs came out for a quick chat and asked me about the bike and could I get out of the car and have a look with him. Nice guy I showed him the head stem Vin and he said he could nor believe this was a 31 year old bike. We talked bikes for a bit then I got back in the car. A few minutes after the woman Border Patrol officer came out with a bunch of papers for me to sign and noted That I was on the hook for $5.08 in duty, which her boss laughed off and I was on my way. I cannot convey how professional, attentive, courteous and friendly the whole process was. Thank You Calais Maine Border Patrol. The bike.
    11 points
  10. A few months ago, I found this new, old-stock 2014 VFR at a nearby Honda dealer. It was still in the shipping crate and offered at a very hefty discount from the original MSRP, so I brought it home. Since I'm a tall guy, I installed risers and lowered pegs. I also added an Arrow exhaust and Power Commander V. I have ordered a new shock/spring and will have the forks rebuilt later this summer to accommodate my weight. I recently did a 1k mile trip with it and the suspension was my only real complaint. It's a great daily bike and fits nicely between my track bikes and dual-sports. I'm pretty happy with it, especially considering the price. I know there are quite a few of these bikes languishing around dealer warehouses in the US, so there are bargains to be had if you can find one.
    11 points
  11. Well, after a long search for an 8th gen VFR in white I finally have one. Its pretty well in mint condition. 19,000kms, 2014 VFR Newish Michelin Road 5s Full toolkit and manuals and it came with Honda OEM luggage which I probably will not use. ( If someone is looking for white Honda side luggage send me a PM) Gave a full detail and cleaned the chain and lube yesterday Oil / filter changed and brake fluid flush done at dealer. She's in tip top shape. Didn't expect the bike to feel much different than my 6th gen RWB but it does. More responsive and flickable. Feels more compact due to radiators at front now. I want to be more aggressive with it in the twisties due to lack of width compared to 6th gen LOL. Brakes are superior and low end grunt is noticeable. Basically I luv it. The fact that I do not have to worry about a stator or RR is a big deal to me. To me the bike sounds different and in a better way than my 6th. I have the stock pipe too. Styling wise, while it won't replace my beloved RWB it is more modern looking and in the pearl white what can I say. Its good to back in the pilots seat. Ride safe everyone. Enjoy the pics.
    10 points
  12. Can’t wait to finally get this project completed thank you lance and Darryl IMG_2411.MOV
    10 points
  13. I'm just going to drop this picture and continue on my way...
    10 points
  14. Hi to everyone I always wanted to own a vfr800 6gen i leave in Cyprus and there are only few left on the island and is difficult to choose and buy.Any way 6 months ago i buy my honda vfr 800 that was a UK import.The rust on metal frame and and the bad cleaning of UK salt was enough to start crying for what i was looking especially when was without fairing. So after a lot of work by me i finally make it like new with a replica desing of MotoGP repsol winter test. For all of you that you want to comment good or bad your are welcome to do.Any suggestions are welcome too. Thanks for your time in advance.
    10 points
  15. OK, I'm cheating a little, but the engine cases are stamped HRC, and it's a V engine:
    10 points
  16. Found this buckle in the rim a few weeks ago. Not sure whether it was from a cattle grid in far west Queensland or one of my local goat tracks. Didn’t ever lose pressure, but I couldn’t sleep at night. Repairing it mucked up the finish so I had the rims painted black.
    10 points
  17. Hello fellow Vifferini! I recently picked up another 2001 VFR800 after a 15 year hiatus from riding. I posted a trip report in the ride reports section documenting the 1,000 mile journey to bring it home. With the bike now in my garage it's time to get it dialed in and "make her mine" so to speak. The goal is to loosely recreate the memory of my first 2001 that I bought new back in the day. Here is my first '01 the day I brought it home from the dealer. I was still living at home at the time so I told my mom it was her mother's day present. ; ) And after a few mods: Genmar risers, Sargent seat, Staintune Highmount, K&N air filter, rear fender delete, Vista cruise throttle lock and tank bra. Sold after 5 years and 26,000 (s)miles. Here is my new bike. It has 21k miles. Current mods are Vance & Hines pipe, 16T front sprocket, speed healer module, headlight modulator, Stebel Nautilus dual tone horn, Heli bars, VFRness harness, Cortech tank bag with mount, ZG double bubble windscreen. It runs great but needs some maintenance and a good clean up and polish. Things I like: Heli bars! Love these!! Way better than the Genmar risers I had before. Headlight modulator. If it helps to be seen why not? VFRness harness. We're all familiar with the R/R issues on these bikes so this is a great upgrade. Things to change: pipe, seat, probably get a new chain and OEM sized sprockets and the tank bag has gotta go. It's useful but I don't like the mounting ring sticking up from the fuel filler. Also needs oil and filter change and a new air filter, and I need to dial in the wind buffeting better. The first thing I ordered was a new Sargent seat. Prices have gone up on these but I am glad they are still available. I was able to negotiate 10% off for being a repeat customer (even 20 years later!) and they throw in a Sargent hat with the order as standard practice. This is such a nice upgrade over stock. By comparison, the stock seat is like a piece of plywood covered in vinyl and the Sargent is like having Richard Simmons personally hugging your bum while you ride. It’s quite wonderful really, for short or long rides. Nice for the wife/pillion too. Once I installed the seat I also took a chance to give the bike it’s first wash since being home. Next up was the pipe. The V&H sounds better than stock but the Staintune is where it’s at for me. The Staintune company nearly went out of business but has recently joined up with another company in Australia to continue making products. I spoke with the parent company (torqit.com.au) last week and was told it will be a few months before they are ramped up and start turning out stock. I had posted on the forum that I was looking for one and another forum member reached out to me. His pipe had a couple minor dings and needs a good polish but we settled on a price and he shipped it out. My plan is to polish it up and see if I can pull the dings somehow but for now it’s on and it sounds even better than I remembered. 😊 And when I’m riding I can’t see the imperfections, I just hear the glorious V4 noise that this bike makes. When it comes to go fast bits, the Aussies don’t mess around. Super happy with it. Wind buffeting was an issue on my ride home from Kansas. I’m just 5’8” tall and the combination of Heli bars and the DB windscreen puts turbulent air right at my helmet. Even with ear plugs it’s really noisy. I thought I’d try a cheap air deflector from Amazon as they are adjustable. I first angled it up hoping to push the wind up and over my helmet but it created a lot of turbulence. I moved it around a bit and found that setting it up like a biplane wing seems to smooth the airflow much better. So the air still hits my helmet but it seems to be much cleaner and noise is reduced by some margin. Combined with better ear plugs I don’t have nearly the same amount of buffeting noise as before. I also installed a new Vista Cruise like I had back in the day. Great to have on long rides between twisties. Now we move on to the air filter where I found a bit of a surprise. The filter on the bike is definitely OEM, and who knows, could be the original, or at least 10 years old. Not sure how this thing breathed all the way home from Kansas but the filter did it’s job. The throttle body trumpets were all clean and looked good. I ordered a new K&N, removed the old filter and airbox O-rings and installed the new. Also took a minute to clean up the airbox lid. I removed the snorkel just to try it out as I remember that being a thing way back when. Went for one ride and put it back in. It just makes a little more intake noise and I’d rather hear more exhaust than intake. With those items tackled it was time for new oil and filter. Honda GN4 and an OEM filter ought to do the trick. Took some time to clean up around the filter a bit. Also noticed the coolant level was low so I topped that off. **Question** Does anyone know at what temp the radiator fan is supposed to kick on? I noticed earlier in the day that the bike got up to 206* F while idling in the driveway and it didn’t seem like the fan had kicked on yet. I need to make sure that is working properly. After the air filter install and the oil change I went for a ride last night and the bike runs great. I’m sure it was happy to be breathing better and have fresh oil. Next steps: 1. Eliminate the tank bag mount for which I have ordered new bolts for the fuel filler. 2. Do a full polish on the paint to see if I can give it some new life. 3. Clean and adjust the chain or just buy new to start fresh there. 4. Get some proper franken bolts 5. Touch up a few nicks on the wheels where the paint is missing 6. Possibly new brake pads front and rear 7. Go on some more epic rides! Anyway, it’s great to be back on a bike and certainly something as cool as a 5th gen VFR. I am loving it big time. I live between a mountain and a lake so we have some decent roads to cruise on. More to come! Cheers and ride safe, Justin
    9 points
  18. It’s a deluxe. 2 miles on the ticker, and a new bike warranty. They are still looking for the cowl, but I have mine from my old bike, just in case. The dealer thinks it’s the last new one in the US. I don’t know how to confirm that.
    9 points
  19. The money shots (I hope)...... Aparently prospective buyers in the Netherlands want OEM, so I give 'm OEM (as much as I can) Pity I sold the OEM rearsets and clutch master years ago). Underneath her clothes are a PowerCommanderV, K-Tech SSK, MOSFET RR, K&N airfilter, new Yuasa. Comes with pillion seat PM me if interested.
    9 points
  20. I banned about 5 spammers, and delt with a bad thread, issued a temporary ban for inappropriate behaviour. For the most part this place polices itself but once in a while I have to step in and let people go, or at least put them in vfrd jail. Hate that, I hate that, I hate having to do that sort of thing. In any case i have not been able to get the server mail function to work, I am at my wits end. I am sure its probably some syntax thing in the configuration but it just wont sent out mail for notifications, and I have not been getting notified when bad things happen here. Working on it.
    9 points
  21. Drove up and met Styran this morning and helped him out. Very nice young man with great curiosity, and intuition for mechanical things. Great to see that, as it has become rare these days. Turns out he had also snapped an extractor off in the bolt, trying to get it out, and those things are hardened. We were able to eventually get through that with some diamond dremel bits, and some patience. Then I was able to drill the remaining tip of the bolt and get it out with an extractor. Finally I was able to remove the old heli-coil. We cleaned, re-tapped, and cleaned the hole again. I had him order a longer heli-coil from McMaster Carr, so he will get full engagement. So far so good, and it looks like the repair should be solid.
    9 points
  22. Phillip Island circuit March 2008. My RWB on a California Superbike course, a great full on day at the Island.
    9 points
  23. I have already received flak from quite a few people, some in private messages. Your disapproval is just that, and is absolutely not the way I see this project. I want to create something that FOR ME is faster, lighter, looks less beat-up, handles better, and is more fun without worrying about brittle plastics, and is cheap. I love seeing all the nice bikes, and cool projects on this site. I have gained plenty of knowledge from this community and supported it financially over the years. In the muscle car, and Porsche community it used to be the same. But now resto-mod cars built to better the specifications of the higher end factory models, and are fetching big bucks ( like the perfect stock original cars ). Those builds almost always start with a beater 2 barrel low end automatic junker, and can end up being a top-notch ride. I'm not modifying an RC30 that's worth 50 grand, I bought it because it was cheaper than the 80cc scooter I wanted. Most parts coming off will be free to whoever wants them if they pay shipping.
    9 points
  24. May 2017 at Thunderhill Raceway Park, Willows, CA. Second time back on track after a pretty bad wreck in 2015. Don't mind the watermark, Keigwins (now Carter's) was giving us watermarked JPGs with the logos to share on social media as part of their marketing that year.
    9 points
  25. After several months of nothing but unpacking, cleaning and home-improvements, I finally made it out for ride! Went up past Canyon Lake to Tortilla Flat this last Sunday!
    8 points
  26. The old girl still got it. After these pics, at about 1 am, I was bombing through the long tunnel under the legislature and ripped it to redline in 1st and second gears. the tunnel was empty except for ONE car at the stoplight at the exit of the tunnel. Turned out to be a COP. He flipped the lights on and off as a warning, but didn’t do anything. He also had his window open, so he MOST certainly heard my exhaust. LOL I rode home very slowly after that and called it an evening.
    8 points
  27. Today I put precisely 77.9 miles on the RC51 on roads in my back yard, fantastic roads actually, but unfortunately during the summer occupied by vehicles both 10 times larger, and 10 times slower, than my bike. This time of year it is a know hazard, tourist season, but this afternoon I actually had above-average miles of perfectly paved winding coast road open to me and the RC. To be fair, our locals are very nice about pulling over into the frequent turnouts, as the signs tell them to. Tourists not so much (can you say Mustang convertible?) As always, the rule-of-thumb here is that the more cows you see, the more bugs you have to remove from your face shield. Rolling through Tomales I made a spur-of-the-moment left turn towards Dillon Beach, then cut through back roads towards Valley Ford. Looped back south through Nick's Cove, Marshall (I don't like oysters), with hardly a rolling RV roadblock to slow me down. What a great road! By the time I got to Point Reyes Station the parade had slowed to a crawl, but I turned east at Olema to the back roads that I know, bumpy but thinly traveled. I will never sell this bike, what a hoot. 😎
    8 points
  28. Hi All. Whilst stumbling through some old photos I found a sentimental favourite. The first photo of my first VFR after just getting her home 16 years ago, April 2005. Shame about the ugly bloke behind the bike, kind of destroys a nice bike photo. Did 56,000k's, only issue was the Crispy Critter Stator at 49,000k's otherwise a great bike. Sold it in 2008 after falling in love with the limited edition 2007 RWB. A registration check tells me this bike is still roaming the streets somewhere. Sure would love to see it again. Cheers.
    8 points
  29. I was glad I went, but I do wish there were more European manufacturers other than KTM--and Honda of course. No Ducati, BMW, Aprilia, Triumph. I was hoping to look at helmets too but only HJC was there. If you've been to these shows before (I haven't), or a major race you've probably seen more vendors. But I guess pulling it off at all this year was an accomplishment. However--the focus was demos, and the roads of southern Sonoma County were crawling with guys (and lots of women!) on demo bikes from all the brands present: So (if Buells don't count) my Livewire ride yesterday was the first time I have ever operated an HD! It was smoother, narrower and lighter (feeling) than it looks. I had ridden a Zero a few years ago so I knew what to expect performance-wise: strong, linear power at all times, not much character but you never get caught in the wrong gear. Yes, I kept trying to downshift coming to a stop. Good fit and finish. Of course the usual problems will prevent me from purchasing: charge time, range, charing station availability, price, can't borrow electrons when you run out, etc. The higher-end electric bicycles have a CVT-type variable transmission in the rear hub, kinda cool. For only the price of a good used 5th gen you too can own this bicycle: The Pan America: incredibly ugly IMHO, retaining the worst styling elements of HD cruisers while looking like a lump. Great, strong engine once I switched to sport mode, comfy seat and riding position. Really weird kickstand design that will probably result in a lot of tipovers. Continuing with HD, the batwing fairing has been taken to new literal extremes. Yes, in the background that's the other RC-51 besides mine at this event, a 2003 also. Grum was here but I must have missed him: Just like today's featured photo, almost! A DCT: Heading home on the best bike at this show, of course!
    8 points
  30. People who don't understand the importance of fuel efficiency and range have never ridden so far out there that if they ran out of gas they would die trying to walk back to civilization.
    8 points
  31. Well it was a long search but I finally bought a stock 2014 VFR 800f Deluxe unmolested. To me initial responses are good. It feels way more spunkier in the lower rev range than my 6th Gen RWB. Bike has 19,000kms Brand new Michelin Road 5s I have attached a pic and will report back with my impressions as I get more seat time. It feels good to be back in the pilots seat. Thanks
    8 points
  32. The minimum is still 15. There was a misunderstanding with the builder but ultimately the builder's pipe supplier is the culprit here. That being said, sfdownhill and I are taking a little break from this for the moment. Never say never but probably won't be for a while, if we do go again. This last run seemed to take forever just to get in the orders and then to get them completed seemed prolonged as well. I'm glad to be part of it and can't thank everyone enough for being patient and even purchasing them. Also like to add a big thanks to CornerCarver, his loaning us his 2 Bros headers helped this all get off the ground. Cheers
    8 points
  33. 5 th gen VFR's are my thing really. I buy them then rescue them but I always try and start with a bike that has good provenance / a verifiable history and certainly all its papers/books/service invoices as well as owners handbook and original service book etc etc . I don't know if its me, but the amount of bikes I come across that only have a log book ( the ownership papers for my American friends on here ) and nothing else. So many people seem to lose their other documents . I just don't get it. Personally , I won't buy a bike without supporting paperwork unless it is cheap. Im not scared of the many jobs that need doing , and whilst I look, inspect and renew parts as needed, if it is perfectly serviceable then the part gets cleaned and put back . In the case of this VFR , it was a 7 hour round trip. Half a dozen owners and just 15,300 miles on the clock with lots of history /paperwork and its not been got at . Where needed things are replaced or cleaned and put back . The original exhaust was in such good condition that I left it alone. The rear shock absorber although with a few marks is working remarkably well. A pictorial for you of the work in progress. This is how it came to me and it is presented to you after a wash. First job was to strip it of all its bodywork and give it a really good clean . There was 2 years of chain wax/grease all over the back of the bike and the front sprocket cover was oozing the stuff. All cleaned up . Chain guide removed. Old rusty bolts replaced with stainless steel items. Swing arm cleaned along with the entire back end. I used a lot of brake cleaner & degreaser. Back end looking a lot better, and the chain adjuster is nice and free. The next job was to clean the engine, replace the coolant, oil and filter , fix a coolant leak , couple of new coolant hoses and clips and replace the oil pipes with some better stainless steel items that are made for us over here at less than half the price of the Honda part. I also replaced the fan housing, as these rust and I had a freshly powder coated one so on it went. New oil line and clean engine cases. Cleaned oil cooler and new lines. New oil line, oil filter and clean engine casing. That exhaust is in such good condition. Radiator off and the fan housing has been replaced by a freshly powder coated one. It looks so much better and will be much more durable. Fan and rad back in place and being tested for leaks and making sure the fan kicks in at the right temperature. Next job was to change the air filter for a K & N item . All reassembled and everything here was inspected and cleaned . The VFR had heated grips that didn't work. They had to go and new grips were fitted. Then it was time to tackle the front end. Fork seals, stanchions were cleaned up. Lowers were striped, cleaned and repainted. I have seen much worse. After a repaint, waiting for the legs to dry . The front brakes were fully serviced. Cleaned and any internals where needed were replaced. I always replace the pad pins with titanium items ad Ti doesn't rust and use Ti caps. New brake pads from Mr Honda fitted all round and all the brake fluid was also replaced. The wheel was replaced with a white item , with new bearings, Ti disk bolts and Ti pinch bolts . Disks were in excellent condition and were cleaned up . New Pirelli tyres were also fitted . A different view in daylight so you can see the result. I think its come out very well . And not forgetting to clean up here either. Yes thats a dirty mark, not a flaw in the fork paint. Thats the front end done. Now took the back of the bike off. Everything was checked , cleaned and every connector removed and refitted to make sure it all connects as it should, especially the RR connections. New clips and bolts for the rear brake lines too . Its all good this side. And this side . And also in here. Then all the bodywork was put back and the whole lot was mopped and polished. Its easier to to on the work table. And there you have it. One 20 year old VFR , refreshed and ready to do another 20 years. There are lots of things I have pictures off that I have not posted. I didn't want to bore you . Overall Im very pleased how this one turned out. Thats the third one I have done. Those Ti bolts look so good. Out with its older brother today as the sun was out . Proof that you can have more than 1 VFR and get away with it. As they are both blue my wife thinks I only have 1 bike and its the same one she sees. At least thats what I tell her . Now looking for my next project VFR.
    8 points
  34. Here’s my tire usage for the year. My year to date mileage is approaching 28000 . Set1 Installed Feb 14; Metzeler Roadtecs (Tires cost $324.73) mounted at 44200 Mi Notes: High Flow Oil Filter installed during service for tires. This filter developed a gradual leak that eventually coated part of the rear tire. Metzelers had accumulated approximately 4200 mi when this occurred. No more non-OEM oil filters for me ! Set 2 Installed Mar 14; Pirelli STs (Tires cost $214.49) mounted at 48403 Mi. Notes: Pirelli STs replaced oil coated Metzelers. Instantly noticed more lively steering feel and tip in.Enjoyed this set thoroughly. Belts showing on Rear tire just before 54444 Mi. Pirelli STs accumulated 6041 Mi. Set 3 Installed June 2; Metzeler Z6s (Tires cost $217) mounted at 54444 Mi. Notes: Metzelers steered heavier than the Pirellis. Stable smooth riding. Metzeler Z6s accumulated approximately 5038 miles before belts began to show on the rear. Set4 Installed Jul 2; Metzeler Roadtecs (Tires cost $324.33) mounted at 59482 Mi Notes: Roadtecs provide a great balance of Feel, Grip, and Comfort at a premium price. These tires had accumulated approximately 6665 mi when the rear developed an unrepairable puncture. They were pretty close to being worn out. Set5 Installed Oct 22; Pirelli STs (Tires cost $215) mounted at 66147 Mi. Notes: Pirellis impress with excellent feel and ride for a great price. Currently have accumulated about 4500 mi on this set with (hopefully) 1500 more miles to go. Set1 Installed ?? 2021; Pirelli STs (Tires cost $215) Notes: Already purchased another set of the Pirelli STs for next year. Great performance at a bargain basement price. But.... I still want a high quality tire that can go over 8000 mi if I have the chance to ride west in 2021. My personal record on one set of tires would be the Bridgestone T30s I rode on the big round trip excursion from NC to Cali and back in 2018...8614 Mi on that set before replacing them. They were squared off and felt really dull by then. Never had one tire issue during the trip though. In fairness, those Bridgestones were installed before suspension upgrades were done. I ride more aggressively now ( after the Jamie Daugherty suspension upgrades ) so that may also affect tire wear. Perhaps trying another set of Bridgestones would be warranted. To be continued....
    8 points
  35. OK all, if you had ordered your headers on this last run we did, you'll be glad to know that all but a few (The International orders) have left the building. FedEx typically does a 3-5 day for ground shipments and they should be going on the trucks on Monday. So be on the lookout for your headers. The box is 36x16x16 and weighs about 16 lbs. Thanks to everyone who has bought from us and thank you even more for being so patient, this last run seemed like it took so much longer to get going and done, so thanks again for hanging in there with us. Cheers, D
    8 points
  36. I rode a 1280 KTM in Austin a few years back at the demo ride KTM tent. I really loved the awesome motor and supple suspension. It was way way way out of my price range. So I forgot all about it. Reverse course a couple of weeks ago I was bored at work on my break, scrolling thru cycle trader on my phone, just a bunch of boring metric cruisers and squid owned bikes. I decided to look at my local dealership online inventory. Oh snap they had a 990 Super Duke with 10k miles on it, and 5300 dollars. Just so happens I had the cash, fast forward. Turns out a squid owned it previously. Removed the mirrors, sprocket cover, hugger. Dropped it. But in decent shape. Price was right, made the dealer fix some stuff. But now I got 3 bikes in my tiny garage.
    8 points
  37. I obviously like VFR’s , which is why I am here , and I am fortunate enough to have more than 1 . For me part of being a VFR afficionado means I like to ride my VFR , talk / read / watch things about motorcycles and VFR’s in particular , although I confess I have other non VFR motorcycles and have owned many different bikes over the years , but always gravitate back . I personally think its sad that the VFR line is finished . VFR’s are discontinued and it is the end of an era. Allegedly its Euro 5 that’s finally killed it off although as discussed on here and other forums its more the fashion for adventure bikes that’s to blame. Honda is not going to spend money improving a bike that’s not going to sell in big numbers . Shame. Everyone seems to want one of those adventure bikes and I don’t want to start a war of words, I don’t get it . Im not crossing the Kalahari and even if I did I wouldn’t be doing it on one of those overcomplicated adventure bikes. It would be something strong, reliable and easy to fix. Honda Xl 500/600 perhaps, or a Yamaha XT660 . Certainly not a Triumph 1200 or a GS 1200/1250 , they are just not for me. I don’t know what adventures all the owners of these bikes are having , but it seems to me the most they go off road is up a kerb or a grass verge . They are huge, overweight, overpriced, ugly, full of stuff you don’t need/don’t want/can’t fix and not as reliable as they make you believe. You really going to take your £15-£20 K bike off road and scratch or drop it, because trust me you will ? Of course not. It’s a fashion statement mostly and yes that's just my opinion . If you changed their name from adventure bike to upright touring bike id probably be more amenable about them . Anyway, lets move on . I hope this doesn’t come across as an angry post because its not meant to be angry . I’m not angry . In fact I am smirking because what I have been reading over the last 2-3 months has proved to me we are right , and it is the same thing over and over again and I am going to suggest its something every VFR 800 owner already knows. The motorcycle press , papers, magazines , online, forums are all buzzing with excitement over the 2020 Aprilia 660 . Every manufacturer has killed off their 600 capacity bikes and they were good and honed over years , but they don't sell anymore . However fast forward a bit of time, Aprilia turns up with their 2020 660 and If you read what's been written about it , road tests , everyone is wax lyrical about it. They are all saying without exception what a great bike it is and how it’s the new motorcycling messiah. Its not too big and intimidating, it has the right amount of power all of which is useable unlike a 200 bhp bike , it handles well , it looks good, its comfortable , has the right equipment and it is the right price. They also say a lot more about it spec wise and you can read all the details instead of have me regurgitate them to you . Just pick up MCN or any bike magazine. So in the interest to satisfy what I already knew , and what my own " butt dyno " was telling me , so no one could accuse me of wearing my rose tinted spectacles I thought I would do it in black and white . I would like to share with you what I found out . For the record I have NOT ridden an Aprilia 660 . HONDA VFR 800 APRILIA 660 800 ( 782 cc) 660 (659 cc ) V4 VTEC PARALLEL TWIN 105.9 BHP 99 BHP 55.9 LB-FT 49.4 LB-FT 240 KG ( WET ) 190 KG ( WET ) & Fuel load adjusted. TOP SPEED 146 MPH TOP SPEED 145 MPH 0-60 MPH 3 SEC 0-60 MPH NOT AVAILABLE MPG 49.6 ( Fuelly.com) MPG 48 ( Official specs ) 119.5 CO2 g/km 116 CO2 g/km FUEL CAP 21.5 L FUEL CAP 15 L PRICE £9,999 PRICE £10,150 The official Honda list price is £9,999 , but I have just bought a brand new one for £8,999.00 and I see others advertised at this price. These bikes have similar specs . I fail to see how one is the new saviour and the other one is a relic of the past that is trading on a 20 year old reputation and people say the VFR era peaked with the 98-01 VFR 800 . To me the VFR is so much the better bike. They say the last incarnation had few changes from the one before. To those I would say that clearly Honda got it so right to start off with that there was little that needed changing . Why is the VFR better ? It’s a V4 Vtec for a start. An engine configuration everyone is chasing which just goes to show how right Honda were 30 years ago. Its silky smooth . It doesn’t vibrate like the Aprilia 660 despite its counterbalancing attempts . The VFR won’t make your hands numb due to those vibrations. The VFR costs less , has more power, more torque , bigger tank, longer range , is better made , has vtec, heated grips , 12 v port adjustable seat height and will be more reliable . The Honda support network is better . They both have radial brakes and adjustable suspension, although the VFR has conventional forks to the Aprilia has upside down forks. The VFR does weigh more but the performance specs are the same .They both have the same top speed near enough and the VFR does 0-60 in 3 secs. I cannot find any 0-60 figures for the Aprilia but will guess its in the same region . A Panigale V2 does 0-60 in 2.9 secs so you can’t accuse the VFR of being slow . Aprilia has a tft dash and a few electronic rider modes and the VFR has old style instruments and a rudimentary traction control . The Honda comes in 2 sober colours whilst the Aprilia comes in a choice of 3 shell suits . What this comparison has done is proved to me how fashion dictates sales/perception but it has also confirmed to me what an absolute peach and a bargain of a bike the VFR 800 is and if I hadn’t just bought one I should run out and buy however many are left , and hoard them because when fashion changes again and it will people will wake up and will look at those of us who have a VFR with envy . How many times have you heard this before from a dealer. Yes mate, we did sell them . We ended up discounting them to get rid of them . To be honest with you for some reason we couldn’t give them away at the time . Now I get half a dozen calls every week with people wanting one. I will end with this. Honda VFR 800 , honed over decades unsurpassed quality and if you want a lesson in sport touring deportment the VFR 800 is it. As Bike magazine said, in a class of 1 . The King is dead, Long live the king.
    8 points
  38. awesome on the track, no so much on the street.......
    8 points
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