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Honda's New ST - NT1100


Skids
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Rode 95 miles today mostly at around 40-60 mph on very twisty and narrow roads which were also quite bumpy. Gets you very good at trail braking and thinking a long way ahead to plan your moves; don't be too sorry for us. Last 20 miles were at around 80-115 mph (oops) avoiding various ' cages' as you folks like to call them and exploring the full range of bank angle on traffic circles. Overall 57 mpg. The 8G is a truly remarkable machine and excellent on UK roads. Great fun. Now hiding in the garage in case anyone noticed.

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3 minutes ago, Presson said:

Rode 95 miles today mostly at around 40-60 mph on very twisty and narrow roads which were also quite bumpy. Gets you very good at trail braking and thinking a long way ahead to plan your moves; don't be too sorry for us. Last 20 miles were at around 80-115 mph (oops) avoiding various ' cages' as you folks like to call them and exploring the full range of bank angle on traffic circles. Overall 57 mpg. The 8G is a truly remarkable machine and excellent on UK roads. Great fun. Now hiding in the garage in case anyone noticed.

What roads were you able to go 80-115mph on? I thought you guys had lots of speed cameras? 

I totally agree that the 8G is remarkable... it is easily my Dream bike....Give me $30k.... and I'd buy another one and pocket the cash 😉 

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Oh look... 650ib youtube channel ....someone crashed 200+hp Ducati......only a matter of time driving the way they do....ride and use your 150+ hp on country roads and expressways....YOU WILL scratch your bike. 😉 

Why I LOVE watching 650ib's videos... I would classify them as being "dumb as a shovel"....especially when they think that someone won't change lanes when you're flying up on cars going 180mph

I've ALWAYS said... the best part about riding a motorcycle is when you pull back in your driveway SAFE!!!!

 

 

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42 minutes ago, flya750 said:

....someone crashed 200+hp Ducati......only a matter of time driving the way they do....ride and use your 150+ hp on country roads and expressways

Power used irresponsibly is always a problem. Just because its there doesn't mean it needs to be used. In an old job I was generally using 60-80% rpm to go forward. Up to 115% was available but the speed and fuel  penalties were potentially severe so one got used to being cautious and keeping to plan. Idiot behaviour on the road also has potential penalties but personally I'd still like the capacity for that fast overtake or acceleration away from hazards. It's a question of self control and responsibility. In short, I don't agree that there is a definitive upper HP limit for road riding but I do agree that not everyone gets that.

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19 hours ago, Captain 80s said:

 

So much this.  No VTEC.  Just a true gear driven cam liter 90 V4 with some bags.   Plus all the the modern era gives us.

 

But...  I love my 98 ST1100 (NON ABS/DCBS/TCS) so much because it's just a basic fucking great Honda.  But it's heavy.  Luckily Honda was so good during this period that it loses a lot of weight once rolling.  Doesn't help in parking lots with the wife and luggage tho.

 

Plus...  full face helmets in each (nicely) integrated saddle bag.

 

 

I totally forgot about the ST!!  That would be about perfect.

Just need to move a few things around in the garage.. get the 500 all zipped up.. convince the wife I'm getting another bike 🤣🤣

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4 hours ago, jstehman said:

Sounds like he's just expanding on what can be found in the stats on the bike.  Has he ridden it?  

I believe he states in the video that he has not ridden one yet, but looks forward to review riding one in the near future.

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In 2012, Yamaha started making a heavy,  parallel twin, 108hp/84ft lbs bike with primitive electronics that can be disabled .

I recently sold it after a year of ownership and I miss it every day. 

 

And don't get fooled by 108hp/84ft lbs.  You'll hit and float at triple digits with easy and after an ECU reflash by https://2wheeldynoworks.com/, it'll try to rip your arms off.  For a few months, I ran it with a borrowed Yoshimura pipe.  A cross-lane parallel twin, with a pipe "bumbs".  I hear the tune changes with an Arrow header.

 

It handled every potholed, washed out, hairpin, sweeper I could find in Marin/Sonoma and in my backyard Berkeley/Oakland Hills with aplomb and would only tell me to slow down when an ultra tight left turn kissed the drive shaft.  The solution was a tuned suspension but I knew my time with it was short. 

 

'12 and '13 were recalled for "a gap may develop in the protective sealant where the lead wires of the accelerator position sensor (APS) and throttle position sensor (TPS) connect to the electronic control unit (ECU). Though my Tenere was "fixed" I had to reperform the wiring as the recall tech installed it incorrectly.   

 

'14 to present updated to electronic suspension and other items I don't care to delve into.

 

Though it's much lighter than the Super Tenere, I just don't see myself buying the NT.  I'd rather get another Super Tenere for anywhere between $5-7k and send the ECU for a reflash and sort out the suspension.

 

 

20210607_101641.thumb.jpg.75128429a5beec5c3e3bc68d0b88e1e9.jpg

 

Though if they make this CBX4...

CB4X_EICMA_03.thumb.jpg.440f3a2b42e8422613aa19c641b95b8b.jpg

 

 

 

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On 11/5/2021 at 3:08 AM, Tirso said:

In 2012, Yamaha started making a heavy,  parallel twin, 108hp/84ft lbs bike with primitive electronics that can be disabled .

I recently sold it after a year of ownership and I miss it every day. 

 

And don't get fooled by 108hp/84ft lbs.  You'll hit and float at triple digits with easy and after an ECU reflash by https://2wheeldynoworks.com/, it'll try to rip your arms off.  For a few months, I ran it with a borrowed Yoshimura pipe.  A cross-lane parallel twin, with a pipe "bumbs".  I hear the tune changes with an Arrow header.

 

It handled every potholed, washed out, hairpin, sweeper I could find in Marin/Sonoma and in my backyard Berkeley/Oakland Hills with aplomb and would only tell me to slow down when an ultra tight left turn kissed the drive shaft.  The solution was a tuned suspension but I knew my time with it was short. 

 

'12 and '13 were recalled for "a gap may develop in the protective sealant where the lead wires of the accelerator position sensor (APS) and throttle position sensor (TPS) connect to the electronic control unit (ECU). Though my Tenere was "fixed" I had to reperform the wiring as the recall tech installed it incorrectly.   

 

'14 to present updated to electronic suspension and other items I don't care to delve into.

 

Though it's much lighter than the Super Tenere, I just don't see myself buying the NT.  I'd rather get another Super Tenere for anywhere between $5-7k and send the ECU for a reflash and sort out the suspension.

 

 

20210607_101641.thumb.jpg.75128429a5beec5c3e3bc68d0b88e1e9.jpg

 

Though if they make this CBX4...

CB4X_EICMA_03.thumb.jpg.440f3a2b42e8422613aa19c641b95b8b.jpg

 

 

 

 If the Tenere was that good what made you sell it? shaft drive is the way to go. I am done with messy chains.

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On 11/12/2021 at 11:13 PM, mello dude said:

I own and have owned shaft bikes and chain bikes. Come new tire times, I would rather deal with the chain any day.

Interesting. I've not owned any other shaft bikes but the tyre change on the VFR1200 is simple, just like the 800; rotate end can out of the way, undo wheel bolts, remove wheel.

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15 hours ago, Kbear said:

 

 

For the "Gentleman tourer" eh?  😄

 

Front end the same as the VFR800, except for the mud guard, same rear wheel too. Why no centre stand?

 

I shall take a look at the Bike Show in Dec and book a test ride just to see if the engine lives up to his promise.

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11 hours ago, Skids said:

 

For the "Gentleman tourer" eh?  😄

 

 

 

Who wants a tamed, shaft driven P2 "VFR"?  Meh... me no likey.

 

PS: a prior meltdown of the VFRD server wiped out the pictures 😞

 

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13 hours ago, Dutchy said:

 

Who wants a tamed, shaft driven P2 "VFR"?  Meh... me no likey.

 

PS: a prior meltdown of the VFRD server wiped out the pictures 😞

 

You were riding the older Crossrunner, not the newer one based on the 2013+ 8th Gen. The Gentleman's seating position is the only real difference, which is great for my ageing back, and great that there is minimal performance difference....sadly more aerodynamic drag due to the larger front profile which probably reduces top speed, but then who spends any significant time at the end of the envelope? 

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3 hours ago, Skids said:

You were riding the older Crossrunner, not the newer one based on the 2013+ 8th Gen. The Gentleman's seating position is the only real difference, which is great for my ageing back, and great that there is minimal performance difference....sadly more aerodynamic drag due to the larger front profile which probably reduces top speed, but then who spends any significant time at the end of the envelope? 

For me and my aging body, it wasn't the upper body that gave me problems on my VFR; it was the lower body, specifically my knees (and especially the right one for some reason).  If I'd kept my 6th gen. I'd have to have lowered the footpegs.  Any ride over 2-3 hours had me popping my right knee very often, and sometimes during longer rides just dangling my legs once in a while during straight sections of road or on the freeway/interstate.

 

I should also mention that while my back was very rarely a problem, my neck would get very stiff during long rides, too, I think from "looking up" constantly in the crouched riding position.  The bike I bought to replace my VFR has similar ergonomics to the VFR, but somewhat relaxed compared to the VFR.  But even with those ergos, some owners install bar risers and a few lower footpegs, too.  I'm fine with both.

 

All this leads me to believe something like the new NT1100 would work great for me for long days and tours, which is what it's built for in the first place.

 

Also, I agree with the others -- this thing needs a centerstand.  Why on earth would you build a chain-driven ST machine and not include a centerstand on it?!

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6 hours ago, TimC said:

Also, I agree with the others -- this thing needs a centerstand.  Why on earth would you build a chain-driven ST machine and not include a centerstand on it?!

You could ask the same question of Kawasaki and Suzuki!

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