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Do you change tires at home?

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Just found these Nylon tire spoons. No rim protectors needed. Very well designed! Best $30.00 I ever spent. Now I just need my tires to get here.

 

The OEM Dunlops were pretty much done at 5k (3 trips to HWY 129) so I pulled the trigger on some Michelin Pilot power 2C. Anyone have feedback with a VFR on these tires? 

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Broke the end off one of those with a hard old tire so don't crank on 'em too hard.

 

I've run the classic Power front Road rear setup for many years. If it ain't broke......

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42 minutes ago, MBrane said:

Broke the end off one of those with a hard old tire so don't crank on 'em too hard.

 

I've run the classic Power front Road rear setup for many years. If it ain't broke......

That's what I was thinking, How could these hold up? I was careful and used a lot of soap. Also, I made sure the tires bead was deep in the well before attempting to remove the tire. I was expecting a struggle but it was easy. I know every tire is different.

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I have changed tires for quite a few riders on this forum.

IF you are coming this way to slay the dragon, I am not far from there, 20.00 a wheel and one hour of downtime.

You can have your favorite choice of tires shipped here. If you order from https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/

Tires are usually delivered to my address next day.

 

Check me out: http://www.ridewnc.net/services.html

 

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23 hours ago, MBrane said:

Broke the end off one of those with a hard old tire so don't crank on 'em too hard.

 

I've run the classic Power front Road rear setup for many years. If it ain't broke......

Same experience here with one of these, broke the end off, years ago.  Company requested a pic, and stated they would send a replacement, never did.  Did not purchase from them again.  Your experience will vary :biggrin:.

 

ACE

 

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There are a number of tires with very stiff sidewalls...I'm sure Dunlops or Brigestones will give a nylon tool a run for its money.

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Tires came in today, Michelin pilot power 2C. Very easy to mount. The first bead goes on easy by hand, then (just in case it gave me trouble) I zip tied the tire to the rim and pulled it tight into the rim well and spooned it on. It really couldn't have bean easier. 

 

For me it's not about saving money. I just want to know it was done right. I had a really bad experience at a dealership years ago and I just have a hard time turning my bike over to someone that's in a hurry to get the job done.  I use a torque wrench on every bolt, carefully remove the old wheel weights and balance the wheels to my satisfaction. It rides smooth, and turn in seems good. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, YYZ said:

 For me it's not about saving money. I just want to know it was done right. I had a really bad experience at a dealership years ago and I just have a hard time turning my bike over to someone that's in a hurry to get the job done.  I use a torque wrench on every bolt, carefully remove the old wheel weights and balance the wheels to my satisfaction. It rides smooth, and turn in seems good. 

When I do it myself, I know who to blame. There's no guarantee I've done it right.

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I mount my own tires and some for other people, but I have the HF tire changer. It works pretty well

all things considered. With a few modifications it works well without scratching the wheel. That was

why I started doing it myself. Had a shop really bugger up my wheels some years back.

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5 hours ago, FJ12Ryder said:

I mount my own tires and some for other people, but I have the HF tire changer. It works pretty well

all things considered. With a few modifications it works well without scratching the wheel. That was

why I started doing it myself. Had a shop really bugger up my wheels some years back.

Exactly, I’ll admit I’m particular about things like this. I asked a local shop it their mounting machine will scratch a painted rim and they said it happens. I appreciate the honesty and found a better option. 

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where is your tire balancer?

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18 hours ago, YYZ said:

For me it's not about saving money. I just want to know it was done right. I had a really bad experience at a dealership years ago and I just have a hard time turning my bike over to someone that's in a hurry to get the job done.  I use a torque wrench on every bolt, carefully remove the old wheel weights and balance the wheels to my satisfaction. It rides smooth, and turn in seems good. 

Absolutely the same reasons I change my own tires. 

 

For anyone else using the Harbor Freight changer, check out mojoblocks.  I also have the mojolever.  Good tools, if a bit expensive.  Can't recommend them enough.

 

1 hour ago, VFR750F3 said:

where is your tire balancer?

Not sure what he uses, but I've been using a Marc Parnes balancer for years.  I had the balance checked the first couple times and they were inconsequentially close.  Takes a bit of time to check, add weights, then check again, but at least I know it is done right.  I've made a set of "weights" that I tape on to do the balancing, then remove and stick the "permanent" weights on.

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i agree patience is a virtue and a level surface goes a long way,

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1 hour ago, VFR750F3 said:

where is your tire balancer?

I use a Marc Parnes Balancer. 

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I have used the HF in the past. The Marc Parnes balancers are much better.

balancer.JPG

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1 hour ago, MadScientist said:

Absolutely the same reasons I change my own tires. 

 

For anyone else using the Harbor Freight changer, check out mojoblocks.  I also have the mojolever.  Good tools, if a bit expensive.  Can't recommend them enough.

 

Not sure what he uses, but I've been using a Marc Parnes balancer for years.  I had the balance checked the first couple times and they were inconsequentially close.  Takes a bit of time to check, add weights, then check again, but at least I know it is done right.  I've made a set of "weights" that I tape on to do the balancing, then remove and stick the "permanent" weights on.

+1 to the Parnes balancer and Mojolever.  Together they make tire changes a job anyone can do well. 

 

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I do my own and pretty much all my friends who live close by too. I ended up buying a No-Mar Cycle Hill model changer kit. It came with a balancer and a couple of tire irons plus a couple other handy gadgets. I believe I paid $650 +/- for the kit. It’s more than paid for itself with my tire changes alone, more so if I include what my buddies give me, either in cash or beer!

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I have the Mojo Blocks for my HF changer, and the Third Hand Thingy from No Mar too. But I use a Coats mount/dismount bar, with

the nylon protectors. And a Marc Parnes balancer too.

 

Do you all check the wheel before mounting the tire, to see where the heavy spot is? Before I did that I always assumed the valve stem

was the heavy part of the wheel. Was surprised to see on most cast wheels I've done that the valve stem is the light area, guess because

of the material removed to create a place for the valve stem.

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9 minutes ago, FJ12Ryder said:

I have the Mojo Blocks for my HF changer, and the Third Hand Thingy from No Mar too. But I use a Coats mount/dismount bar, with

the nylon protectors. And a Marc Parnes balancer too.

 

Do you all check the wheel before mounting the tire, to see where the heavy spot is? Before I did that I always assumed the valve stem

was the heavy part of the wheel. Was surprised to see on most cast wheels I've done that the valve stem is the light area, guess because

of the material removed to create a place for the valve stem.

That's my setup, except I use the Mojo-bar...

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I use Snap-On or Derek Weaver computer balancer.

My changers are a Coats 220 or Derek Weaver which is the same model as the Coats Base Line.

 

I let the owner watch. It is hard to scratch a wheel with a decent machine, but it does happen.

 

Using sh1tty tools or tire irons can destroy the finish worse than a machine. My automatic machine puts all the force on the tire. It never prys against the wheel.

 

When I upped my price to twenty dollars per wheeel, one of my neighbors got all pissed at me and bought a Harbor Freight changer... After he f--Ked up his wheels, he is now coming back to me.

20.00 is more than reasonable to have someone with skill, experience and the proper tools work on your bike.

Here the average tire change is 50.00 to 80.00 per wheel. No one has better tools than I do. I am not even a shop or business. Just a rider doing tires by word of mouth.

 

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the honda dealership I work at is $80 per tire mount/balanced installed on bike if you provide tire. $30 for the same if we get your tires for you. all the dealers in my area are the same price, the difference is I change all the tires myself, no slackers in our shop.

 

at home I charge $40 for the same service with the same or better tools. only rule I have is no customers from work can be my at home customer. I do not advertise at all its just word of mouth and the people I ride with. in 15+ wheels I have only scratched 1 wheel on a kawi when I  was not paying attention and did not see the clip wheel weight on the lip of the wheel. talking about a oops that cost us a new wheel, that was the first week I worked at the dealership. never again

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This thread is mostly directed towards people who change their tires at home. I absolutely do not recommend everyone go out and buy these spoons and start changing tires. I was just happy to find a tool that worked so well for me. In the past I would use metal spoons with plastic to protect the wheels and that requires me to be very methodical just to get the tire off without trashing the rim. All in I have about $180.00 it tools. Thats a HF bead breaker, spoons, balancer and weights. It takes me about 3.5 hours to do two tires (thats a long time compared to tech that works at a dealership). The difference for me is that I like to do my own wrenching and I know it's done right. For me, its just another thing I enjoy doing almost as much as I do riding. For others it may be the last thing they want to do with their spare time. $30.00 to have a tire mounted is a great deal just as long as they're paying attention to what they're doing. I would give that tech a fat tip just to show my apreciation.

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On 6/12/2019 at 6:12 PM, Duc2V4 said:

I do my own and pretty much all my friends who live close by too. I ended up buying a No-Mar Cycle Hill model changer kit. It came with a balancer and a couple of tire irons plus a couple other handy gadgets. I believe I paid $650 +/- for the kit. It’s more than paid for itself with my tire changes alone, more so if I include what my buddies give me, either in cash or beer!

Still owe you lunch. 😁. I do my own old school but need to upgrade my kit. Have 4 dirtbikes and have gotten really good at them withe the bad buddy. Street tires are still a battle with Dunlops giving me the most grief on and off. But they make the best all around tires for my street riding. RS rear and Q3 front. For the track I will likely go with Q4s or Perelli super corsas if I can find them on sale. 

Some great info here to improve my gear otherwise I'll try and bribe a friend.

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12 hours ago, VFR Capt.Bob said:

Still owe you lunch. 😁. I do my own old school but need to upgrade my kit. Have 4 dirtbikes and have gotten really good at them withe the bad buddy. Street tires are still a battle with Dunlops giving me the most grief on and off. But they make the best all around tires for my street riding. RS rear and Q3 front. For the track I will likely go with Q4s or Perelli super corsas if I can find them on sale. 

Some great info here to improve my gear otherwise I'll try and bribe a friend.

Bribes are gladly accepted, Lagunitas IPA is always a good bribe. 😉

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