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Engine Braking

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There's no way to measure it but I was wondering how hard some of you twisty riders use engine braking.

If it weren't for twisties I wouldn't own a motorcycle.

I engine brake hard at times. In fact, if you ride The Dragon and other roads fast you will HAVE to engine brake hard along with being a very smooth rider. I feel better and safer using the bike brakes as little as possible and the VFR does engine brake well. I haven't seen any evidence in the three VFR's I've owned that it hurts the engine. The VFR engine will take a beating in my experience.

Just a curiosity question. Thanks.

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I use engine braking all the time, I do it with the Duc too! Both have great engine breaking attributes.

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I engine break a lot in the twisties. Not so much while riding relaxed and commuting.

Not aware of any issues engine breaking may cause. And even if it did, I'd still do it. Engine is just one of the wear items, which serve to provide me fun. If it wares out I will replace it.

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I engine brake even commuting. I've always done it since I started riding and I just like the sound of blipping the throttle.

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Saved my ass on going through the twisties when a fawn jump out in front, instinctively killed the throttle before I had time to brake. It came out the other side unscathed. Guess it is a function FI bikes, my 83 doesn't do it.

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I engine break a lot in the twisties. Not so much while riding relaxed and commuting.

Not aware of any issues engine breaking may cause. And even if it did, I'd still do it. Engine is just one of the wear items, which serve to provide me fun. If it wares out I will replace it.

How many engines have you broken? :491:

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I'm also a card carrying member of the engine braking club.

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I'm still a newbie so i'm busy trying to build good habits by braking a little before any turn(even if engine braking is doing most of the work), that way if i do need a sudden stop i've already initiated it. If i get used to just rolling off the throttle to slow down for corners and a deer pops in front of me i might just instinctually chop the throttle and be toast.

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wish my bike was like a 2 stroke.......engines to go and brakes to slow most of the time...

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Everyone uses engine braking, even if you don't realise, and it will not hurt anything unless you end up with the rear wheel hopping.

The only way not to use engine braking is to pull the clutch.

If the clutch is engaged and you are decelerating, then you are using some amount of engine braking.

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wish my bike was like a 2 stroke.......engines to go and brakes to slow most of the time...

You could restore an old Kawa triple, then sell it to me cheap.

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Everyone should be engine braking, I can't imagine not doing it.

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I engine break a lot in the twisties. Not so much while riding relaxed and commuting.

Not aware of any issues engine breaking may cause. And even if it did, I'd still do it. Engine is just one of the wear items, which serve to provide me fun. If it wares out I will replace it.

How many engines have you broken? :491:

None. Good point.

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Everyone should be engine braking, I can't imagine not doing it.

+1. Not sure it's ever occurred to me to not use engine braking? Who just holds the clutch in when they're slowing down?

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Everyone should be engine braking, I can't imagine not doing it.

+1. Not sure it's ever occurred to me to not use engine braking? Who just holds the clutch in when they're slowing down?

The comparison is using the brakes vs. engine braking. It is good for you to bring up "coasting" as a point of reference. You are right in that one should not coast but should always be in a gear and an RPM range appropriate for accelerating due to the unexpected.

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Everyone should be engine braking, I can't imagine not doing it.

It's a tool in the box, But.... You can't modulate the braking force as much with the throttle as you can with the brake lever. Engine braking also has less effect on chassis geometry than the brakes do, if you are into tip in feel and stuff like that.....Great when it's a lazy pace road with smooth transition curves and good visibility, just roll off and on. Toss in some 20mph turns, or blind ones, on a 40-50 mph curvy road and it's time for brakes imho

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I engine break a lot in the twisties. Not so much while riding relaxed and commuting.

Not aware of any issues engine breaking may cause. And even if it did, I'd still do it. Engine is just one of the wear items, which serve to provide me fun. If it wares out I will replace it.

How many engines have you broken? :491:

None so far :comp13:

Try as I can.

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I engine brake in all conditions on all bikes, always have.

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Modulating engine braking is done primarily with the clutch...a good trackda school or class can give folks a great chance to practice...I learned from Jason Pridmore at his Star School, he gave Nicky Hayden a few pointers also...watch Nicky's clutch hand in some videos...shows a lot.

Matt

Everyone should be engine braking, I can't imagine not doing it.

It's a tool in the box, But.... You can't modulate the braking force as much with the throttle as you can with the brake lever. Engine braking also has less effect on chassis geometry than the brakes do, if you are into tip in feel and stuff like that.....Great when it's a lazy pace road with smooth transition curves and good visibility, just roll off and on. Toss in some 20mph turns, or blind ones, on a 40-50 mph curvy road and it's time for brakes imho

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Honda recommends it (on downhills) straight out the owners manual:

What can I say I was bored at work one night and read through the whole thing.

post-31918-0-11299600-1460574314.jpeg

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As HighSideNZ says...it's a natural part of riding. It'll become second nature!

I've been out of bikes for awhile, but remember friends of my sister's bought first Ninja 900.. accelerated heavily then tapped off and bent the crank. Think they'd only had the bike a month...costly.

Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Tapatalk

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Just one tip of advise, even though I'm a very fresh motorcyclist. If you're motor braking in "regular traffic", put a finger on the brake hadle so the brake light lights up, otherwise you might get someone hitting you from behind.

 

/R

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Being smooth out in the bendy bits requires a rider to establish a
brake less pace... that means to adjust corner entrance speed with
throttle alone... if a rider doesn't learn to judge the speed of the
corner with throttle alone they'll never learn by adding brakes...
brakes make cornering a lot more complicated than it is... so keep it
simple... just roll off and roll on... and once you start rolling it
on keep it on....

 

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Anytime the throttle is less than neutral, you are getting some engine braking.

Bikes get more than cars. I'm thinking twins that rev get more than 4's.

I am not considering 2 smokes.

 

Roll on, roll off. The roller. :cool:

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