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This is what happens...


Skids
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...when you commute 100 miles+ each day up the highway instead of the twisties. ☹️

 

Front tyre, Metzeller Roadtec 1 after around 11k miles.

20211231_132953.jpg

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That is an unusual wear pattern, especially if you're on a highway a lot. what PSI cold/hot do you run? 

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22 minutes ago, bmart said:

That is an unusual wear pattern, especially if you're on a highway a lot. what PSI cold/hot do you run? 


Not really. I’ve seen it on a lot of bikes, including my own, that spend the majority of their time straight up and down. 

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Do tell. The middle looks like it has the least wear, and partial lean looks like it gets major braking under lean. 

 

Also curious if that pic is on the wheel or off. I know that when we take the track front tires off, the issues look exagerated (and highlight the problem we can't see when inflated on the rim). 

 

Thanks for posting!

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You got 11k out of a tire. Replace it and enjoy some twisties before the tire gets cupped from commuting again. Maybe get a tire that has a harder rubber on those sections.

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11k is amazing...but I'd never ride on tires that look like that (for safety reasons)! 😛 I get 2500-4000 out of a set and the rear is completely done by then. I remember running Metzlers back in the 80s/90s and they wore like iron. 

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So many questions:

 

36psi cold.

 

Wheel off.

 

No idea, tyre rolling away from camera.

 

Sadly not possible, my 52 mile commute each way would be 100+ if I tried x-country twisties.

 

11k miles is fairly standard, even when I ride x-country. Rear does around 8k. 

 

Tyres are Metzeller Roadtec 1's. similar to PR5 and they are an all-weather tyre, perfect for British roads where you can see 4 seasons in one day.

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I tried to find some pics to post but was unsuccessful. At the track (and even to some degree on the street if they're mostly agressive miles) we usually see a lot of wear at the common lean angle, front and back. When the tires come off of the wheels, the wear is really accentuated visually (front from trail braking and rear from acceleratoin out of corners. 

 

Under stress (I am mean to my motorcycle tires!), what this creates is a high point on each side of the wear area (more and less lean) where there is less traction and a thin tire tread which does not hold heat like one with more rubber. Both of these things limit traction and it sucks finding that limit. 

 

Appreciate the info!

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Typical ridge of a dual compound tire..... I'd up the pressure to at least 38, but some of that wear may be due to the nature of the Metzeler 01.  If you got 11k miles out of that, then be happy...... looks like you have more to go unless you're at the wear bars in the middle.

If you want to try a single compound front, an Angel GT would suit.

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On 12/31/2021 at 8:43 AM, Skids said:

...when you commute 100 miles+ each day up the highway instead of the twisties. ☹️

 

Front tyre, Metzeller Roadtec 1 after around 11k miles.

20211231_132953.jpg

11k miles?! I may try these tires. I have a hard time to get more than 4k miles out of my tires (front or back) This is a picture of my front tire after 3.6k miles. No highway,  just backroads. It looks like the alignment was off (and it was off by 20mm) however, the new tire shows the same wear pattern, even with corrected alignment.

IMG_2049.jpg

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That looks pretty unusual. Any chance you're hanging onto the bars tightly and actually leaned a bit when going straight? 😏

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1 hour ago, bmart said:

That looks pretty unusual. Any chance you're hanging onto the bars tightly and actually leaned a bit when going straight? 😏

Funny you ask. It is quite the opposite, I let the bike do the work with little input. I noticed though that I like left turns better than right turns and therefore accelerate much harder out of a left turn which I like a lot. I also noticed that on my home loop (pretty much a daily ride) the nicer turns are left.

This tire was ridden for 2.5k or so where the rear to front wheel was 20mm off (and it went straight as an arrow with no shimmy) The new tire shows the same pattern just not as pronounced after 3k. Thanks for the question, it made me rethink my riding process details.

 

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7 hours ago, Wald said:

11k miles?! I may try these tires. I have a hard time to get more than 4k miles out of my tires (front or back) This is a picture of my front tire after 3.6k miles. No highway,  just backroads. It looks like the alignment was off (and it was off by 20mm) however, the new tire shows the same wear pattern, even with corrected alignment.

 

 

What tyres are they? Mine are ST-oriented and therefore longer lasting than more sports-oriented tyres but with less dry grip. If yours are sportier, that would explain the difference in mileage available. 

 

Being based in the UK, we need to cover all weathers in the same day with our tyres, so wet weather grip is just as important throughout the year.

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On 1/4/2022 at 1:21 AM, Skids said:

What tyres are they? Mine are ST-oriented and therefore longer lasting than more sports-oriented tyres but with less dry grip. If yours are sportier, that would explain the difference in mileage available. 

These are Continental Motion, a budget ST tire. It came with the bike, so I gave it a shot. Surprisingly, it sticks really well and warms up quick, even in 40 deg F weather. One really good property is, these are not sensitive to tar snakes at any temperature. As for rain, only rode in the rain few times, it was ok but I would not qualify to make a judgement. In the reviews I have seen, most riders get around 8k miles.

Since I do not tour, just rip around on backroads, it may explain the rapid wear.

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1 hour ago, Wald said:

These are Continental Motion, a budget ST tire. It came with the bike, so I gave it a shot. Surprisingly, it sticks really well and warms up quick, even in 40 deg F weather. One really good property is, these are not sensitive to tar snakes at any temperature. As for rain, only rode in the rain few times, it was ok but I would not qualify to make a judgement. In the reviews I have seen, most riders get around 8k miles.

Since I do not tour, just rip around on backroads, it may explain the rapid wear.


Interestingly, I tried a set of those on a Tiger 1050. With Traxxion Dynamics AK-20’s in the forks and a Penske, the front still cupped to heck. 

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Wearing a set on my ‘96, no cupping yet but can’t stop an irritating deceleration shake. Doesn’t hurt anything, just driving me to distraction. Tried everything short of changing to a different tire, nothing I’ve done even affects it!

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All of my Hondas stop doing it when I switch to Tapered Steering Bearings.  I can take both hands off the bars decelerating anytime without a hint of wanting to shake.  Even on my bikes where I have jacked up the rear ride height and slid the forks up in the clamps.  Rock solid.

 

It doesn't take long for ball bearings to start an indent, even if you can't feel it, where the front wants to hunt back and forth a little.

 

Also, when I worked in Service for a Honda Dealership, the official answer from Honda was there was no problem if it doesn't persist with 2 fingers resting on each grip.

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1 hour ago, Captain 80s said:

All of my Hondas stop doing it when I switch to Tapered Steering Bearings.  I can take both hands off the bars decelerating anytime without a hint of wanting to shake.  Even on my bikes where I have jacked up the rear ride height and slid the forks up in the clamps.  Rock solid.

 

Would you happen to have the part numbers for the taper bearing switchover?

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1 hour ago, Fritzer said:

Would you happen to have the part numbers for the taper bearing switchover?

 

If you are willing to use emerging economy made bearings...

 

All Balls 22-1020

 

I am for steering bearings.  I've never had an issue on probably 10 of my personal bikes by now.

 

Good luck otherwise.

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To add to that, if you're going to bother to do the job, steer as clear as you can of All Balls products. Economy is a kind description. 

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Only thing I do to stop the wiggle is touch the grips lightly, hoping Honda is right as I’m too lazy for the brg change, works fine & not dangerous...

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46 minutes ago, bmart said:

To add to that, if you're going to bother to do the job, steer as clear as you can of All Balls products. Economy is a kind description. 

 

Please point me (us) to a good US bearing house.  I will use All Balls for steering bearings, no problem.

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I've had All Balls tapered roller steering bearings on my bike since 2005.  Originals were in good condition, but I had a lot less headshake and wobbles with the rollers installed.  Not sure about the comments about All Balls and quality, but I got mine a loooooong time ago and everyone was all about them back then.

 

In general, first culprit in front tire cupping is the suspension to me.  When I repurchased my bike it hadn't had the suspension serviced since I did it in 2008 or so, and it was full of sludge.  When I full-serviced the front it started smoothing out the cupping, just like when I originally installed the valves and springs I have now

 

If we're talking about cupping causes of course...hard to tell where this thread is going... 🤣

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Wasn't trying to go off topic.  Just I've had bikes that would shake no matter what, with different brand new tires along with proper (straight rate) springs and valving.

 

Tapered rollers instantly cured all of them.

 

Never had any inclination of a problem with All Balls Tapered Steering Bearings for over 25 years.  And ALL of the customer bikes too.

 

Some bikes are just hard on front tires and can cup early.  90 - 96 CBR1000F is a finicky one of them for example.

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