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On 12/19/2020 at 11:55 PM, Cogswell said:

 

Don't be too sure about my tool selection - LOL! - my bead breaker is a 2x4 secured to the wall by a satellite dish mount with a short 2x2 piece bolted to the 2x4 - press down on the 2x4 and the 2x2 then presses down on the bead - total hillbilly / redneck setup.  :laugh:  It does work though.  The car wheel is placed on a workbench with a steel rod sticking up out of the bench for the mojolever to get leverage against.  The mojolever definitely saves the wheel from scratches.  Enough soapy water or bead lube makes it a one person job. 

 

 

Hi Cogs

 

I see we watched the same Youtube video. I drilled a hole in one of my garages 2X4's and mounted mine there.🙂

 

Hillbilly/Redneck?

 

Its actually quite sophisticated🙂.

 

Ten years ago I flew out to Iowa to pick up my 97. The owner had said the rear had maybe 1500 miles left on it so I had a Bridgestone S20 sent to his house. I left Portland around 0530 and arrived at his house about 5 hours later. It was Saturday so the local shop that did his tires was closed, So I removed the rear and had a look around. I placed some short 2X4's on the front sill of his garage door, then the tire on them, Did a quick measure then cut a 2X4 about 4" longer than the distance between the bead and the joist above it. Stuck it in on an angle then grabbed a hammer. Took less than 5 minutes to remove the tire, I did bring my Motion Pro tire irons with me. I asked him for some furniture polish and lubed the bead and had the new tire on the rim a few minutes later. Knew because there is no real rear axle that balancing would be an issue so had ordered some dyna beads also and threw them in. The longest part of the procedure was getting his little pancake compressor to actually seat the bead. Rear was back on the bike in maybe 45 minutes.

 

We were cleaning up his Garage when he stopped and looked over and blurted out, "That.....That  That was totally Caveman!" Something I have never been accused of before or since.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here’s my tire usage for the year. My year to date mileage  is approaching 28000 .   Set1 Installed Feb 14; Metzeler Roadtecs (Tires cost $324.73) mounted at 44200 Mi Notes: High Flow O

I have the HF tire machine, along with the Mojolever and Marc Parnes balancer. I do at least 8 sets of tires a year for myself, and another few dozen for friends. I only charge them a 6 pack of Hazy I

Oregon has always been forward thinking - way ahead of the curve.  These days in other states these are known as "Covid chains".   Rather than outlawing road grime as they did here, governors lock dow

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8 hours ago, RC79NC001 said:

I see that many people like the idea of changing their own tires. I'm cool with that but I also like the idea of supporting my local 

 

independent ( and competent ) motorcycle shop. They are really good guys and I enjoy going to visit them. I think they are enjoying

 

the fact that I ride so much and burn through lots of consumables like tires .

 

From Maine has the  great idea of posting the new tire stickers on the fridge . I stick mine on the columns of storage shelves in the back of

 

my garage. It's like  your own personal history of tires !

 

IMG_a3706.thumb.jpg.259e28997eee0781b7919c29b515fe0b.jpgIMG_a3705.thumb.jpg.35becddbb3b214add75d6059a1b737e4.jpg

 Hats off to you for supporting a local and trusted shop.

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Every time I get a new set of tires I ponder getting my own equipment and doing it myself. This thread (thanks RC79) has got me thinking about it again. But with "only" two bikes, and my mileage down this year, I'm on the fence once again.

 

One advantage no one has mentioned is that when you change your own tires, you don't have to change both at the same time--a real plus. Whether because of uneven front/rear wear, or a puncture, tires rarely reach their final mile in unison. And I just won't make individual trips to my shop to change a single tire, only to return a month or two later for the other one. But replacing rubber with miles remaining really bugs me...

 

But, I use an independent local shop, run by a former U.K. motocrosser and a former Honda dealer mechanic. Prices are reasonable and they do quality work. And they are just a long walk from my house, which is a real plus for my marriage. No one has to ferry me to and fro, and no one is reminded how much of the household budget goes to bikes!

 

I do have Pirelli Angels on the RC, but otherwise I switched from Dunlop to Michelin about 10 years ago and have never looked back.

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A couple of other things about DIY'ing it is that the money that would otherwise go to the shop to mount the new tires can go to getting the tires you really want vs buying a lesser tire to keep the whole thing within budget.  The OP's analysis of the ST's vs the GT's is interesting - buy a longer lasting tire at a higher price point, or change them more often. 

 

Another for me is that I usually hate the handling so much by the time they're shot that I change them before they get to the wear bars. That's a personal preference but if I'm not paying for mounting that hurts less.  I've been running Road 2's now for about 10 years and despite the new versions that have come out (I had a set of PR3's and PR4's and liked neither - have not tried the PR5's) have stuck with them.   My current set has 7,500 miles of touring and moderate to aggressive sport riding.  With that same blend these look like they'll make 10,000 miles.  With the consolidation in the motosports e-tailers, they seem much less common or now unavailable, tho the Michelin store on Amazon has them in sets.  A few have gotten old date coded sets, but most are saying theirs were made in 2020.  image.png.f4bb26737a02f5f55b33b849d208f329.png 

 

image.png.e9cc3bb63f7de2bd410bb1da8b599029.png

 

 

 

 

 

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The HF tire changer has a built in bead breaker, and for the price it's really a deal.

 

 In the summer time, I set the first wheel I take off out in the sun, then take off the other. By that time, the first one is ripe for removal, and the second is easy as well. Winter time is a different story. Now that I'm a track junkie, I have learned to put my tire warmers on after I get the wheels off the bike and in 15 minutes they are soft and pliable! As soon as I take them out to dis-mount, the new set goes into the warmers. The new set is ready to mount in no time. Makes winter tire changes a snap!

 

JUST BE SURE TO LEAVE THE LABELS ON UNTIL THE TIRES COME OUT OF THE WARMERS!

(otherwise the glue will leave burn marks in your warmers)

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I used the HF tire changer for almost 15 years and it worked fine. The wife got me a NoMar gift certificate a couple years ago though and it is a nice piece of equipment. Still using the HF balancer though.

 

The closest shop to me is a good 45 minute drive each way so just prefer to have tires shipped and mount myself.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Cogswell said:

A couple of other things about DIY'ing it is that the money that would otherwise go to the shop to mount the new tires can go to getting the tires you really want vs buying a lesser tire to keep the whole thing within budget.  The OP's analysis of the ST's vs the GT's is interesting - buy a longer lasting tire at a higher price point, or change them more often. 

 

Another for me is that I usually hate the handling so much by the time they're shot that I change them before they get to the wear bars. That's a personal preference but if I'm not paying for mounting that hurts less.  I've been running Road 2's now for about 10 years and despite the new versions that have come out (I had a set of PR3's and PR4's and liked neither - have not tried the PR5's) have stuck with them.   My current set has 7,500 miles of touring and moderate to aggressive sport riding.  With that same blend these look like they'll make 10,000 miles.  With the consolidation in the motosports e-tailers, they seem much less common or now unavailable, tho the Michelin store on Amazon has them in sets.  A few have gotten old date coded sets, but most are saying theirs were made in 2020.  image.png.f4bb26737a02f5f55b33b849d208f329.png 

 

image.png.e9cc3bb63f7de2bd410bb1da8b599029.png

 

 

 

That is the cleanest Rear Sprocket and Chain I have ever seen.

Do you guys like not have dirt in Oregon?

2 hours ago, Cogswell said:

 

 

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38 minutes ago, FromMaine said:

Do you guys like not have dirt in Oregon?

 

Nope. Well, we still have agricultural soil and what have you, but Governor Vic Atiyeh outlawed road grime and chain splatter back in the 80s. It's funny nobody thought of that sooner. Really did the trick.

 

These days everybody's rear wheels and hubs are as spotless as Cogswell's.

 

No reason you couldn't try the same thing in New England. Write your governor.

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On 12/13/2020 at 12:08 AM, RC79NC001 said:

I used to love Michelins on my SV650S but, the Road 5s are too expensive...imho.

Michelin Pilot Road 2's are still in production and are now a lot cheaper then they used to be. If you like the Pirellis then you will like the PR2 too.

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PR2s were my go to 10 yrs ago on my SV650S. I loved them. However I am happily in a Pirelli rut for now. I've been thinking about

 

trying Dunlop RS3 tires . They are about $250 a set on Amazon but, I've read enough bad ( with good ) to scare me off. The fact that

 

several bikes I bought including this one came with OEM Dunlops and they were awful has biased me I admit. Woops, back to PR2s...

 

I might givem' a try.

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9 hours ago, St. Stephen said:

Every time I get a new set of tires I ponder getting my own equipment and doing it myself. This thread (thanks RC79) has got me thinking about it again. But with "only" two bikes, and my mileage down this year, I'm on the fence once again.

 

One advantage no one has mentioned is that when you change your own tires, you don't have to change both at the same time--a real plus. Whether because of uneven front/rear wear, or a puncture, tires rarely reach their final mile in unison. And I just won't make individual trips to my shop to change a single tire, only to return a month or two later for the other one. But replacing rubber with miles remaining really bugs me...

 

But, I use an independent local shop, run by a former U.K. motocrosser and a former Honda dealer mechanic. Prices are reasonable and they do quality work. And they are just a long walk from my house, which is a real plus for my marriage. No one has to ferry me to and fro, and no one is reminded how much of the household budget goes to bikes!

 

I do have Pirelli Angels on the RC, but otherwise I switched from Dunlop to Michelin about 10 years ago and have never looked back.

Well said. 

 

I also like to determine which tire actually needs replacement, also like to occasionally pull my tires and check balance and bearings.

 

There is not a shop within a 100 miles from me I would feel comfortable bringing my bikes to, wish there was some days as it would be so much easier.

 

 

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21 hours ago, FromMaine said:

Do you guys like not have dirt in Oregon?

 


Oh,that . . . I have a chain oiler and switched over to running Simple Green through it - works great!  :tongue::laugh:

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21 hours ago, RobF said:

 

Nope. Well, we still have agricultural soil and what have you, but Governor Vic Atiyeh outlawed road grime and chain splatter back in the 80s. It's funny nobody thought of that sooner. Really did the trick.

 

These days everybody's rear wheels and hubs are as spotless as Cogswell's.

 

No reason you couldn't try the same thing in New England. Write your governor.

 

Oregon has always been forward thinking - way ahead of the curve.  These days in other states these are known as "Covid chains".   Rather than outlawing road grime as they did here, governors lock down their states mandating that all riders "shelter in place".  Without any riding going on, chains stay in as-new condition.  Of course, if you want to put a mask on your chain you may be allowed to ride if traveling to shop for essentials such as chain lube or micro fiber rags - and of course you must park your bike at least six feet from other bikes to ensure no grime or splatter is transferred to another chain.  Under no circumstances may a bike be parked inside near other bikes where chain filth is more likely to be inadvertently spread to other chains.  There have been reports of riders hoarding chain lube and rags - governors have been urging riders to only buy what they need and "leave some for others".   This policy I believe originated in California and has spread to other states such as New York and elsewhere where the incidence of filthy chains is high.   Chain manufacturers are suffering as a result and have applied for Federal PPP aid to get through the crisis. 

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Ok, here's an addition to the original story.

 

 

Set5  Installed Oct 22; Pirelli STs (Tires cost $215) mounted at 66147 Mi.

Notes: Pirellis impress with excellent  feel and ride for a great price.  Replaced at 71598 Mi. They lasted 5451 Miles. The front still had some life in it. These tires feel great all the way to the end.

 

Set6  Installed Dec 22; Pirelli STs (Tires cost $215) mounted at 71598 Mi.

Notes: Feel great right out of the box but, took it easy on the ride back from the shop. Rode aggressively yesterday. I feel comfortable and confident with them.

 

2021; Michelin PR2 ? Dunlop Road Smart 3 ? More Angel ST ? We'll see !

 

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I have used Dunlop Roadsmart 3s since removing the OEM D222s.
 

The OEMs were frightful and downright dangerous, but I think the RS3s are fine. I have read the opposite opinions and was wondering what exactly do riders feel is wrong with them.

 

I’m not hooked on RS3 but when the front and back never need replacement at the same time the default is always matching same with same.

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If only all the magazine testers ( or any potential owner ) would ride a VFR shod with something other then the stock rubber, the world would be a better place. Ditto with how any rider would enjoy this motorcycle after a proper suspension upgrade.  I'm afraid I suffer from bias against the Dunlop brand. RS3s are the same money as the Michelin PR2s on Amazon. I had great experiences with them (PR2s) years ago.Let's see how I feel in the spring when they ( hopefully ) go on.        

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In the 1970s Dunlop K81s were the go to tyres for Kwaka Mach iv production racers. Not as many options back then!

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5 hours ago, RC79NC001 said:

My first VFR related purchase for 2021....a set of Michelin PR2s from Amazon. $240. Yeehaw !

 

It would be helpful to us other PR2 fans to know what date codes you receive.  

 

Many thanks

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On 1/2/2021 at 6:08 PM, VFR78 said:

In the 1970s Dunlop K81s were the go to tyres for Kwaka Mach iv production racers. Not as many options back then!

Remember when K591s came out? They still make them!!!

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You can still buy K81s (TT100) also, for bikes like the  Kwaka W800. Really starting to show our age here. 

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On 12/10/2020 at 4:30 AM, RC79NC001 said:

Set1 Installed Feb 14; Metzeler Roadtecs (Tires cost $324.73) mounted at 44200 Mi

Notes: High Flow Oil Filter installed during service for tires. This filter developed a gradual leak that eventually coated part of the rear tire. Metzelers had accumulated approximately 4200 mi when this occurred. No more non-OEM oil filters for me !

Hi RC79.

Sorry to be a little off topic, but I'm curious about your Hi Flo oil filter failure. I've used heaps of these (HF204's) and have been my go to filter since 2005 without issues.

 

Do you recall if the filter fitted was a HF204RC with the known fail issue of the spot welded hex nut on the top of the can, like the K&N?

 

A properly fitted non OEM type filter, provided it doesn't have the spot welded hex nut should never leak, car or bike!

 

Things to note - 

- a visual check to be sure that the previous oil filter seal is Not stuck on the mounting flange.

- clean mounting flange, wipe with a clean rag.

- lightly oiled new oil filter seal.

- the new filter is only firmly hand tightened.

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