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Grum

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Everything posted by Grum

  1. Hi Skids. Ok it does appear the previous owner would have had this done to lower the seat height. You can purchase lowering plates that do the same job but hopefully they wouldn't block access to the adjuster. So it does appear yours needs a rotation of one position clockwise to have it back to normal position. My 8gen is exactly as your last drawing and the small arrow must point forward. Can't offer more than that!
  2. Well ok then. If ever I feel my rear brakes "Suck", I will definetly consider the steel lines. Since I do a brake flush/bleed every 12 months, just haven't had anything to complain about with the 8gen rear brakes even after 77,000k's. Again YMMV. Cheers.
  3. I'm obviously missing something! But what is the benefit in going to all this trouble for the rear brake line replacement on a relatively new bike? After all, it seems like a lot of it is steel line anyway! I understand especially for the front system it will give a more positive brake feel and possible greater hose life. But is there much to be gained by doing the rear? Never had any issue or need for rear brake hose replacement especially on relatively new bikes! I'm not talking of race track applications here, just normal road use. Just wondering, YMMV.
  4. Hi Terry. I think our two head lift stands from two different companies appear to be so identical perhaps they were made in the same factory! Glad I got the faster colour!
  5. Have a head lift stand made by Kaneg, check out their web site, they have a huge range of stands. Find this is just brilliant for dropping the front wheel, works great combined with the bikes center stand. Not sure if this is what you're after.
  6. Sorry m8 no can help. But keep your eyes on any motorcycle wreckers around you, you never know your luck, might get a full instrument panel cheaply. Or you can carry out a much neater track repair on your original, it's not at the point of being scrap just yet!
  7. Very nice photos flya750. Agree with you just love my own dreamy 8gen.
  8. Well I guess you're showing us all this stuff because you didn't do it! That's horrible pcb track repair. Best ya tidy this up as well! Any other good wiring mods you've found on the bike???. Electrical reliability is sitting on a knife edge with your bike!
  9. Some serious attention required on that lot, what a bloody mess. Either a proper wire repair or new wire bypass, needs to be sorted ASAP.! Surely that's not your bike is it Kiwi.....? Good luck with the repairs.
  10. Grum

    RVF1000R

    Absolutely superb, oh to get my hands on one of those! Beautiful shot of a truly beautiful machine.
  11. Wow......very bad case of MBD you have there VifferJ! Lucky you. Registration fees, insurance etc just makes having a museum of motorcycles way too cost prohibitive here in Auz. Looks like you've got all the right advice. AGM batteries are fine sitting idle provided they get a good charge every month or there abouts. If your batteries were Electrolyte Flooded, old style wet cells, you'd need to be more diligent. Cycling your charger amongst all your toys is fine. Cheers.
  12. Think this needs a little clarification! The Fuel Cut Relay doesn't provide a power pulse! It provides solid 12v to the Fuel Pump if Ignition pulses are detected at the relay. The pulsating of the fuel pump is a characteristic of this type of pump.
  13. Also the Service Manual doesn't offer much in the way of description. It just offers a continuity and voltage check of the three wires to the relay. Its operation though is to simply disable the fuel pump if the engine is not running.
  14. That's all good stuff Cogswell but isn't FromMaine referring to the Fuel Cut Relay on a 4gen? Looking at the circuit diagram this is a special 3 pin relay that is energized by ignition pulses, then sends power to the Fuel Pump. So it doesn't appear to be the normal relay coil arrangement, possibly electronic! Not too sure how you would test this relay outside of the bike. I believe some 4gen owners just link the relay out and don't bother with it! Sorry, I have no experience with a 4gen.
  15. Standard unleaded here in Australia is 91ron which the VFR is designed for. Premiums are 95 and 98ron non ethanol and due to the additives to increase octane has the effect of lowering volatility. Ethanol blended fuels are also available here, largely E10. Believe your standard fuel 87aki is equivalent to our 91ron. In general increasing ethanol content increases octane rating but decreases volatility as well. The greater the volatility the better for cold starting. There are known issues with cars that don't require premium fuels that do suffer badly from cold starting on premi
  16. Starter valve synch. Note this link for getting correct valve offset. Has a huge effect on idle and small throttle opening.
  17. Never owned a 5th gen. Love the lighter feel of the 8gen, plus all its added features and better fuel economy. Funny, I must be one of the odd ones, I've never liked the whine of gear driven cams! As to your starting issues I mentioned fuel type, are you running premium high octane fuel?
  18. Correct. Without any vacuum applied to the diaphragm it is spring loaded to the open position. When the control solenoid is energized it allows vacuum to act on the diaphragm pulling the flapper to the closed position. The other option is to simply pull the vacuum hose off the flapper diaphragm and plug/seal the vacuum hose. The flapper will be fully open. I've used the end of a drill just the right size to plug the hose in the past. Guess what you're trying to isolate is either a noisy diaphragm or a noisy solenoid. Just for info - I've removed all the hardware of t
  19. What you're describing is basically when the flapper is directed by the ECM to close during low rpm. The flapper is in the normally open state during mid to high rpm settings. So I'm sure what you're hearing is to do with this system and electrically unplugging the control solenoid should confirm this for you. Could even be a squeeky/noisy vacuum diaphragm. It's also a system you can do without. Cheers
  20. Another thing to be aware of for cold starting is what fuel you are using? The higher the octane number the less volatile is the fuel, this can certainly have an effect of poor starting in cold conditions. So try using the minimum octane rated fuel suitable for your bike in your country, see if that makes a difference. There is no benefit in running a VFR (except for a 7gen) on higher than required octane fuels. Certainly avoid Ethanol blended fuels IF you can. How old is your battery? Your charging voltage is good but your battery may be down on capacity. I know I'm repe
  21. Would first try the variable intake (Flapper) solenoid first, just unplug the electrical connector, see how it goes. A dirty clutch switch can cause the solenoid to make strange noises. Also remove the air filter and inspect the area, make sure everything looks normal in the airbox. The other issue which causes more of a clatter sound is a faulty CCT (cam chain tensioner). Good luck keep us posted with what you find.
  22. Further to what Terry suggested and assuming you have no added wiring. The R/R and clock circuit are the only items that should have power to them with ignition to off. Try unplugging your main connection to the R/R for a while see what that does, or place your multi meter in series with the battery negative lead to read current. Maximum leakage current with ignition Off is 2.5ma for a 6gen. Good luck.
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