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Toolkit suggestions for long trip?


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Thanks for the info Fritzer. That looks like a great bit of kit. Know what you mean regards the Co2 bottles, I carry a small hi pressure bicycle hand pump to top up. But that little compressor looks very neat.:fing02:

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This is an excellent thread, some great ideas for tools, and puncture repair kitting for your bike.   My own 2cents worth, your best weapon for anything going wrong is a very well maintained

This is an interesting thread for me. Because of the nature of my job I spend a lot of time overseas, on ships. When I do get back to Maine I don't spend much time riding to town or locally, I try to

Thanks all for your replies!  Duly noted.  Attached is the gist of my route.  Spain to Bulgaria. 🙂

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The problem with hand pumps in getting enough air in fast enough if you have an (undiscovered) leak.   I also use a compressor as got fed up with using the cylinders - although they do work - but have to carry more than you think to get a rear tyre to work at correct psi..

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And the other problem with a bicycle pump small enough to fit under the seat would need 300+? strokes to get rear up to pressure.  Very tedious.

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Hello ,

 

I have been getting my VFR ready to tour/get out just as soon as we are released. 

 

If you are going to France, the first thing I 100% recommend is security. The French love stealing and I have never been to France without them trying to steal my mode of transport ever. 

 

This is what I have done so far and I am not into hard wiring stuff running many cables and drilling , screwing and doing things that I can't reverse. 

I have a tank bag with a power bank in it and run everything from there . It works for me and I can take it all with me when parked up. If staying in rooms then I can re-charge it and everything else overnight, plus have intelligent optimate USB under the seat for other charging duties with a splitter cable so I can charge more than 1 thing at a time if needed.

 

1761980456_CHARGEPOINTS.thumb.jpg.f8f97af0edf0383a082fd7e86becb35d.jpg

 

 

 

Double charge points. SAE and CTEK , covers every accessory possible.

 

 

 

 

1871359958_OPTIMATEUSB.thumb.jpg.37c2fc8be0d9b3a14eae85f595fe3e01.jpg

 

I use an optimate usb . I like it because its detachable and its intelligent. If it detects the battery running low then it stops.

 

31847247.jpg

 

 

Power bank . MSC Overlander waterproof power bank. 600 amp peak power and this will jump start anything and will provide power for many other things and it has a inbuilt torch.  I power everything from this powerbank. I normally have it in my tank bag and connect my phone to it for waze / nav functions, , and if its running low I have a  cable connected to the usb under the seat so it can be  charged as I am going along.

This powerbank can also start my bike if I get a flat battery .

 

 

 

1033309700_PUNCTUREKIT.thumb.jpg.73873e65c803aed351667dfb015f5fb9.jpg

 

 

Puncture plug kit. Never go anywhere without it. Has CO2 cartridges as an emergency , but I also carry this.

 

 

PUMP1.thumb.jpg.a026ee6c6181f8c59f2a68baa11c259a.jpg

 

Brilliant little pump and takes up no room .

 

 

Externally I have a rack ...........and use sw motech bags as they are waterproof and so easy to put on the bike.

 

LUGGAGE.thumb.jpg.968e77b2aa383fcf0fcc0f97feaa87dd.jpg

 

 

Upfront, I have a quadlock stem mount and quadlock case and rain poncho.

 

 

655610501_QUADLOCKSTEM.thumb.jpg.b7e03668158dba1ee80c762928e7bcf2.jpg

 

 

1028126472_QUADLOCKCASE.thumb.jpg.894bcda1261368f66ed0341b9ad483c3.jpg

 

 

Other than that I carry duck tape, cable ties, 8-10-11-12-13-14 mm ratchet spanners and adjustable spanner and a set of allen keys.

 

Thats it.

 

Hope it helps, have a great trip and keep us posted how you get on .

 

Vaya con dios .................

 

and si , hablo espanol tambian, cuidado con los ladrones ya que  estan en todos los sitios.

 

 

Buena suerte.

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I like that Optimate charger. Thanks for showing it.  I just put in an order for one. 

 

For air-pumping duties, I disassembled your typical small Walmart style air pump, dumped all the plastic housing, and stuffed the pump itself into one of the side cowls under the seat.  Never used it for 8 or 9 years.  Tried it out this summer to blow up an air mattress and the pump piston had seized.  I think it was rust from humidity over the years as that area doesn't get wet from rain.  So I'll be disassembling another unit and doing the same.   (I also carry a can of the emergency tire repair stuff as well). 

 

Good thread.

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I had a Motopumps electric pump.  On its second use it grenaded in to about six pieces and scratched my rear wheel.  :dry:  On to another brand.  It's a fine balance between compact size and sufficient quality so it works when you need it. 

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This is an interesting thread for me. Because of the nature of my job I spend a lot of time overseas, on ships. When I do get back to Maine I don't spend much time riding to town or locally, I try to get some good long trips in as I can. Since no Honda dealer wants to see me pull up on my 85 VF1000R, VF1100 Sabre or even my 97 VFR, I've put together a tool kit that for the most part has stood me well over the years. Things like service manuals and other things change between bikes (Spare spark box for the first Gens) but the little black bag goes with me on every bike. Its 9"X6"X4", generally its in my tail bag, sometimes in a saddlebag, depends on the trip. The apple is there to show scale. The bag is an old camera bag.

 

In it are the following

 

1. Cheap HF voltmeter.

2. Small/Large wire ties. 

3. LED Lenser flashlight.

4. Tire pressure gauge.

5. 8,10,11,12,13,14 17mm 3/8" sockets

6. 4 X AA batteries

7. 10,12,13,14 17mm ratchet wrenches 11mm non ratchet.

8. Mini flexible led light.

9. Fuses, lots of them.

10. Wire,

11. Small snips.

12. Tire valve.

13. Tire valve tool.

14. Spare Bulbs.

15. Razor blades.

16. Mini screwdrivers.

17. regular screwdrivers.

18. Tire plug repair kit w/spares.

19. Rubber cement.

20. Nitrile gloves.

21. Long/Short 3/8" extensions

22. Wheel weights.

23. Needle nose vise grips.

24. Electrical tape.

25. JB Weld Steel Stik.

 

Next pic.

 

1. Mini 12 volt compressor, this lives on the left side of the upper fairing across from the triple trees. Its held by a small bungee. Fits on the 4th Gen and on my 3rd Gen I had in the UK. Not sure about other VFR's.

2. Clymers/Honda Service Manual, usually lives in the tail bag.

3. Leatherman tool, live in the Tank Bag for quick stuff.

4. 1/4" socket set, in the Tailbag

5. Headlamp, Tank Bag.

6. 3/8"/1/4" extendable Ratchet, HF. Lives in the tail bag.

 

Next pic.

 

1. 12 volt power outlet,  12 volt socket, 2 USB ports Voltage gauge. Mounted on to of the right upper fairing

 

Next pic.

 

1 BMW style 12 volt socket. Installed by the PO. Kept it but the adapter is a bit of a PIA. Looks good though.

 

Some thoughts.

 

1/4 of the State of Maine is uninhabited as are great swaths of the western US. Even in areas that claim to have cell phone service, well you may not. That is why I drag hard copies of Repair Manuals with me.

 

GPS. See above, have some type of maps with you for your route. I carry a small atlas, but the ones they hand out at visitors centers are probably better, take up less room and don't need a connection.

 

Money. As mentioned in this thread is a good idea. I had my credit card hacked at a gas station in Kansas on my way back to Maine on my VF1000R. My backup AMEX was not accepted by the gas station in Missouri when I discovered what happened nor by the hotel I had booked, as, well, my card I had booked it on had been cancelled by then. I did though have $100 in Emergency funds with me. It filled my tank, paid for my room and I eked out a dinner to boot. I do not keep it in my tank bag, under the seat etc. I keep it in my boots, have yet to run into anyone interested in stealing my stinky MC boots.0107211212.thumb.jpg.e8f2be4c8ae519e63f0c5d0b89a35536.jpgboots

 

 

 

 

316. 0107211146a.thumb.jpg.1052d4518eec08baaa7ffac6bbdb9250.jpg

0107211132a.jpg

0108210624a.jpg

0108210624c.jpg

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25 minutes ago, FromMaine said:

This is an interesting thread for me. Because of the nature of my job I spend a lot of time overseas, on ships. When I do get back to Maine I don't spend much time riding to town or locally, I try to get some good long trips in as I can. Since no Honda dealer wants to see me pull up on my 85 VF1000R, VF1100 Sabre or even my 97 VFR, I've put together a tool kit that for the most part has stood me well over the years. Things like service manuals and other things change between bikes (Spare spark box for the first Gens) but the little black bag goes with me on every bike. Its 9"X6"X4", generally its in my tail bag, sometimes in a saddlebag, depends on the trip. The apple is there to show scale.

 

In it are the following

 

1. Cheap HF voltmeter.

2. Small/Large wire ties. 

3. LED Lenser flashlight.

4. Tire pressure gauge.

5. 8,10,11,12,13,14 17mm 3/8" sockets

6. 4 X AA batteries

7. 10,12,13,14 17mm ratchet wrenches 11mm non ratchet.

8. Mini flexible led light.

9. Fuses, lots of them.

10. Wire,

11. Small snips.

12. Tire valve.

13. Tire valve tool.

14. Spare Bulbs.

15. Razor blades.

16. Mini screwdrivers.

17. regular screwdrivers.

18. Tire plug repair kit w/spares.

19. Rubber cement.

20. Nitrile gloves.

21. Long/Short 3/8" extensions

22. Wheel weights.

23. Needle nose vise grips.

24. Electrical tape.

25. JB Weld Steel Stik.

 

Next pic.

 

1. Mini 12 volt compressor, this lives on the left side of the upper fairing across from the triple trees. Its held by a small bungee. Fits on the 4th Gen and on my 3rd Gen I had in the UK. Not sure about other VFR's.

2. Clymers/Honda Service Manual, usually lives in the tail bag.

3. Leatherman tool, live in the Tank Bag for quick stuff.

4. 1/4" socket set, in the Tailbag

5. Headlamp, Tank Bag.

6. 3/8"/1/4" extendable Ratchet, HF. Lives in the tail bag.

 

Next pic.

 

1. 12 volt power outlet,  12 volt socket, 2 USB ports Voltage gauge. Mounted on to of the right upper fairing

 

Next pic.

 

1 BMW style 12 volt socket. Installed by the PO. Kept it but the adapter is a bit of a PIA. Looks good though.

 

Some thoughts.

 

1/4 of the State of Maine is uninhabited as are great swaths of the western US. Even in areas that claim to have cell phone service, well you may not. That is why I drag hard copies of Repair Manuals with me.

 

GPS. See above, have some type of maps with you for your route. I carry a small atlas, but the ones they hand out at visitors centers are probably better, take up less room and don't need a connection.

 

Money. As mentioned in this thread is a good idea. I had my credit card hacked at a gas station in Kansas on my way back to Maine on my VF1000R. My backup AMEX was not accepted by the gas station in Missouri when I discovered what happened nor by the hotel I had booked, as, well, my card I had booked it on had been cancelled by then. I did though have $100 in Emergency funds with me. It filled my tank, paid for my room and I eked out a dinner to boot. I do not keep it in my tank bag, under the seat etc. I keep it in my boots, have yet to run into anyone interested in stealing my stinky MC boots.0107211212.thumb.jpg.e8f2be4c8ae519e63f0c5d0b89a35536.jpgboots

 

 

 

 

316. 0107211146a.thumb.jpg.1052d4518eec08baaa7ffac6bbdb9250.jpg

0107211132a.jpg

0108210624a.jpg

0108210624c.jpg

how long does it take to do a valve adjustment with that set of tools? 🙂

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36 minutes ago, Fritzer said:

how long does it take to do a valve adjustment with that set of tools? 🙂

 

My 4th gen's clearance were checked for the first time at 90,000km so no worries... :goofy:

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17 hours ago, Fritzer said:

how long does it take to do a valve adjustment with that set of tools? 🙂

Ummmmmmm.............................🙂

 

Forever, I keep forgetting the feeler gauges.

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Thanks for the kind words, I assume its the Black switch attached to the left bar riser. Its for my fan switch, I don't have a problem with cooling here in New England, but when I head south and the ambient temp, starts to get close to 100F/38C I'll use it when stuck in traffic. No filtering here outside of Calf. 

 

The switch on the left is for my driving lights, its a lighted switch clumsily mounted on a scrap of aluminum I had hanging around. I should make it nicer looking, but haven't. It plays well to the Red neck crowd.🍻.

 

The pic below is of the PO's installation of a heated grips switch. I think it looks good and is a good use of space, also its easy to use, except I always forget to use it as its my only bike with heated grips.

 

 

0111211620 (1).jpg

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16 hours ago, FromMaine said:

Thanks for the kind words, I assume its the Black switch attached to the left bar riser. Its for my fan switch, I don't have a problem with cooling here in New England, but when I head south and the ambient temp, starts to get close to 100F/38C I'll use it when stuck in traffic. No filtering here outside of Calf. 

 

The switch on the left is for my driving lights, its a lighted switch clumsily mounted on a scrap of aluminum I had hanging around. I should make it nicer looking, but haven't. It plays well to the Red neck crowd.🍻.

 

The pic below is of the PO's installation of a heated grips switch. I think it looks good and is a good use of space, also its easy to use, except I always forget to use it as its my only bike with heated grips.

 

 

0111211620 (1).jpg

 

Yes I was referring to the black switch mounted on the lhs bar riser.

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On 1/9/2021 at 11:12 AM, FromMaine said:

This is an interesting thread for me. Because of the nature of my job I spend a lot of time overseas, on ships. When I do get back to Maine I don't spend much time riding to town or locally, I try to get some good long trips in as I can. Since no Honda dealer wants to see me pull up on my 85 VF1000R, VF1100 Sabre or even my 97 VFR, I've put together a tool kit that for the most part has stood me well over the years. Things like service manuals and other things change between bikes (Spare spark box for the first Gens) but the little black bag goes with me on every bike. Its 9"X6"X4", generally its in my tail bag, sometimes in a saddlebag, depends on the trip. The apple is there to show scale. The bag is an old camera bag.

 

Not only is what you bring impressive, it all fits into that little camera bag! But you forgot to mention what you take with you on every ride: the skill, knowledge and experience to use those tools when problems arise. I have far less of that type of stuff to bring along!

 

But my multi-day trips are alone more often than not, and I of course search out those desolate places that lack cell service. My tank bag always has a battery-powered air compressor and a tire repair kit (Dynaplug), tire pressure gauge etc. On overnight trips I always bring a Weego--compact Li battery which can charge a dead battery and my phone, has a flashlight, etc. Light and powerful, Weegos are great!

 

I am also a map Luddite. I love DeLorme maps (from Yarmouth!), but they are bulky, esp CA. But if I'm headed on a longer trip to somewhere new I can usually find room in the top trunk. I wired a Garmin to my bike, and gps is really useful for certain things, it's just that they are--to me anyway--claustrophobic.

 

I've considered a satellite comm device like the In Reach from Garmin for emergencies, but they require a subscription, haven't pulled the trigger yet.

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39 minutes ago, St. Stephen said:

Not only is what you bring impressive, it all fits into that little camera bag! But you forgot to mention what you take with you on every ride: the skill, knowledge and experience to use those tools when problems arise. I have far less of that type of stuff to bring along!

 

But my multi-day trips are alone more often than not, and I of course search out those desolate places that lack cell service. My tank bag always has a battery-powered air compressor and a tire repair kit (Dynaplug), tire pressure gauge etc. On overnight trips I always bring a Weego--compact Li battery which can charge a dead battery and my phone, has a flashlight, etc. Light and powerful, Weegos are great!

 

I am also a map Luddite. I love DeLorme maps (from Yarmouth!), but they are bulky, esp CA. But if I'm headed on a longer trip to somewhere new I can usually find room in the top trunk. I wired a Garmin to my bike, and gps is really useful for certain things, it's just that they are--to me anyway--claustrophobic.

 

I've considered a satellite comm device like the In Reach from Garmin for emergencies, but they require a subscription, haven't pulled the trigger yet.

Thanks for the kind words. There's an old saying "Experience is a harsh teacher, she gives the test first, the lesson after". Years of experience generally mean years of having to figure out how to get up and running again.

 

I Have worked on boats and ships for over 40 years now, all Blue water crossing oceans, so no radioing for a tow to port. In fact on a trip from New Zealand around Cape Horn and on to West Africa, at one point the nearest land was Antarctica. Which one of the engineers pointed out probably did not have many places to pull in for "some microwave popcorn and a spare injector for the Caterpillar" In short I've learned to have with me the things I need to fix boats and motorcycles in remote places. Some of my friends rib me about it when I go digging into my tools, some who don't know me laugh, but I doubt they ever pick up their phone to find no service or live more than a few miles from a number of parts stores. Fair enough I guess.

 

Not sure if you know, but DeLorme is now owned by Garmin, which is great. They started out making a single Atlas of every road in Maine, so the were a small niche company. They branched out to publish other Atlases and built their Maparium in Falmouth, then lots of people stopped using maps and started using GPS and their phones. So its good to see they were bought by a big company who can allow them to continue doing what the do well.

 

Had a look online at Weego, very impressive. I've seen a few similar products personally but not that one. Once the budget allows I'll pick one up as its obviously easy to move between bikes.

 

The Garmin Reach I was surprised to find out is using Motorola's Iridium satellites, something I'm very familiar with as we used the old Motorola phones offshore in the nineties for calls we could not make by Single Sideband Radio. They were heart stoppingly expensive for both phone and calls, but they mostly worked even 3,000 miles from land.

 

Seriously thinking about some type of GPS tracker soon for the bike(s) at some point, just to many big open spaces in Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick in my back yard.

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This is an excellent thread, some great ideas for tools, and puncture repair kitting for your bike.

 

My own 2cents worth, your best weapon for anything going wrong is a very well maintained bike. Having done many group rides with the Ulysses Club every bike that has caused troubles has been the not so well cared for ones, apart from the unavoidable puncture. Really good bike care and maintenance is your best insurance against the unexpected. That said, always be well kitted up for a puncture.

Cheers.:fing02:

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10 hours ago, Grum said:

This is an excellent thread, some great ideas for tools, and puncture repair kitting for your bike.

 

My own 2cents worth, your best weapon for anything going wrong is a very well maintained bike. Having done many group rides with the Ulysses Club every bike that has caused troubles has been the not so well cared for ones, apart from the unavoidable puncture. Really good bike care and maintenance is your best insurance against the unexpected. That said, always be well kitted up for a puncture.

Cheers.:fing02:

I used to do "Fly and Rides"...fly to a location, rent a bike...(don't seem to be able to do that anymore.).  Quite a while back, flew into San Francisco, rented a brand spanking new 5th gen .......3000 miles, loop up Hwy 1, into Oregon, lots of wandering. ....Into Yosemite...... Glacier Point.....what? Yep ...rear flat tire... (wow) a bit of adventure....

(Park Rangers are awesome)

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From Maine: "Years of experience generally mean years of having to figure out how to get up and running again." and "Some who don't know me laugh"

 

From Grum: "That said, always be well kitted up for a puncture..."

 

 

 

My Input...have some eggs handy too, for a different kind of puncture........😲

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On 1/14/2021 at 1:57 PM, RC1237V said:

My Input...have some eggs handy too, for a different kind of puncture........😲

Ha haaa I thought you may have been referring to a coolant puncture!

How long did it take to clear the scrambled or poached eggs from the cooling system?

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The egg just looks like egg drop soup. It does not coagulate until it tries to exit the hole, and then it hardens up instantly. I tried a bottle of stop leak, but the hole was so big it just all came back out. When I bought the eggs, everyone laughed at me. And as I revved it up the water kept shooting out to my dismay, and others' humor. Then it stopped and the crowd went silent. I had to cut the three day ride short, but made it home on less than a dollar worth of eggs...

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47 minutes ago, RC1237V said:

The egg just looks like egg drop soup. It does not coagulate until it tries to exit the hole, and then it hardens up instantly. I tried a bottle of stop leak, but the hole was so big it just all came back out. When I bought the eggs, everyone laughed at me. And as I revved it up the water kept shooting out to my dismay, and others' humor. Then it stopped and the crowd went silent. I had to cut the three day ride short, but made it home on less than a dollar worth of eggs...

 

I'll have to remember that one in a desperate emergency situation. Nice to add a healthy diet of eggs to the V4 rather than just boring oil, fuel and coolant! :wacko: Just won't be keeping a couple of them under my seat!

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46 minutes ago, RC1237V said:

Those guys still rib me about it....

 

Gosh, my memory is that we were deeply concerned.  😉 

 

Not sure anyone had seen that solution before!

 

IMG_1328.JPG

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