Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
adkfinn

adkfinn's 5th gen 20yr refresh

Recommended Posts

48 minutes ago, kentguy55 said:

Yes it is the two hoses that connect to the side of the air filter housing so this is the right hand one on the left hand side that has this t-connector in it. i have added a video if that helps and thanks for the quick reply.

 

00002.MTS

 

That is def the TB tube for #2 cylinder, and you are right these should be hooked up to the airbox. The factory manual has an image of this in the Starter Valve Sync section on page 5-85. I need to doulble check that I have these reinstalled correctly on my bike, so thanks for that. I still don't see any mention or indication of a T junction on this hose in the manual, nor was there one my bike, so I can't help with that little mystery... perhaps if you post up the question as a stand alone topic another member will have more info. Good luck! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, kentguy55 said:

Yes it is the two hoses that connect to the side of the air filter housing so this is the right hand one on the left hand side that has this t-connector in it. i have added a video if that helps and thanks for the quick reply.

 

00002.MTS

Kentguy, 

 

I thought of something that might be worth mentioning - Does your bike have a Scottoiler or other auto oiler that uses a vacuum line to control oil feed? I don't have first hand experience with these, but understand that you 'T' them into an existing vacuum line on the bike. Could that be what yours runs to? Is the other end of the additional line hooked up to anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok have realised that was something that was put in to feed a scotoiler.

So the collection of hoses that have all the t-pieces in what on the air filter housing does that connect to please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks fantastic.

Love your work.


Will need to take some of this as advise and give mine a good clean.

Looks great on the outside but I'm sure its filthy on the inside haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Headhunter said:

Damn that looks good.  

Thanks for the kind words. I am impatiently waiting for the long New England winter pass so I can get her back out on the road. I do have a few little projects planned for this year... 

 

20190210_164223.jpg?dl=0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that Jamie's new product?

 

I got one of his last 929 shock conversions and it's a revelation. Not just because having a properly spring shock is important for a fat man, it was also damned close to right on setup, too. He does good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, MooseMoose said:

Is that Jamie's new product?

 

I got one of his last 929 shock conversions and it's a revelation. Not just because having a properly spring shock is important for a fat man, it was also damned close to right on setup, too. He does good stuff.

 

Yes, that is one of Jamie's new BD40 rear shocks that he is building in-house. I hear you on the fat man comment, I am looking forward to having this bike set up properly for my weight. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I think these are sprung stock for folks like a 145lb  Japanese man.

 

That remote reservoir looks nice. Easy to fit and adjust. Glad to see someone can get one, even if they're not listed on his site yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, MooseMoose said:

Yeah, I think these are sprung stock for folks like a 145lb  Japanese man.

 

That remote reservoir looks nice. Easy to fit and adjust. Glad to see someone can get one, even if they're not listed on his site yet.

 

Moose - the shock reeks of quality materials and craftsmanship. It is a really nice piece, well made and very substantial. I expect it will perform as good as it looks, I've yet to find any criticism of DMr, only accolades for the work he does. Admittedly, Jamie's site is still a bit out of date, but he is very communicative via email. I was on the email list of interested parties and he sent out a launch email before the holidays with a bit of a discount, which is when I pulled the trigger. I sprang for the fork cartridge kit as well. I am really looking forward to getting a leg over these new parts, I am hoping it is transformative.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He rebuilt my forks last year. The cartridge kit actually has more adjustability, but I have very few issues with my front end. It's like the bike just sort of squats, then stays there, when you brake, and it provides a lot of feedback I didn't get from the stock + racetech springs setup that was on the bike when I bought it.

 

You're going to be stoked at the improvement.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2019 at 1:36 PM, MooseMoose said:

Yeah, I think these are sprung stock for folks like a 145lb  Japanese man.

 

Just not the seat height of the average Japanese male...😄

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2019 at 2:01 PM, adkfinn said:

 

Moose - the shock reeks of quality materials and craftsmanship. It is a really nice piece, well made and very substantial. I expect it will perform as good as it looks, I've yet to find any criticism of DMr, only accolades for the work he does. Admittedly, Jamie's site is still a bit out of date, but he is very communicative via email. I was on the email list of interested parties and he sent out a launch email before the holidays with a bit of a discount, which is when I pulled the trigger. I sprang for the fork cartridge kit as well. I am really looking forward to getting a leg over these new parts, I am hoping it is transformative.  

The folks that buy his stuff really like it. The folks that buy other stuff are looking for a fancy brand name. (You know who you are...😉)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a really slow start this year, just like the weather in Vermont. Just to give you an idea about how far behind we have been: Ice fishing lasted into the third week of April this year, ice-out on a lot of ponds was the end of the first week of May, and we got over 2" of snow on May 14th.

Now that things have finally warmed up I've begun riding and working on the bike. I ended up spending some time on my CB750F in order to make sure it was in good running order before I began tearing down the VFR again. The F ended up needing a new regulator/rectifier and I had to replace the terminals & plug between it and stator. Everything else tested fine (yes, Honda had charging system issues in the early 80's as well... it seems to be a pattern). 

 

On to the VFR - suspension work is in progress, pics to follow. I've also fitted the late 5th Gen EMGO mirrors and a few bits from Pro-Bolt. I wish I had gotten in on the first round of the new US header, my work on the factory header was wasted, it looks like trash already. I'll get some pics tonight and get them up soon. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just Wow! Your machine must be better than right off the assembly line. Seems perfect in every way.

This thread is a road map for creating the perfect VFR. Best gen in the fastest color.

Congratulations.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2018 at 8:54 AM, adkfinn said:

Parts/refurb:

 

Once I had things stripped down the next step was cleaning. Borrowing heavily from GreginDenver's thread, I grabbed a bunch of different plastic bristled brushes, a few steel and copper wire brushes, and some cans of foaming de-greaser. I opted for some CRC brand heavy duty foaming degreaser, aviation Simple Green mix in a spray bottle, and brake cleaner and carb cleaner. After I stripped the cooling system and exposed the engine valley I started by dry brushing and vacuuming the area, this will save a lot of mess and allow you use much less liquid cleaners later. After dry brushing and vacuuming I used the de-greaser and brushes to go after the remaining filth. Where things were really stuck on or stained I used the wire brushes to really get after it. 

 

engine valley cleaned (not perfect but as good as it was going to get with my tools and time available):

20180520_131700.jpg?dl=0

 

This is why you should really check and replace the water joint o rings (two on top and two on the left side) while you are in here: 

20180520_132607.jpg?dl=0

 

Gross.  Believe it or not, these o rings were not showing any exterior signs of failing when they were mounted. After a bit of cleaning with new o rings installed, ready for replacement:

20180520_154550.jpg?dl=0

 

I suspected my Tstat was frozen open based on the fact that the bike was running cool while riding. This was confirmed when I pulled the housing and could see the the Tstat was frozen open at least 1/4". As mentioned in my 'to-do' list, I figured I would replace all the cooling hoses as well given their age and the fact that the prospect of needing to tear the bike down again any the near future seemed wholly unappealing. After a bit of research I decided to try the AS3 silicone hose kit. This kit is complete for 98-99 5th gens ( it may be missing the wax unit hoses for the 00-01) and the price is very reasonable for what appear to be high quality parts. Some progress pics of the AS3 hose kit and stainless steel clamps going on the now cleaned up engine, new Tstat installed, housing cleaned up:

20180524_211338.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230300.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230242.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230231.jpg?dl=0

 

I would say the fit and design of the AS3 hoses was good. Like others, I did trim around an 1/8" in a couple of places to shorten them up a bit, but I wouldn't call that an issue really. I haven't filled and tested the system so I can't comment on leaks, etc. just yet. In the engine valley pic above you can just see the PAIR block-off plates installed. Much thanks to Mello Dude for making and selling this kit! The parts are well made and and his instructions are spot on. I couldn't resist a bit of polishing prior to install:

20180520_131803.jpg?dl=0

 

 

Hi

 

On 5/29/2018 at 10:08 AM, adkfinn said:

I posted some pics of the exhaust header above, but here it is again. I soaked the header nuts in Kroil routinely for at least a week prior to removing the headers. They all came loose without drama, save one where the stud unscrewed from the block.

20180507_181051.jpg?dl=0

 

Looking pretty crappy if you ask me. I have been following the various exhaust threads and my thoughts are the following: I would happily replace the factory header with a stainless steel performance header, given the cost was not intolerable. I am not interested in the current 'off the shelf' replacements that are available, why give up performance if you don't have to? My header is looking neglected and a bit rusty, but it is structurally sound performs as it should. At this point I considered having it professionally blasted and ceramic coated. The best quote I received locally was $250 for blasting/prep, Cerakote Glacier Chrome, and polishing. In the end I decided to blast and paint them myself. It can be done for negligible cost, will correct the rusting issue, and it will save me a bunch of money. Also, if/when a performance header actually becomes available I will feel less conflicted about purchasing it than if I had recently invested significant funds in my factory header. So, I media blasted (thanks to my neighbor for having a stocked garage and letting me use his tools) and prepped, then primed, painted and clear coated my factory headers with VHT Flame Proof products. I've used this line in the past and had acceptable results with poorer prep. I did post another thread about this, but I am repeating it here for the sake of completeness. My paint setup is crap/open air, but my goal is good coverage and rust prevention, not a show quality finish. They turned out well enough for me:

20180520_113141.jpg?dl=0

 

20180520_113148.jpg?dl=0

 

And here is a teaser of my new end can:

20180330_192843.jpg?dl=0

 

On 5/29/2018 at 8:54 AM, adkfinn said:

Parts/refurb:

 

Once I had things stripped down the next step was cleaning. Borrowing heavily from GreginDenver's thread, I grabbed a bunch of different plastic bristled brushes, a few steel and copper wire brushes, and some cans of foaming de-greaser. I opted for some CRC brand heavy duty foaming degreaser, aviation Simple Green mix in a spray bottle, and brake cleaner and carb cleaner. After I stripped the cooling system and exposed the engine valley I started by dry brushing and vacuuming the area, this will save a lot of mess and allow you use much less liquid cleaners later. After dry brushing and vacuuming I used the de-greaser and brushes to go after the remaining filth. Where things were really stuck on or stained I used the wire brushes to really get after it. 

 

engine valley cleaned (not perfect but as good as it was going to get with my tools and time available):

20180520_131700.jpg?dl=0

 

This is why you should really check and replace the water joint o rings (two on top and two on the left side) while you are in here: 

20180520_132607.jpg?dl=0

 

Gross.  Believe it or not, these o rings were not showing any exterior signs of failing when they were mounted. After a bit of cleaning with new o rings installed, ready for replacement:

20180520_154550.jpg?dl=0

 

I suspected my Tstat was frozen open based on the fact that the bike was running cool while riding. This was confirmed when I pulled the housing and could see the the Tstat was frozen open at least 1/4". As mentioned in my 'to-do' list, I figured I would replace all the cooling hoses as well given their age and the fact that the prospect of needing to tear the bike down again any the near future seemed wholly unappealing. After a bit of research I decided to try the AS3 silicone hose kit. This kit is complete for 98-99 5th gens ( it may be missing the wax unit hoses for the 00-01) and the price is very reasonable for what appear to be high quality parts. Some progress pics of the AS3 hose kit and stainless steel clamps going on the now cleaned up engine, new Tstat installed, housing cleaned up:

20180524_211338.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230300.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230242.jpg?dl=0

 

20180524_230231.jpg?dl=0

 

I would say the fit and design of the AS3 hoses was good. Like others, I did trim around an 1/8" in a couple of places to shorten them up a bit, but I wouldn't call that an issue really. I haven't filled and tested the system so I can't comment on leaks, etc. just yet. In the engine valley pic above you can just see the PAIR block-off plates installed. Much thanks to Mello Dude for making and selling this kit! The parts are well made and and his instructions are spot on. I couldn't resist a bit of polishing prior to install:

20180520_131803.jpg?dl=0

 

 

Hi adkfinn,   Nice thread. thanks for posting all this. Could you possibly post a link to GreginDenvers thread on polishing up the aluminum parts? I searched, but could not find it. Thanks. Ross

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, RossR said:

Hi

 

 

Hi adkfinn,   Nice thread. thanks for posting all this. Could you possibly post a link to GreginDenvers thread on polishing up the aluminum parts? I searched, but could not find it. Thanks. Ross

Sure thing! It is actually stickied in the 5th Gen forum on VFRW: https://vfrworld.com/threads/refurbishing-my-99-5th-gen.52488/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2019 updates (fun stuff first):

 

I replaced the 'condom' mirrors with some late 5th Gen EMGO replacements: 

20190620_173335.jpg?dl=0

 

Forgive the mess. I know this doesn't cover any new ground - but I found that either between the different mirror or the positioning I have a lot more rearward visibility. I snagged them on Amazon for cheap with prime shipping. I wish the mirror bodies were smooth like the early 5th gen mirrors, but it is still an improvement overall. I needed to order different mounting bolts since the heads of the factory bolts for my '98 were too wide to fit in the recess  on these mirrors. Who doesn't like to do a little shopping at Pro-Bolt? Not me. 

 

20190620_173328.jpg?dl=0

 

Sorry for some pics not being in great focus. I try to snap pics quickly and don't really take the time to review each one to ensure it is perfectly crisp. This is wrenching after dinner on week nights, there's no time for that, I'd never get anything done. While I was scouring Pro-Bolt I decided I'd replace my gas tank lid bolts since a few were starting to get rusty/crusty:

 

20190620_173318.jpg?dl=0

 

All better. 🙂

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On to the not so fun stuff:

 

If you've read this thread you know that last spring I pulled the exhaust, sandblasted the entire thing myself. I spent hours... I was thorough and the pipes came out clean and very evenly 'scuffed' which should've helped ensure adhesion. I cleaned them after with air and multiple acetone wipes. Afterwards I used the full boat of VHT Flameproof products - primer, paint, clear. I don't have a paint booth so it was done open air, but I was careful about temps and humidity. After multiple coats of primer, paint, clear they looked pretty good. You've seen this pic before:

 

20180520_113141.jpg?dl=0

 

After installing them I performed the 'on the bike' cure as per their specs: https://www.vhtpaint.com/high-heat/vht-flameproof-coating (bottom on page). Well my friends, I don't know what went wrong but here they are a year later:

 

20190620_173208.jpg?dl=0

 

20190620_173158.jpg?dl=0

 

 

FAIL. I am disappointed that the considerable time spent was essentially wasted. I honestly don't know if it was something I did or if this is really just a poor product... Either way I am waiting to put down a deposit on set of Wade's stainless steel performance headers. This just won't do. I am an amateur for sure, but I have prepped and painted bumpers for my jeeps, ground and painted the frame of my 4Runner, etc. in the past with good success. I had used VHT Flameproof on the header of my CB750F a few years earlier and it didn't hold up very well, but I knew my prep work was lacking in that case, and the area that failed is the downtubes that get sandblasted by the tire while you ride.

Based on this experience I can say with conviction that I won't be using this product any time in the future. If anyone has used it with success I'd like to hear it, or if you think you know where I went wrong, please chime in as I would love to learn from my mistake(s). 

 

Here's some of what is left of the paint that was still on these headers:

 

20190620_173251.jpg?dl=0

 

20190620_173150.jpg?dl=0

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other fun item - the PCIII that I picked up used last year is now programmed (with one of Hispanic Slammer's Staintune files from this site until I find a place to give it a custom tune) and installed. For anyone else running one on a 5th Gen, did you find that the cable is just a tad short for easy, clean mounting? This is about as far back I can get mine with the cables run and ziptied along the main harness inside the frame:

 

20190620_173304.jpg?dl=0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I found the same issue with the cable for the PC. Where you have yours is where mine ended up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the paint of the exhaust. I have had a similar experience with a whole range of bbq/vht/exhaust paints. None of them work very well. I just accept it will a never ending task of regular maintenance. Stainless is the way to go IMO.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to SS on the exhaust or have it thermal coated, paint is useless on high temp variation parts, and it can’t expand & contract sufficiently without cracking.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input. I am hoping there ends up being a second run of 5th Gen headers from Wade. If not I'll probably end up giving the lextek set a go. 

 

Initial thoughts on the PCIII and 'Staintune' file from this site - The bike seems be running a bit leaner than stock based on odor, engine temps, etc. My buttdyno says that it feels a bit less snatchy at lower revs and a bit more grunt from the mid rev range up. Placebo? perhaps. I am looking forward to getting the bike on the dyno and in the hands of a real tuner. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.