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The Official Oil Thread


HispanicSlammer
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What Kind Of Oil Do You Use?  

1226 members have voted

  1. 1. Oil Type?

    • Synthetic
      826
    • Dino/Organic
      233
    • Blend
      169
  2. 2. Motorcycle or Generic oil?

    • Motorcycle Specific
      723
    • Major Brands
      457
    • Generic Automotive
      81
  3. 3. Which Brand?

    • Honda Branded
      186
    • Mobile One
      322
    • AMSOil
      109
    • Castrol
      110
    • Penzoil
      11
    • Lucus
      2
    • Havoline
      1
    • Quaker State
      4
    • Motul
      104
    • Valvoline
      33
    • Golden Spectro
      16
    • Rotella
      205
    • Other
      125


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  • Member Contributer

Back in May I went on a 6 day trip and filled the vfr up with Rotella T6 for the first time without even putting test miles on the engine with it. Went through 5 states with varying temps and lots of gear shifting. Didn't use a drop of it. I was able to snatch up 8 jugs of it @ $14.99 a pop. That's a lot better than paying $26 retail. I plan on sending off the old oil for testing.

Did you ever send oil for testing? I've been running Rotella T6 Synthetic since I bought my 04 last year with 24k miles. I now have 41k miles and still loving the Rotella T6...smooth shifts etc. I realize there are probably better oils to use, but I will probably trade this bike before wear becomes an issue for me. Also, where did you get that $14.99 price for 8 qts??? I'm buying by the gallon for about $24 I think.

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I broke my New vfr in on Rotella 5w40 syn. after about 7 oil changes, and about 8,000 miles total, I sent it to be tested. The weight had degrade to a 30 weight in 1100 miles. The wear metals were right around idea time to change, but I like atleast 2500 mile on the changes, so I beefed up the oil.

End results, Rotella 5w40 in a Motorcycle, is about like a 10w40 car oil

The next testing sent in, was Amsoil 15w40, with 2000 mile on the oil.

Identical wear numbers on the oil as Rotella, but it also had double the milege

Edited by spud786
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  • 1 month later...
  • Member Contributer

Lubro-Moly, German syn oil . The only high mileage oil approved for extended service in Mercedes,BMW,Audi and Porcha(sic).

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Guest twoeyedbob

Ive run mine on vauxhall semi synth for 13yrs (changed every 3-4 k)

Its now at 90,000 miles (750fv)

Had the valves done a few weeks back and the mechanic said

He couldnt see any wear at all on the top end

Could have been 2000 miles if he didnt know better.

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  • Member Contributer

Looked up "Vauxhall" since it seemed like some exotic German brand, but I guess it's really just GM in Euro-speak. Regardless, 90k miles with a good mechanical report is good anecdotal evidence for synthetics...

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  • Member Contributer

Vauxhall is the UK names for cars that are called Opel in Gernany. Both part of GM (like Holden in Oz)

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I heard somewhere they were going to bring back the Opel in the U.S. We've also seen a resurgence of Fiat being sold through Chrysler dealerships...

Sorry for getting off topic...

I'm continuing to use Rotella T6 full synth, changing the filter everytime with a WalMart Supertech filter that have been shown to be high quality like the Purolator Pure One, and Mobil 1 filters.

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  • Member Contributer

End results, Rotella 5w40 in a Motorcycle, is about like a 10w40 car oil

Negative... for a 40wt its flows less during critical start up than Shell's own Helix 40wt...

Shell Helix 40wt is the same thickness as Rotella 40wt but Helix is just refined

higher to flow more... which is a premium quality in your choice of 40wt

oils... again flow is what lubricates our engines not pressure... if you wish

to stay with Rotella family look to Shells Rotella 10W 30 as a better choice...

Quote Shell Rotella T 5W40 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 95

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 15

Quote Shell Helix 5W 40 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 76

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 13.8

Quote Shell Rotella T 10W30 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 83

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 12.1

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  • Member Contributer

One) At the risk of repetition, I was taught that viscosity is the resistance to flow. Higher numbers: more resistance to flow. That made it easier for me to understand the basics.

Two) What is the logic against using OEM oil filters and Honda motorcycle oil? Seems like a no-brainer.

Three) I have a new consideration afterpurchasing Lobsters Y2K. Full sync has been used; he suggested that that means I should continue to use same. Any opinions on that?

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  • Member Contributer

One) At the risk of repetition, I was taught that viscosity is the resistance to flow. Higher numbers: more resistance to flow. That made it easier for me to understand the basics.

Two) What is the logic against using OEM oil filters and Honda motorcycle oil? Seems like a no-brainer.

Three) I have a new consideration afterpurchasing Lobsters Y2K. Full sync has been used; he suggested that that means I should continue to use same. Any opinions on that?

How many miles do you put on your main ride per year? If I ride 9-10k miles per year and do three oil/filter changes I can either spend about $165 for the Honda products or about $78 for the Rotella/Supertech filter combo. I know it's not a ton of money, but it all ads up (tires, farkles, etc), and I don't think for my level of sophistication that it's going to make a discernible difference in the grand scheme of things. My life is full of lots of stuff besides by bike and everything vies for the almighty buck. So for me, it is something I devote some brain time to...

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One) At the risk of repetition, I was taught that viscosity is the resistance to flow. Higher numbers: more resistance to flow. That made it easier for me to understand the basics.

Two) What is the logic against using OEM oil filters and Honda motorcycle oil? Seems like a no-brainer.

Three) I have a new consideration afterpurchasing Lobsters Y2K. Full sync has been used; he suggested that that means I should continue to use same. Any opinions on that?

On the subject of using Honda branded oil & filters! It's a Waste of money for an inferior product!

If you read any oil or filter test you will find the Honda branded products fair no better than Avg and usually towards the lower end vs current quality oils like Mobil 1, Rotella & Amzoil on the Syn end and still many dino oils perform better than Honda brand oil!

Many oil filters use superior filtration medium than Honda branded filters and even WalMarts line of filters is rated a much higher quality than Honda filters.

But hey, many people pay the much higher prices for the inferior but Honda branded product! :ph34r:

BTW people who change syn oil every 3k miles are just plain crazy if you ask me. Hell HONDA suggests you change their Crappy dino oil every 8k miles and unless every mile is spent on the race track why would someone think that superior quality Syn oil won't last as long as Honda recommended dino oil! :ohmy: Other than the Oil Industries excellent ad campaign telling us to change out oil every 3k! :tongue:

The ONLY way to know if your oil is good or bad is to have it analyzed by a lab. Mobil 1 or other quality syn might be good for 8, 10, 12 , 15k miles but you'll never know w/o a lab test. :tour:

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  • Member Contributer

BLS, does Shell sell Helix in the US as a motorcycle oil? Here Helix is for cars & Advance is for bikes.

I don't know... I mentioned Helix because it was the first 5W40 Shell oil I could find to compare with Shell's 5W40 Rotella...

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  • Member Contributer

I see the comment regarding different oils providing "smooth" or "smoother shifting". I noticed the same thing only once, long ago using Motul on a 91 VX800 but have not seen the phenomena since. Does anyone have know why different oils could cause smoother shifting? I does not seem viscosity related but it seems to be brand specific.

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  • Member Contributer

2thdr, baileyrock: Thanks for the enlightenment. I was naive about Honda quality. And I could always find a use for the money saved.

If our paths cross (Tmac, SumSum) I'd be happy to buy you both a beer (coffee/whiskey/milk whatever) with the $ I'll save next year. I'm not famous for my memory so if I forget (not likely) feel free to remind me.

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I see the comment regarding different oils providing "smooth" or "smoother shifting". I noticed the same thing only once, long ago using Motul on a 91 VX800 but have not seen the phenomena since. Does anyone have know why different oils could cause smoother shifting? I does not seem viscosity related but it seems to be brand specific.

There can be a 5% difference in shift feel amongst oils, the less Grip an oil has on the clutch, the Slicker the tranny will shift.

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2thdr, baileyrock: Thanks for the enlightenment. I was naive about Honda quality. And I could always find a use for the money saved.

If our paths cross (Tmac, SumSum) I'd be happy to buy you both a beer (coffee/whiskey/milk whatever) with the $ I'll save next year. I'm not famous for my memory so if I forget (not likely) feel free to remind me.

Thanks, but we VFRD and it's members exist to help each other out. :smile:

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  • Member Contributer

I see the comment regarding different oils providing "smooth" or "smoother shifting". I noticed the same thing only once, long ago using Motul on a 91 VX800 but have not seen the phenomena since. Does anyone have know why different oils could cause smoother shifting? I does not seem viscosity related but it seems to be brand specific.

After 25 years dealing with customers I think its not a question of

oil so much as a question of technique and clutch...

RC30 and RC45 owners will ask for the same slick shifting oil that

made their friend's RC30 and RC45 shift so smoothly after it left the

Busy Little Shop... I hate to break it to them but it wasn't the oil

that made the difference it was rider technique and the elimination of

clutch drag... so before I will dump one slick shifting oil for the

next slick shifting oil I work with them on their technique and their

clutch... then and only then will they understand that they were

fooled into thinking it was the oil when in fact it was technique and

clutch...

I think we are after the same thing... smooth shift without upsetting

the suspension... the secret is moving the foot quicker than clutch or

throttle... go easy with the clutch and throttle but move your foot

quicker... but worry there is no such thing as too quick... its the

first step of seemless shifting in MotoGp...

Here are the steps how to check your clutch for drag... your gears

can't shift smoothly if your clutch is part way engaged...

1 Place your bike on the center stand...

2 Start engine and establish a steady idle...

3 Squeeze in the clutch and hold... shift into first gear...

4 Now look at the rear wheel... if it's spinning step on the rear brake...

does this action drag down the engine rpms???

If you bike is equipped with an cable then adjust the clutch lever

knob clock wise (out) 1/4 turn and check again check for clutch

drag... if you bike is equipped with hydraulics bleed system and check

for bubbles...

Ultimately you want the rear wheel to stop spinning when the engine is

idling and first gear selected with the clutch lever is squeezed in...

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  • Member Contributer

There can be a 5% difference in shift feel amongst oils, the less Grip an oil has on the clutch, the Slicker the tranny will shift.

How did you determine that one oil has a 5% shift feel versus other oils???

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  • Forum CEO

I see the comment regarding different oils providing "smooth" or "smoother shifting". I noticed the same thing only once, long ago using Motul on a 91 VX800 but have not seen the phenomena since. Does anyone have know why different oils could cause smoother shifting? I does not seem viscosity related but it seems to be brand specific.

After 25 years dealing with customers I think its not a question of

oil so much as a question of technique and clutch...

RC30 and RC45 owners will ask for the same slick shifting oil that

made their friend's RC30 and RC45 shift so smoothly after it left the

Busy Little Shop... I hate to break it to them but it wasn't the oil

that made the difference it was rider technique and the elimination of

clutch drag... so before I will dump one slick shifting oil for the

next slick shifting oil I work with them on their technique and their

clutch... then and only then will they understand that they were

fooled into thinking it was the oil when in fact it was technique and

clutch...

I think we are after the same thing... smooth shift without upsetting

the suspension... the secret is moving the foot quicker than clutch or

throttle... go easy with the clutch and throttle but move your foot

quicker... but worry there is no such thing as too quick... its the

first step of seemless shifting in MotoGp...

Here are the steps how to check your clutch for drag... your gears

can't shift smoothly if your clutch is part way engaged...

1 Place your bike on the center stand...

2 Start engine and establish a steady idle...

3 Squeeze in the clutch and hold... shift into first gear...

4 Now look at the rear wheel... if it's spinning step on the rear brake...

does this action drag down the engine rpms???

If you bike is equipped with an cable then adjust the clutch lever

knob clock wise (out) 1/4 turn and check again check for clutch

drag... if you bike is equipped with hydraulics bleed system and check

for bubbles...

Ultimately you want the rear wheel to stop spinning when the engine is

idling and first gear selected with the clutch lever is squeezed in...

Nice debunker there! My veefalo does that, I have yet to change the clutch fluid - bled the brakes last summer but did not bleed the clutch fluid. I will try this technique out, the veefalo shifts very nicely though really. I have been using the rotella stuff myself 10w 30 - rated JA but for cars, its almost twice the price for the MA stuff and well I am with 2thdr on the cost issues - I change it twice as often as the manual recommends and I have a scott resuable filter that I really like - graded for same size particles as the paper filters and better flow. I have had it for 5 years now and it cleans up every time, I run water though it in the opposite direction to force out stuck particles and clean with degreaser on the stainless filter, wipe off the smuged up iron/steel paste on the magnet. I change the oil more often then most, and before every big cross country trip.

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  • Member Contributer

Nice debunker there! My veefalo does that, I have yet to change the clutch fluid - bled the brakes last summer but did not bleed the clutch fluid. I will try this technique out, the veefalo shifts very nicely though really. I have been using the rotella stuff myself 10w 30 - rated JA but for cars, its almost twice the price for the MA stuff and well I am with 2thdr on the cost issues - I change it twice as often as the manual recommends and I have a scott resuable filter that I really like - graded for same size particles as the paper filters and better flow. I have had it for 5 years now and it cleans up every time, I run water though it in the opposite direction to force out stuck particles and clean with degreaser on the stainless filter, wipe off the smuged up iron/steel paste on the magnet. I change the oil more often then most, and before every big cross country trip.

Thanks Miguel

Whats interesting is that according to actual viscosity numbers

published by the oil companies all 30wt oils have about the same

viscosity at 212F operating temps... whether its a 0 30 or a 5 30 or

10 30 or even a straight weight 30 they all flow close to a viscosity

of 10... but during start when the most wear occurs because we are

spinning the crank on dry bearings the viscosity of 30 weight oils

ranges from 56 (good) to 97 (poor)... it no secret that an 0 30 with a

viscosity of 56 allows oil to flow to the critical dry bearings

quicker than a straight weight 30 with a viscosity of 97... a 0 30 and

a straight 30 are the same thickness at operating temps... it just 0

30 is refined higher to flow more during critical start... the proof

in the numbers... the ability of 0 30 to flow quicker at start up

before warm up is why I switched from a 10 30 to a 0 30 in Mr.RC45...

So in the interest of longevity I use 0 30 EC oil and I warm the oil

up to 212F before selecting first gear...

Every oil company list viscosity of their oil at 2 temps 104ºF (40ºC)

start temp and 212ºF (100ºC) operating temp... the lowest viscosity at

start up reaches the critical bearings the quickest...

Mobil 1 0 30 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 56.7

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 10.3

Shell Rotella T 10W30 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 83

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 12.1

Viscosity of straight weight 30

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 97

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 11.7

You can see what the problem with oil is... its too thick at start up

temp and just right at operating temps... the lesson that should be

learned is to idle the engine up to operating temp of 100ºC / 212ºF

before selecting first gear if you wish to properly lubricate your

engine...

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  • Member Contributer

Larry the only Mobil 1, 0W-30 I'm finding is something called "Advanced Fuel Economy". I've included a link. Is this what you are using?

http://www.mobiloil....il_1_0W-30.aspx

It shows similar viscosity numbers to what you quoted,

@ 40 degrees C: 63

@ 110 degrees C: 11

But their 0W-40 product has higher viscosity @ 40 degrees C: 75

Motorcycle specific Racing 4T specs: not any better than Rotella really

@40 degrees C: 82

@110 degrees C: 13

And what about "Viscosity Index"? how does that figure in?

Still somewhat confused with my 6th gen since Mother Honda is recommending 10W-40, it seems I should be using the 0W-40 employing your logic.

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