Jump to content

joneill

Member Contributer
  • Content Count

    122
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

24 Excellent

About joneill

  • Rank
    Factory Team Rider

Profile Information

  • Location
    North Andover, MA
  • In My Garage:
    1998 VFR800FI (mine)
    1999 VFR800FI (Son's)
    2012 Ninja 1000 ABS (Wife's)

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. 1998 VFR 44-45 mpg on E0, ~40-42 mpg on E10, 87 octane, very consistent mpg for the last 70K miles. And yes they smell like they are running rich, sorta like a mid 60's muscle car🙂
  2. Long thread on the suspension but worth a read..... Bottom line, measure the sag and change out the stock springs if necessary to get the spring rates right for your weight. After you do that you can fine tune with adjusting the shock damping.
  3. I had posted these tips for inspecting a new VFR purchase previously but they might give you some ideas of what to look when buying a new motorcycle and all these can be done as part of a walk around with no tools except a volt meter and a flashlight. 1) I would check the charging voltage at idle and 5K RPM with the high beams on. It should be at least 13.8V or you have some charging issues. It is easy to do with a voltmeter, just remove the seat. Check the forum there are plenty of threads on charging issues on the VFR. 2) Obviously check tires, brakes, chain, brake and clutch fluid color. The fluids should be clear. If they look like tea or coffee they need to be replaced. Wear or replacements items are good negotiating points. 3) With the bike on the center stand, have someone push down on the rear and lift the front wheel off the ground. Turn the wheel left and right and feel for binding or a notch at dead center. This is a sign that the bike needs new head bearings. I have had to replace bearings at 20K miles on some VFRs. Check the fork seals – look for oil on the fork tubes. 4) Obviously, check the overall condition of the finish and look for missing or non OEM fasteners or new panels or missing decals. Look for scrapes on the end of the clutch and brake levers, bent shifter and brake foot levers, bar end weights, and on 5th gens look for a black block off plate on the underside of the fairing between the headlights. A missing plate or scrapes indicated a fall or accident. 5) Arrive when the bike is “cold”. It should start easily, idle well and be ridable without requiring any warm up. 6) Finally look in the tank for signs of rust – use a flashlight 7) Not to go to CSI on you – but bring a flash light when you inspect the bike. A good light will help with the inspection. 8) Make sure you get the factory tool kit. Most of the wrenches and screwdrivers are poor quality but you will need the chain adjusting tool and the shock adjusting tool. Ask for the owner’s manual. It doesn’t hurt to ask if the PO has a shop manual. He might throw that in as part of the deal. Oh, and get both keys. 9) Ask to see the title. I bring my gear and money. In my experience the only way to get a test ride is to show up with the purchase price in cash. You break it - you own it. I won't purchase a motorcycle without riding it first. As far as being concerned for my safety or the safety of my money, I arrange to meet at the seller's residence and not someplace shady like a gas station or parking lot. I don't go alone. You will need someone to drive the car back if you buy the motorcycle -right? Finally, go during daylight hours. Its easier to see what you are buying in daylight. Low light or interior lighting hide a lot of imperfection that show up when you get it home and see for the first time in the daylight.
  4. joneill

    Bike Feb 2012 R

    Wow, I had to do a double take. I like the silver, especially the polished exhaust headers.
  5. I see the comment regarding different oils providing "smooth" or "smoother shifting". I noticed the same thing only once, long ago using Motul on a 91 VX800 but have not seen the phenomena since. Does anyone have know why different oils could cause smoother shifting? I does not seem viscosity related but it seems to be brand specific.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.