Jump to content
vegaquark

Winter cooling improvement project

Recommended Posts

Hi there people, an image is worth a thousand words so here it goes two thousand words:

6bd12ccc33b21a2fa30b7566b8dd4805.jpg

dd6cf7126ec39dfce68da441ec026f0a.jpg

This is what i came up with, now i'm thinking about taking it to a welding shop to accomodate a pair of tabs and cut this tubing to match a bigger one that is oriented properly to plug into each side rad.

I feel like this could end with the cooling problems we have on traffic jams during summer (even if we all know that the hotter the viffer the better it runs)

So i've come up with this and i'll try to keep you all updated about how it goes

9f76830d41032d67206825bed56fc903.jpg

 

 

The rad came out of an scrapyard from an unknown KTM (presumably from a 50cc cross style one)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From those pictures it looks like you could increase your VFR's cooling efficiency (heat rejection ability) by cleaning/degreasing your radiators (both the coolant radiators and the oil cooler).  Also, removing the little rocks and tiny bits of road debris and maybe straightening out some of the bent cooling fins will probably help.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the look of that oil cooler.

 

Doesn’t the VTR also have a 5 row oil cooler that fits? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2017 at 9:33 AM, GreginDenver said:

From those pictures it looks like you could increase your VFR's cooling efficiency (heat rejection ability) by cleaning/degreasing your radiators (both the coolant radiators and the oil cooler).  Also, removing the little rocks and tiny bits of road debris and maybe straightening out some of the bent cooling fins will probably help.

I actually just did this on my bike about two hours ago! I bought some air conditioner coil cleaner and sprayed liberally, let it sit for about five minutes and rinsed well. They are about as clean as I can get them now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Lint said:

I actually just did this on my bike about two hours ago! I bought some sure conditioner coil cleaner and sprayed liberally, let it sit for about five minutes and rinsed well. They are about as clean as I can get them now.

 

:fing02:  Good stuff that coil cleaner. I work in a DC that uses heat exchangers so have a supply of the stuff. great at cleaning the filth of the vanes but don't leave it too long as it can eat into the aluminium,.,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Woodie said:

 

:fing02:  Good stuff that coil cleaner. I work in a DC that uses heat exchangers so have a supply of the stuff. great at cleaning the filth of the vanes but don't leave it too long as it can eat into the aluminium,.,

I only let it sit for about five minutes or so. The manufacturer said it's aluminum safe when I called them. I didn't notice any changes in the color of the metal, aside from it being cleaner. I think I'll do it a second time on my oil cooler, that's sucker's pretty grungy.

 

 

20171117_080300.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since we're talking about increasing cooling, is there any type of test for the water pump, ie, a pressure test to ensure it's up to the task?

 

Has anyone replaced their water pump and seen a big improvement?

 

Please let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the VFR800's water pump as a long-term "consumable item".  The water pump isn't expensive and the oldest 5th Gens are now 20 years old.  I just went ahead and replaced the water pump for my peace of mind during the next 20 years (I hope I ride that long).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with stock water pumps is they can't be efficient at all revs, as their speed is linked to engine speed. At idle after a hard run they don't pump enough fluid & at high revs they cavitate a lot, so are actually closer to ideal than you might think.

 

I replaced mine with an electric one, it has the advantage of operating at a better Lt/min rate ALL the time, so at speed its just right & at idle it to much, which is great for helping to dissipate the heat, plus as its rigged to a relay from the ignition, when you stop, you can leave it running with the engine off if the bike/air temp is really hot.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the middle of refreshing an '07 with 48,000, on it. Going through the cooling system. Pulled the water pump. Replaced both O-rings. The shaft bearings seemed to be in good shape - no rough spots, tight fitment. I thought I'd need to replace it but I'm going to wait a bit and see how it goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 07/12/2017 at 4:13 PM, Mohawk said:

.

 

I replaced mine with an electric one, it has the advantage of operating at a better Lt/min rate ALL the time, so at speed its just right & at idle it to much, which is great for helping to dissipate the heat, plus as its rigged to a relay from the ignition, when you stop, you can leave it running with the engine off if the bike/air temp is really hot.

 

Mohawk, your post inspired me to look into electric pumps. Didn’t even know they were an option till I read it .

 

Are there any drawbacks/pitfalls I need to consider? Many of the sites I’ve read say it isn’t really suitable for street bikes. Have you had any issues or improvements?

 

Is it lighter/heavier than the mechanical pump you removed? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Stary, No issues since I fitted it about 5 years ago. When the Fi finishes priming with the ignition on, you can hear the soft whine of the electric motor. I've had the bike in high 30's C temps, climbing mountains in Europe & no issues. Likewise been at the top of mountains over 10,000ft with snow on the ground with no issues.

 

I didn't weigh the parts removed & those fitted, so called it a draw, the water pump is not very heavy. I also fitted a lower temp fan switch & swapped to a VTR fan blade (blows out) so the fan comes on at 90C & off again around 75C, which stops the bike getting too hot in stop go traffic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris, apologies if I've asked this before, but what model water pump did you use?

 

Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/12/2017 at 1:49 PM, Mohawk said:

 Stary, No issues since I fitted it about 5 years ago..

Thanks Mohawk, very useful insight. On the back of your observations I am going to look more seriously at this option. 

 

I’ve already fitted a VTR blower fan and lower temp fan switch. Why on earth did Honda think it was a good idea for the fan to wait until 104 degrees before switching on when 80 is optimal for internal combustion engines?

 

Anyway, there are very cheap aftermarket switches that kick in at 80 on eBay - £5 a throw! Mine works fine for now. Cheap enough to replace if it fails. 

 

Stray

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Stray said:

Thanks Mohawk, very useful insight. On the back of your observations I am going to look more seriously at this option. 

 

I’ve already fitted a VTR blower fan and lower temp fan switch. Why on earth did Honda think it was a good idea for the fan to wait until 104 degrees before switching on when 80 is optimal for internal combustion engines?

 

Anyway, there are very cheap aftermarket switches that kick in at 80 on eBay - £5 a throw! Mine works fine for now. Cheap enough to replace if it fails. 

 

Stray

 

If I fitted a switch to kick in at 80 my fan would be running pretty much all the time here in Aus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I installed ebay aluminum radiators and a spal reverse flow fan, and my cooling issues have been solved. 

In the few months of commuting since the install, bike never goes above 221F. This even in stop and go DC traffic.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Link man. We need links!!

 

Radiators, electric water pumps, fan switches, fans. 

 

All of the above seem to have helped, so can you guys help others out by posting links to the goodies? It would save a lot of time and ensure we get the right parts.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A brief search on Amazon will turn up a variety of water resistant switches to operate or turn off the fan.   A 2 position switch will allow the fan to be forced on or for the thermo switch to control it.  I used a 3 position (dual throw) switch to also allow me to turn the fan off at speed, when it's fighting the airflow.  I prefer the round style so that I can drill a hole for mounting vs cutting a square hole.  There are many options.  I have seen toggle switches mounted around the grips on some bikes, but generally those are not designed for potentially wet environments. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=waterproof+rocker+switch

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/23/2017 at 10:14 PM, Lint said:

Link man. We need links!!

 

Radiators, electric water pumps, fan switches, fans. 

 

All of the above seem to have helped, so can you guys help others out by posting links to the goodies? It would save a lot of time and ensure we get the right parts.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Lots of ideas here!
Yes, i'll clean my rads soon, but the issue of eating away the aluminium is always a concern when using aggressive chemicals.
The idea i've liked the most in here was the electrical pump one!
Maybe is not good at all for the battery-regulator system, but if you combine that with led cluster and led tail lights you can compensate the electrical load...
We deserve more info about that pump project! Please share it with us!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.