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The rear axle and a hammer...


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Ok guys.. the chin adjuster seized so I decided to take I apart..

Took off the exhaust, broke the axle nut (with some great force and effort), removed the brake caliper and then I was stuck...

The sprocket would not come off..

Using a piece of wood and a lump hammer (and a few days soak with penetrating wd40) and a few wacks eventually the sprocket came off.. wahoo!

 

The unfortunate part is I am now stuck here..

I got a bigger wood and a bigger hammer and have given the axle a few more belts but nothing.. not a budge.

 

Iam stumped.. any suggestions?

IMG_20210715_135151.jpg

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Are you following the Service Manual (downloadable from this site)?

 

I haven't taken the rear hub off a VFR for a few years and I can't remember any differences from the 5th Gen, but I thought you needed to remove the brake disc assembly?

 

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable will be along soon.

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3 hours ago, Skids said:

Are you following the Service Manual (downloadable from this site)?

 

I haven't taken the rear hub off a VFR for a few years and I can't remember any differences from the 5th Gen, but I thought you needed to remove the brake disc assembly?

 

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable will be along soon.

Yes sir.. I have it done along with the manual.. I believe that it has corroded on as the full sprocket should slide off and the axle should slide out!

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What you are dealing with are the negative effects of of corrosion...

mainly due to riding in the rain or hitting your prize with a garden hose...

both acts promotes corrosion in all the little nooks and crannies

hidden from view... The pitfull is that metal is etched for life...

 

Your axle is probably frozen at the wheel bearings due to corrosion
from either rain riding or washing your bike with a garden hose... if
the rubber hammer fails then you need more force like a large steel
hammer... to protect the axle and threads source a hard wood block or
plastic... installed the nut backwards so the flange faces you...
strike the wood / plastic against the nut... the force to budge the
axle maybe extreme so be prepared for the bike to move about... also
be prepared for the axle to propel free in a shot... having a second
body helps to control the reaction to the hammer force... after the
axle is out check to make sure the wheel bearings are still seated in
their place... a little grease will prevent this from happening
again...

 

Heat helps... always tackle disassembly after a ride when all the parts are

up to temp... working with room temp parts is more resistance...

 

 

VFRAxleCorrosion.JPG

P1013415.JPG

Pat16RC3001.JPG

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2 hours ago, BusyLittleShop said:

you are dealing with are the negative effects of of corrosion...

BusyLittleShop you legend. Got the bugger off. Put the nut on, gave it a belt and bing bang boosh! Lots and lots of corrosion.. the inside of the sprocket looking not so good nor the axle itself.. any tips to clean these bad boys?

Also you nailed it on the head.. I use this bike year around and also washed it down a couple times with the hose

 

Next part is to remove the caliper mounting plate.. also wont budge!! Wahoo

image.jpg

image.jpg

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Glad you got it (at least partly) sorted! :beer:

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I know it was a pig to get out but that doesn't look anywhere near as bad as I thought it would look like. 

 

Should clean up a treat.

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On 7/17/2021 at 11:58 AM, Walker1 said:

BusyLittleShop you legend. Got the bugger off. Put the nut on, gave it a belt and bing bang boosh! Lots and lots of corrosion.. the inside of the sprocket looking not so good nor the axle itself.. any tips to clean these bad boys?

 

 
Here are my axle care notes that I send out to RC30/ RC45 owners...
you'll have to download the photos for the lesson to make sense...

Because the RC30 and RC45 employ the same caged needle bearing the
rides directly on on the rear axle I offer my method to clean both the
axle and bearing...

gallery_3131_51_61974.jpg


Once you have the bearing removed you employ a two jewelers screw
drivers and carefully lift each roller from the cage...
gallery_3131_51_49199.jpg


Give the rollers and cage a bath in gasoline... you be surprised at
all the dirty deposits hidden in the old grease and every nook and
cranny... you're looking at the deposits after only 10K miles of
normal operation...
gallery_3131_51_47395.jpg


Once the bearing are really clean lay them out and inspect each roller
for scoring...
gallery_3131_51_41593.jpg

Dirt mixed with the old grease will leave a trail of deposits on the
axle at point B...
gallery_3131_51_14606.jpg

Spun in a Lathe... it's easy to remove the deposits employing a gray
micro fine 3M pad... it's soft enough that it does *not* remove any
precious metal... employ a soft wire wheel to bring the other parts of
the axle back to a luster...
gallery_3131_51_40032.jpg

What you'll end up with is an axle with the deposits remove plus
giving the metal a nice luster...

gallery_3131_51_39038.jpg
 

RC45AxleDrillSpin.JPG

RC45NL5AxleModFront.JPG

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1 hour ago, DannoXYZ said:

Seems kinda barbaric to whack it with hammer. Is there way to use some kind of press or gear-puller to extract?

 

Barbaric hammer blows would not be needed if owners would stop hitting their prize with a garden hose... it's tantamount to bike abuse...

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Or if they followed the service schedule & removed cleaned & repacked the rear axle.


Normal rear ends get stripped every time you change a tyre., just like your front wheel. But SSSA don't, they should get stripped & cleaned every 2-3 years & then they wouldn't need a hammer !

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interesting thread which I have bookmarked for future use, I have had my 4th gen nearly 5 years now and the previous owner "recommissioned" the bike after a long layoff and everything that I have had to do has been great as he did what he actually said he did, mine is a nice dry only bike unless I get caught out in rain so hopefully I will not have this trouble but I have not done this job yet, when I adjusted the chain it was as smooth a silk to do, again thanks to the previous owner, maybe a job for the winter, thanks to LittleBusyShop for the photo description

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3 hours ago, scottbott said:

interesting thread which I have bookmarked for future use, I have had my 4th gen nearly 5 years now and the previous owner "recommissioned" the bike after a long layoff and everything that I have had to do has been great as he did what he actually said he did, mine is a nice dry only bike unless I get caught out in rain so hopefully I will not have this trouble but I have not done this job yet, when I adjusted the chain it was as smooth a silk to do, again thanks to the previous owner, maybe a job for the winter, thanks to LittleBusyShop for the photo description

You're welcome...

 

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