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Make Your Own O2 Sensor Eliminators


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All the Dynojet documentation also says that "the O2 optimizer is trying to hit 13.6 AFR". That's not something you can do with a narrowband O2 sensor - they're either 14:1 (rich) or 15:1 (lean) and have no accuracy. Only a wideband O2 sensor can be used to set an AFR like "13.6" or something.

Hmm, I might be wrong on this. There are a lot of folks selling things called EFIE or "Electronic Fuel Injection Enhancer" which is used by people running HHO systems, and these little boxes send a customised voltage fluctuation to the ECU so that the ECU sees a falsified O2 sensor signal that forces the car's ECU to push a lean or rich trim. If you altered the O2 signal a bit to show a leaner signal than it's truly detecting, then I suppose you could use the same kind of thinking to tweak the output signal of the O2 sensor so that the resulting fuel mixture was right about 13.6 AFR, even with a narrowband O2 sensor.

Again the only reason I can think that Dynojet is doing these O2 optimizers would be because the ECU on some bikes flashes a fuel injection error code when it sees a permanent 0.0 signal from an O2 sensor, which is what happens when you use an O2 eliminator.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest BootBuckle

Great video... that clears a lot of things up. I've got gotten an '02 VFR, and I'm mapping out a modification plan of attack. The whole PC + O2 eliminator mod was throwing me off a bit, but now I think I've got it straight. Thanks!

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  • 6 months later...

So does the PCV allow timing changes on my y2k vfr? Earlier it was said that PCIII cannot do timing adjustments... And timing is essential to gaining the most power, adding fuel only gets you so far before you need to adjust the timing

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

I have tried this and this really works, the bike feels and sounds a lot smoother but a flatspot betwen 4k-5k rmp , but why !!! Any one got a clue why it's possible to do this with the ECU. Is there any hidden test modes to set up the ECU in, or perhaps some feature that don't got to the consumer lines.

And for the "I think Das Bone has documented this too" can't find it, can you give me any directions ... :goofy:

!! parden my english it's not my native language !!

From another post that I posted yesterday:

Apparently the ECU isn't fooled by the O2-eliminator mod and when it enters closed loop mode, it tries to adjust the air/fuel ratio. Unfortunately, any adjustments the ECU makes won’t register because the O2-eliminators are sending a constant signal to the computer. So the ECU continues to adjusts the air/fuel mixture in a vain attempt to reach the stoichiometric ratio and it eventually leans out the air/fuel mixture so much that the engine loses a ton of power. When you twist the throttle a bit, the ECU leaves closed loop mode and goes back to the default map. The engine suddenly makes power again and the bike lurches violently forward.

Ironically, the O2-eliminators are suppose to make the ECU think everything as just fine when it enters closed loop mode, but it instead has cause some bikes to surge severely.

The trick around this is to prevent the bike from entering closed loop mode. This can be achieved by starting the bike before the ECU has a chance to complete its boot up cycle.

Now, when you turn the ignition on, you see the digital gauges flash on once and then display normally. I believe this is caused by the ECU going though a boot up cycle. If you start the bike before the ECU finishes its boot up cycle, then it won’t go into closed loop later. My guess is that by starting the bike before the ECU boots up causes an error in the ECU. To protect the bike, the ECU loads the default map and sticks with it. So, once you turn the ignition on, start your bike immediately and you shouldn’t have any more surging issues. (Likewise, there’s no reason this wouldn’t work for bikes without O2-eliminators either).

This is my start up procedure (which seems to work very well to avoid this surging problem):

1) Turn ignition on.

2) Put the bike into neutral.

3) Wait for the fuel pump to prime the fuel system.

4) Once FI system is primed, then in quick secession: turn ignition off, push the starter button, turn ignition on, release starter once bike starts.

Has this been confirmed? It seems there are people out there that don't go through this procedure and everything is great. Myself however, when I hold throttle and go into closed loop mode (I have a PCV), I start to lose power! This post is rather old so I am trying to see if there is some more information learned by now since then. One theory of mine is that one or two of my o2 eliminators (they came with the PCV) may be bad.

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  • 1 month later...
  • Member Contributer

I have done this mod today and can only say this: WAUW!

It's brilliant, not only makes it the pairing mode obsolete but it also makes the bike respond well from about 2500 rpm.

I have done some serious digging and you do not need a power-commander or anything to feel the difference.

What this mod does is simple, it tell the ECU that your Lambda-sensor is connected, nothing more nothing less.

A working sensor does provide a voltage to the ECU to what the ECU responds by using some sort of mapping.

Because the mod omits the voltage, the ECU will think the sensor is broken, it knows this after about 3 minutes.

You can smell this during starting as the ECU keeps pumping extra fuel that doesn't ignite well, as such the exhaust will smell a lot after petrol.

As the ECU notices that the "sensor" doesn't respond to it's regulation it assumes it's broken and starts a special optimized combustion-program that has static parameters.

This special program is optimal, and you know it as the power is there and the response is brilliant!

It's also this program that the power-commder uses to control the injection.

However, you do not need a power-commander, the optimal program is already in the ECU and works as expected.

There is instantly a lot of extra power and torque, if you wait 3 minutes after starting.

I have done this mod on a VFR800Fi 2000 and a CBR1000RR, and on both machines the results are great.

Also, this mod makes the ECU just respond to the throttle and not to the O2/CO2-level anymore, as it thinks the sensor is broken.

Yes when you start it smells bad, but it quickly returns to normal with an improved riding experience.

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  • Member Contributer

One theory of mine is that one or two of my o2 eliminators (they came with the PCV) may be bad.

Your "eliminator" is nothing more then a ~330Ohm resistor, nothing more, you can measure it.

Remove it, then measure the 2 pins (normally connected to the white O2-sensor wires) and it should read about 330~1000Ohm.

These "eliminators" do nothing more then fool the ECU that an O2-sensor is present, that is it.

They do not eliminate anything.

Because if you forget them, it will make your FI-light come on and the ECU tells you something is wrong, however that also means you miss any real important problem with your bike.

You do not want the FI-light on all the time, telling you the bike has a problem :cheerleader:

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  • 1 month later...

I have done this mod today and can only say this: WAUW!

It's brilliant, not only makes it the pairing mode obsolete but it also makes the bike respond well from about 2500 rpm.

I have done some serious digging and you do not need a power-commander or anything to feel the difference.

What this mod does is simple, it tell the ECU that your Lambda-sensor is connected, nothing more nothing less.

A working sensor does provide a voltage to the ECU to what the ECU responds by using some sort of mapping.

Because the mod omits the voltage, the ECU will think the sensor is broken, it knows this after about 3 minutes.

You can smell this during starting as the ECU keeps pumping extra fuel that doesn't ignite well, as such the exhaust will smell a lot after petrol.

As the ECU notices that the "sensor" doesn't respond to it's regulation it assumes it's broken and starts a special optimized combustion-program that has static parameters.

This special program is optimal, and you know it as the power is there and the response is brilliant!

It's also this program that the power-commder uses to control the injection.

However, you do not need a power-commander, the optimal program is already in the ECU and works as expected.

There is instantly a lot of extra power and torque, if you wait 3 minutes after starting.

I have done this mod on a VFR800Fi 2000 and a CBR1000RR, and on both machines the results are great.

Also, this mod makes the ECU just respond to the throttle and not to the O2/CO2-level anymore, as it thinks the sensor is broken.

Yes when you start it smells bad, but it quickly returns to normal with an improved riding experience.

The only thing with mine, I am not sure it resets after 3 min. seems to always be rich gassy does not run hot, no hotter than VFR's do anyways....

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  • 6 months later...
  • Member Contributer

hey,

don't spose you guys know if this Lil trick with the o2 eliminators will work over here in the uk?

I've had O2 eliminators on my 08 for a couple of years now. No PC fitted, no other engine mods and I do believe it makes the bike run better at low revs. Mind you, so does a good SV balance. And it's a very subjective assessment.

I'm going to try the ignition ON/OFF/ON thing mentioned above and see if that makes a difference to the quiet spot ~5krpm.

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  • Member Contributer

hey,

don't spose you guys know if this Lil trick with the o2 eliminators will work over here in the uk?

I've had O2 eliminators on my 08 for a couple of years now. No PC fitted, no other engine mods and I do believe it makes the bike run better at low revs. Mind you, so does a good SV balance. And it's a very subjective assessment.

I'm going to try the ignition ON/OFF/ON thing mentioned above and see if that makes a difference to the quiet spot ~5krpm.

Tried it, twice, this morning, before & after refuel on the way to work (35 miles, town & highway). Whilst I'm not 100% convinced yet I'm pretty sure there is less of a "lack of drive" from 4500-6000-ish rpm. Certainly in 6th gear, the roll on from ~5krpm feels smoother and more linear.

Surely it can't be that easy?

I'm going to carry on trying this for a few more days then revert back to normal start procedure and see if I can spot a difference.

Edited by Skids
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  • 1 month later...

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! First time posting and this was my first performance mod. It is sooooooo much smoother now. Mind you, this is actually my first bike, so I just thought the rough ride at low revs was a lack of skills (and that may still be the case). I had considered the PAIR and flapper mods but I think I will quit while ahead. If I understand correctly, I believe this mod is the alternative to the PAIR mod. I know zero about mechanics. Thanks to the creator of this post and everyone else for your feedback.

Since this is my first official post, I included a pic of my 2007 VFR (I hope it works - having trouble posting pic). Thanks for all of the advice. I couldn't continue lurking with a clean conscious without acknowleding the forum for all of the great advice and humor. :)

P.S. The exhaust was done today; O2 mod completed a couple of days ago. Delkevic mini carbons.

DJCheez VFR3

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  • Member Contributer

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! First time posting and this was my first performance mod. It is sooooooo much smoother now. Mind you, this is actually my first bike, so I just thought the rough ride at low revs was a lack of skills (and that may still be the case). I had considered the PAIR and flapper mods but I think I will quit while ahead. If I understand correctly, I believe this mod is the alternative to the PAIR mod. I know zero about mechanics. Thanks to the creator of this post and everyone else for your feedback.

Since this is my first official post, I included a pic of my 2007 VFR (I hope it works - having trouble posting pic). Thanks for all of the advice. I couldn't continue lurking with a clean conscious without acknowleding the forum for all of the great advice and humor. :)

P.S. The exhaust was done today; O2 mod completed a couple of days ago. Delkevic mini carbons.

Dude Welcome love that paint scheme. Is dark gray painted ?

Need to do a introduction post .

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  • Member Contributer

Found these while looking for a exhaust system.

EL00017_2.JPG

Honda VFR 800 1998-2010

Model: EL-00044
Unit Price:
USD

$15.10

https://www.dan-moto.com/DM_INT/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=129_141&products_id=826

You must have forgotten what the thread was about. Two resistors costing just a few cents each do the same job.

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  • Member Contributer

Found these while looking for a exhaust system.

EL00017_2.JPG

Honda VFR 800 1998-2010

Model: EL-00044
Unit Price:
USD

$15.10

https://www.dan-moto.com/DM_INT/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=129_141&products_id=826

You must have forgotten what the thread was about. Two resistors costing just a few cents each do the same job.

No did not forget but for $20.00 to the door I wouldn't make mine .

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  • Member Contributer

Found these while looking for a exhaust system.

EL00017_2.JPG

Honda VFR 800 1998-2010

Model: EL-00044
Unit Price:
USD

$15.10

https://www.dan-moto.com/DM_INT/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=129_141&products_id=826

You must have forgotten what the thread was about. Two resistors costing just a few cents each do the same job.

No did not forget but for $20.00 to the door I wouldn't make mine .

You would spend $20 over $1? There's no "making" to them. Just snip the excess length off the leads and stick them in there. Add a little bit of tape to keep them from falling out and you're done.

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  • Member Contributer

Found these while looking for a exhaust system.

EL00017_2.JPG

Honda VFR 800 1998-2010

Model: EL-00044
Unit Price:
USD

$15.10

https://www.dan-moto.com/DM_INT/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=129_141&products_id=826

You must have forgotten what the thread was about. Two resistors costing just a few cents each do the same job.

No did not forget but for $20.00 to the door I wouldn't make mine .

You would spend $20 over $1? There's no "making" to them. Just snip the excess length off the leads and stick them in there. Add a little bit of tape to keep them from falling out and you're done.

All ready have a set of home made .

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  • 4 months later...

Very very few people I suspect have ridden the VTEC VFR the way Honda engineers meant it to be ridden. Coderighter, you gotta hack that ECU, brother.

Meanwhile, I dunno, I've always been a carb guy, don't know nothing bout no fuel injection. But it just seems to me, this beast is too lean down low; it hesitates when you crack open the throttle and I think the overrun shutoff aggravates this. I do think richening things up will help, but that becomes a mapping issue and maybe the default map will work for you and maybe it won't. (With the idea being, by disabling the 02 sensors you are forcing the default map.)

If it doesn't, you can go the Coyze route and make it rich AND smooth, or you can go the Coderighter route and try to make it perfect. (Referring to PC maps.)

But I gotta think there are some ECU's locked in a safe somewhere in Japan that make this the best bike ever made. And dammit, I want one.

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If you want to ride the bike how the Honda engineers designed it to be ridin, put a Rapid Bike Racing module on it and install the optional 4 wide band o2 sensors. The included base ignition and fuelling map will get you pretty close to perfect and after about 200 miles you'll swear that you have never riden anything so smooth in your life. The VTEC transition, snatchy throttle and surging completely disappear.

Also the ignition remapping adds a significant amount of low end and midrange torque everywhere and the engine braking adjustment feature gets rid of the factory fuel cut that you were talking about.

Edited by CandyRedRC46
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