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Can't find what wattage the stator on a 3rd gen puts out.


jefferson
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I have been through the FSM and searching online and have not been able to find the specs for the watts put out by the stator on a 3rd gen. I did find an aftermarket that put out more than stock and it was rated at 260 watts if I remember right. Anyone know where to find that info or know what it is off the top of your head?

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Nearly ever bike I've owned has a spec 30-50 VAC between any two legs when running at RPM, no shorts to ground on any legs when off (~.4 ohms), and ~14VDC at the battery when running. 

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The consensus some decade ago was the 94-97 did around 500W total, with about 250W of that overhead for accessories.

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19 hours ago, YoshiHNS said:

The consensus some decade ago was the 94-97 did around 500W total, with about 250W of that overhead for accessories.

I guess a little parts cross referencing will tell me if the 90 to 93 stator is the same as the 94 to 97.

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I would have thought that info was in the service manual. My owners manual states 0,371kw/5,000rpm and the info is on page 97. Thanks for finding where to look for the info.

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I'm hoping to understand this a bit better . . . In the 3/4 FSM on page 15-5, it mentions that the regulated voltage should be 13.5 to 16V, and "Charging Current" is 5 to 9 Amps at 5,000 rpm.  Does that imply that, of the stator's output, about 130 watts  (14.5 x 9 - taking the typical regulated voltage times max current) is making it out of the R/R with the rest lost to heat at the R/R?  Possibly similar to crankshaft and rear wheel horsepower - some loss in the system to get a net available number?   Is that a proper interpretation?  What is it Honda is telling us with those numbers?   Maybe someone with better knowledge of power systems than I possess could shed some light on that.  I've wondered similar - not just what can the stator put out but what is the net available to be drawn from the system. 

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I'll take a swag that the charging voltage isn't the capacity of the stator, more like, what is necessary to run the bike.  Most bikes I know have around 300-350 in the older bikes, so you have some extra to run some accessories.... normally I haven't seen a manufacturer lower the output from what a prior model of the same bike was......    if it's a concern, install a voltmeter and monitor usage with accessories, but you should be able to run some heated grips and say a heated jacket liner without too much of an issue.  While on, if the voltage drops to below 12.9 or say 13, you're starting to lose battery as the charging is just barely keeping up... so dial down on the accessories.

So you can manage that, even if you get down to the mid-12's, remember to plug in a charger when you get home, your battery is no longer fully charged.  It would help to dial the accessories way down on that last half hour of riding too.

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On 1/23/2022 at 1:57 PM, Cogswell said:

I'm hoping to understand this a bit better . . . In the 3/4 FSM on page 15-5, it mentions that the regulated voltage should be 13.5 to 16V, and "Charging Current" is 5 to 9 Amps at 5,000 rpm.  Does that imply that, of the stator's output, about 130 watts  (14.5 x 9 - taking the typical regulated voltage times max current) is making it out of the R/R with the rest lost to heat at the R/R?  Possibly similar to crankshaft and rear wheel horsepower - some loss in the system to get a net available number?   Is that a proper interpretation?  What is it Honda is telling us with those numbers?   Maybe someone with better knowledge of power systems than I possess could shed some light on that.  I've wondered similar - not just what can the stator put out but what is the net available to be drawn from the system. 

Yes, take two DC current clamps and measure output (5 below) and dump (4) lines of RR. You'll see that sum of the 2 will always equal ~30amps. So if output is 10amps to charge battery and run bike, dump line will be 20amps. Turn on fog lights and heated gloves and output goes up to 20amps and dump goes down to 10amps.

 

3-phase2Bregulator2Bwiring.png

That's why we have such issues with fried stators, burnt stator connectors and failing RR. Generating 350 watts @ stator and running it all through RR fulltime is just torture!  New generation series regulators are so much better. They only pass through as much power as being consumed and that's it. Keeps stator happy and RR is actually cool enough to touch after riding! 🙂

 

 

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So it sounds as though in the FSM they're specifying the range of watts draw to charge the battery, not the overall capacity of the system. Or, could it be the amount needed to charge the battery and run the basic systems - ignition, headlights, etc. ?    It seems odd that the OP's question goes unaswered in the FSM - Honda seems very good about covering everything else. 

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Honda does seem to re-use as many parts as possible. From pg 104 of 1993 Owners Manual:

 

ED03D8F2-B2AF-4BDF-822B-943E61581EE1.thumb.png.54f353e35a38c14883593c5587e4f73c.png

 

E7BA6923-516B-454A-AD94-7106D22EB166.thumb.png.0e2c238ddf5dbd7562fe0a798a3558bd.png

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