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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/14/20 in all areas

  1. Haven't been around in a while. Sold my mint 2001 years ago and bought a Diavel. Lately, I've been searching for a perfect 2000. Something to could just cruise on. The Ducati is awesome, but sometimes I just want to take it easy. Getting older I guess. Ive passed on multiple "clean" ones. It's amazing what people think "mint" is. After a year or so of searching, I finally found one. No shit, 2800 original miles. Everything, and I mean everything is there. The only thing that I could find missing was the rubber frame plug for the idle adjustment. Tires, brakes, oil, coolant, brake fluid, all o
    1 point
  2. Hiya Skids Helpful facts to ponder... auto oilers lube only the external roller and between the roller and the sprockets (red area in my drawing)... they do not lube the X rings nor behind the X rings so any oil applied in that effort is wasted fling off... The running oil leak lowers the operating temp where the factory installed grease has a chance to live longer before the first adjustment... but the fact remains adjustment is taking up the slack cause by metal to metal wear at the critical pin and roller junction because the factory installed grease is beginning to fai
    1 point
  3. So rode a bunch back before marriage/klds. Favorite ride back then was a kz1000j that I rode the hell out of. My wife has been uber supportive and I found this lovely gem. a 1998 VFR with 13K miles, vfrness installed, sargent seat, heated grips, new pirellei diablo 2's for only 2K. I jumped on it and 500 miles already logged on it I'm over the moon happy with it. The engine runs like it's new. Anyhoo i always wanted a 5th gen vfr and happy to join the club 😉
    1 point
  4. Picking the bike up next Friday Pretty hyped 🙂 The ECU is fitted underneath the tank i assume? Have already been in contact with Sabsteef ECU tuning (Stefan) and plan to do the remote tuning to get rid of the power restrictions etc.
    1 point
  5. BTW - this is special relay that apparently has some circuitry inside that keeps it ON between grounding pulses from ignitor. Probably a capacitor & diode inside to keep it engaged just long enough for next ignition pulse to come along. What's this jumper you made do? Does it bypass relay and just bridges black to black/blue wire on relay-connector and powers pump any time run-switch is ON? Here's some simple quick tests with multimeter. Remove relay from connector: 1. key ON, run-switch ON, measure voltage at black wire going into relay connector
    1 point
  6. Lol, now that's just funny... This is the most conceited shit I have heard in a long time. You're basically saying your uninspired vision for the bike is for them to all stay stock forever. Doesn't matter who owns it nor how they want to use the bike, how they like it to look, how they want to dump excessive money into modding it to become their dream machine. I chose this platform as a huge personal project instead of just flipping it. As mentioned previously, I did extensive research into the bike once I realized it had a uniqueness to it. Yes I was only initially inter
    1 point
  7. Also the Service Manual doesn't offer much in the way of description. It just offers a continuity and voltage check of the three wires to the relay. Its operation though is to simply disable the fuel pump if the engine is not running.
    1 point
  8. The gas companies pitch that the higher the octane the better it burns The rule is don't buy more octane than you need. Octane is one formula in the alkane series of hydrocarbons. Made up of 8 carbon atoms singled bonded together with 18 hydrogen atoms connected. Although octane is a simple organic compound, it was some what expensive to Crack and supply in large quantities. so todays gas has no real octane. What we use is an octane rating system. The properties of this formula is that it burns slow when ignited; therefore it does not detonate or knock during heavy loading o
    1 point
  9. That's all good stuff Cogswell but isn't FromMaine referring to the Fuel Cut Relay on a 4gen? Looking at the circuit diagram this is a special 3 pin relay that is energized by ignition pulses, then sends power to the Fuel Pump. So it doesn't appear to be the normal relay coil arrangement, possibly electronic! Not too sure how you would test this relay outside of the bike. I believe some 4gen owners just link the relay out and don't bother with it! Sorry, I have no experience with a 4gen.
    1 point
  10. Relays can seem like a bit of black magic - but they're basically an electrically actuated switch. I try to think of them as a normal rocker switch (could also be the ignition switch) with a coil that activates the rocker instead of your hand. In the diagram below (plenty on line with a search), the numbering of the terminals is pretty typical, though from Japan it could be different. Power from a switch (like a headlight switch) comes across terminals 86/85. When that happens, the switch inside the relay is electrically triggered (closed) providing usually an audible "click", and then wit
    1 point
  11. Correct. Without any vacuum applied to the diaphragm it is spring loaded to the open position. When the control solenoid is energized it allows vacuum to act on the diaphragm pulling the flapper to the closed position. The other option is to simply pull the vacuum hose off the flapper diaphragm and plug/seal the vacuum hose. The flapper will be fully open. I've used the end of a drill just the right size to plug the hose in the past. Guess what you're trying to isolate is either a noisy diaphragm or a noisy solenoid. Just for info - I've removed all the hardware of t
    1 point
  12. I sold my 6th gen. two weeks ago. Ending odometer reading was 101,012. 🙂
    1 point
  13. Mate. That looks Great. I've always liked the OEM bronze but the black with red trim tape looks very smart love it. Here's a tip....buy yourself a tube of Autosol Metal Polish and polish up the nice nickel chrome exhaust just under your right footpeg, it does a great job. Here's my bike and after 76,000k pipe looks like new. Cheers.
    1 point
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