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VFR owners delight in the ease of changing your own brake pads, 20 min job and very simple! No need to remove the calipers.

Step 1

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Remove the pad pin cap with flat head screwdriver

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Remove the pad pin with the hex key in your tool kit

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Of coarse this one was frozen and I stripped the key I had to get a harder key

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Step 2

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once the pad pin is out the old pads practically fall out

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The caliper only has pistons on one side, they are opposed by a flat plate not an opposing piston so one side might not wear like the other

To put in the new pads you must retract the pistons by pushing the caliper into the wheel first, if the brake pistons are not retracted you will not have room for the new thicker pads, there is a retaining clip at the top of the caliper where the pads sort of clip into to hold them in, slide them in the same way the old ones came out, then thread the pad pin thru the pad holes and tighten the pin, replace the cap, then pump the front brake to get the brakes to engage. DO NOT PUMP THE BRAKES UNTIL THE PADS ARE INSTALLED FIRST.

Note, when pushing on the caliper to get the brake piston to retract you must monitor the fluid level in the brake fluid resiviour so that it does not over fill.

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  • 9 years later...
Guest Gamecock94

They need to take the cover off the Master Cylinder and suck out a little fluid when pushing on the caliper (so you can retract the pistons AND it doesn't overflow). Put a rag around the MC just in case of overflow.....brake fluid on paint is BAD. Once pads are in fill MC back up as necessary, put cover back on, THEN pump brakes. NEVER pump brakes with cover off, especially with low MC fluid level or you are sucking air into the system and will have to bleed the whole thing. I know it seems obvious to a seasoned biker, but a newbie might not follow what you were saying and you didn't mention until the last line.

Edited by Gamecock94
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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • Member Contributer

PS. I am most interested in what pad is best for the rear on a 5th Gen. I like OEM pads on the front but my rear brake has always felt a bit on the weak side.

because of the complexity of the LBS - all the valves need to be bleed correctly and should not have any air what so even.

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  • Member Contributer

EBC HH metal sintered pads is what I use on both my bikes. Never any problems and they work very well.

Rollin

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A word of caution here. The pistons usually get cruddy and as the pads wear, they move out considerably further than when the pads were new.

This crud is usually pretty hard by pad change time and when the pistons get pushed back in to make way for the new fatter pads, that crud gets pushed in with them past the very thin neoprene "O" rings that hold the fluid in and allow the pistons to move when the brakes are applied.

Without taking the entire caliper off and cleaning the pistons, you are inviting two things. The first is leaks and the second is stuck pads that don't retract properly after the brakes are applied.

The voice of ugly experience speaks. Now the pistons get cleaned to a shine at all my brake changes.

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  • Forum CEO

The entire caliper set should probably be rebuilt every 5 years or more often with more mileage, I rebuilt mine at 120k - the slider pin was completely dry on both fronts and the rear was worse, I cleaned and polished the cylinders replaced all the o-rings (that's a biotch) - removed the slider pin, and replaced the torn boots over them, and then greased up the slider pin with high temp grease. The slider pin is important since it lets the caliper float with the floating disc. One of the pistons was etched by salts, I ended up replacing it since I did not want the thing to leak. Then I got ran over in Tennesse and the bike got totalled 1 month after all that darned work on it!

I used EBC HH+ pads on the fronts and OEM on the back, the one time I used ebc on the rear they where way way too grabby, the rear brake should not be grabby! I tried non sintered pads but they just do not perform very well on the 5th gen.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 6 months later...
  • Member Contributer

Just replaced the front pads with EBC HH sintered. Did it the lazy way without removing calipers and doing the piston clean up. I did spray brakleen liberally to clean up the loose dust and debris prior to seating the new pads. Any reason to replace the rear pads now if they don't really need it? Oh yeah, used hi temp grease on backs of pads and on pad pin as suggested.

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  • Member Contributer

No need to replace the rear pads if they have plenty left. I never have had my front and rear pads need changing out at the same time yet.

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  • Member Contributer

No need to replace the rear pads if they have plenty left. I never have had my front and rear pads need changing out at the same time yet.

Thanks...

I changed the front pads since they hadn't been changed in over 20k miles and they looked to me like they were about 75% done, comparing the thickness to the new ones. This was just a guesstimate on my part before I removed the pads. When I removed them, there was probably 3-4 mm of thickness left. How do you know how much more is actually left before hearing squealing or damaging the rotors? Did I change them too early?

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No need to replace the rear pads if they have plenty left. I never have had my front and rear pads need changing out at the same time yet.

Thanks...

I changed the front pads since they hadn't been changed in over 20k miles and they looked to me like they were about 75% done, comparing the thickness to the new ones. This was just a guesstimate on my part before I removed the pads. When I removed them, there was probably 3-4 mm of thickness left. How do you know how much more is actually left before hearing squealing or damaging the rotors? Did I change them too early?

You can run them till no pad left, but 1mm left is the recommend change interval, but yeah 3 or 4mm, they still had 20,000 mile left.

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Thanks, I'm going to measure the old ones with calipers tonight and compare to another set of new ones I have.

Another question: Was I stupid to put medium thread locker on the pad pin threads before torquing to 18 N.m? I did grease the pin well...

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I went through my brakes yesterday at 23k and was surpised to find out that the front left outside pad was past the wear groove on OEM pads and the next thinnest had 60% left, rear left.

All the pins were just about corrosion free, the slide points weren't munged up and all the pistons slide into the caliper really easy. I replaced the L F pair.

New OEM have 4.3 mm of wear before out of spec.

I surprised of the wicked uneven wear. Maybe I should check rotor run-out, you think ?

The Nissin calipers are NICE, easy to work on, good spring set-up, etc, compared to the calipers I have been playing with for quite some time from across the other pond.

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Thanks, I'm going to measure the old ones with calipers tonight and compare to another set of new ones I have.

Another question: Was I stupid to put medium thread locker on the pad pin threads before torquing to 18 N.m? I did grease the pin well...

Yeah I wouldnt lock tight the pins, heat and corrison could cause freeze up.

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In my mind I confused what I read about the caliper bolts. Oh well, I used the medium and sparingly. As a follow up, the new EBC HH pads had two (2) pads of friction material, while the old ones I took off had four pads of friction material on each pad. Probably OEM vs. EBC. Performance-wise, it's like putting on a set of new tires...I can't believe how much braking power I was lacking on the old pads! One or two fingers now and all is good!

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  • 11 months later...

Need help verifying actual pads to install. Never had this issue with any other vehicle. Installing brake pads on 98 VFR and pads too thick, won't fit on rotor. Local Honda dealer parts dept sold me the following:

EBC Brakes, Double-H, Superbike, Streetsport & Race Formula, FA261/2HH

Are these the correct pads?

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  • Member Contributer

Those are correct for a 6th gen...don't know about a 5th gen. Push in the pistons with a pry bar and the old pads?

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Local Honda dealer originally sold me incorrect pads. FYI, correct for 98 VFR: EBC FA261HH.

fa 261hh is the correct rears for 6th gen from EBC also. But you originally receiced fa1261/2 , wonder what they fit?

a month or so ago, my rear pads were worn, I had an old set with a few mms left, so Installed. Forgot that id done this, and sunday after riding spun my back wheel and skreech scheerch, I was down to the rotor, Oh crap. caliper was hot and so was the rotors. Had to get ebc, no one had stock. I did install the heat insulators from stock pads, ebc doesnt come with them,

Anyway, when I took the pads off, I had maybe , ,0002ths of pad left, and the rotor was just kissing in one small small spot, that was enough to make everything super hot though, evidently. I guess the thickeness of the pads also effect heat build up.

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  • 7 months later...

So question about changing the brake pads. My stock pads came with a metal bracket attached to the inner pad on each side. I didn't realize this until I was cleaning up. What is this, how important is it, and should I dive back in and attach it to the new pads?

post-23488-0-19857200-1402113103.jpg

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  • Member Contributer

So question about changing the brake pads. My stock pads came with a metal bracket attached to the inner pad on each side. I didn't realize this until I was cleaning up. What is this, how important is it, and should I dive back in and attach it to the new pads?

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Which pads did you install? EBC pads have them .

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