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Yet Another (BUDGET) Street Fighter Build


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3 hours ago, Captain 80s said:

 

Looks like somebody repeatedly dropping them down in the driveway upside down on the stacks.

 

 

I can see that. Maybe they “worked” on the carbs upside-down on their driveway. You know, for a solid base. 

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I have already received flak from quite a few people, some in private messages. Your disapproval is just that, and is absolutely not the way I see this project. I want to create something that FOR ME

I really don't think this particular bike is beautiful, but I have seen some 93's that are! Additionally, there is no resale value as it has a salvage title, it's 30 years old, the frame is oxidized,

The body work is shot as RC said, the lowers are held on by bug guts...   There are plenty of nice streetfighter'd VFR's...    

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Hopefully it will add .001 horsepower through turbulence, like the dimples on a golf ball for extra loft during flight.

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loving this build, I just bought a 3rd gen to do a street fighter. Thanks for the details about the fork installation, Im definitely doing that. Whats your thoughts for exhaust? Going under tail? Cheers from Australia.

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I thought about undertail, but as the title says BUDGET, I think I will just go with a shorty pipe. Also most undertail exhaust bike are known for roasting your arse.

 

I am at a standstill for the moment as big storms are rolling through, and my garage is packed with bikes, tools, and a car. Work is off the hook busy as well, so overtime will help with any parts I may need to buy. Still waiting for some machine time to get the headlight bracket made.

 

Post progress of your work, and don't be afraid to ask the collective for help - it's like having a super computer at your disposal!

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You've already got your wiring sorted, but I came across a recent video for rewiring that might be generally helpful to others. Maybe. Some helpful tips if you have 20 minutes. The guy talks mostly of rewiring cars, but includes bikes in his approach. I didn't ask for linking permission...so if there's a problem, we might hear about that too.

 

 

 

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Not much action lately as work has been really busy, and I picked up some side work as well. Also the weather has been crummy, for CA at least.

 

 I did buy a 5th/6th gen rear wheel, and will notch it to fit, then powder coat it gloss black. To me the 3ed gen wheel look is lost a bit on a street fighter, but the square-spoked 5/6 gen looks tough. Also if they ( 3rd gen rear wheels) are not white, they don't POP, and they are hard to come by these days. Actually the neon green one on Brian F's old bike had plenty of POP!

 

I bought a few trick parts for the red bike project as well, but I won't get started on that until the street fighter is done!

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Had a little free time today, so I washed the wheels, as I don't want to get grease and grime in the sandblaster at work. The original and the Ebay wheel had to soak with simple green, as the back sides of the spokes had never been washed. I will post up the wheel mod, as soon as I can get to it.

 

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Hey, looking good!!  

 

be careful about soaking any bare metal in Simple Green for too long...

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Yep, etches it right up, same as citrus degreaser...

 

Both bikes wheels' have corrosion, from brake dust, and being left outside for years on end...

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Be extremely careful with the stuff. Dilute it lots and never leave on for too long!

 

Simple Green doesn't just etch, but causes hydrogen-embrittlement and outright dissolves metal. Discovered this about 20-years ago on bicycle-racing forums where chains soaked in Simple Green comes out cracked with pieces missing!!! When I brought this up to Simple Green, they added warning on their website:

 

https://simplegreen.com/industrial/faqs/

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However, caution and common sense must be used: aluminum is a soft metal that easily corrodes with unprotected exposure to water. The aqueous-base and alkalinity of Simple Green All-Purpose Cleaner can accelerate the corrosion process.

Therefore, contact times for unprotected or unpainted aluminum surfaces should be kept as brief as the job will allow - never for more than 10 minutes. ...

Simple Green has also developed break-through water based cleaners that are safe for use on metals, plastics, rubber and high tech alloys. Extreme Simple Green Aircraft & Precision Cleaner, Pro Series Simple Green Automotive Cleaner, and Simple Green Pro HD are available on both the industrial and retail markets, respectively.

 

U.S. Army, Air Force and FAA discovered same (planes and helicopter falling out of sky) and issued orders forbidding its use on aircraft.

 

http://www.chinook-helicopter.com/maintenance/issues/cleaners/cleaners.html

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/parts-washer-solvent-recommendations.811853/#post-9010627

https://crc.army.mil/MediaAndPubs/magazines/flightfax/2005_issues/ffnovdec05.pdf

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It has been brought to the attention of the AMCOM Depot Maintenance Engineering Team that numerous units are using the commercial product “Simple Green®” as an aircraft wash. STOP! This product has been through DoD testing and was determined to be highly corrosive on aircraft aluminum. It can also be a catalyst for hydrogen embrittlement in high strength aircraft alloys. While it’s a highly effective cleaning agent for floors and non-aluminum/non high-strength alloy vehicles, this product is not approved for aviation usage. If your unit has been using Simple Green® on a regular basis, it is recommended a thorough freshwater wash with the approved cleaners per the appropriate airframe maintenance manuals be accomplished as soon as practicable. This should be followed by a corrosion inspection / treatment and application of approved corrosion prevention compounds.

—POC is Richard Cardinale.
He may be contacted at DSN 861-4041 (361-961-4041) or e-mail corrosion@amcomcc.army.mil.

https://crcapps2.crc.army.mil/warrior_stories/warrior_story.asp?lessonid=2004930-42

https://forum.miata.net/vb/showpost.php?p=925384&postcount=1

http://www.avweb.com/newswire/news0020b.html

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It's Simple -- Don't Use This To Clean Aircraft

 

A well-known aviation magazine this month published a feature article on cleaning one's aircraft and getting it ready for spring flying. Only one problem -- a product the article recommended as safe for aviation use has been proven corrosive to aluminum. The product is Simple Green, a popular household cleaning liquid. According to the magazine's May issue -- which included a photo of Simple Green and other products -- the liquid "does an admirable job for a fraction of the cost of the aviation cleaners." While that may be true as far as it goes, both the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Army have conducted tests of Simple Green and strongly urge that it not be used to clean aluminum structures. In one test conducted by the U.S. Air Force, results from which were published in 1989, aluminum alloy samples were immersed in Simple Green for a week then removed, cleaned and weighed. The results indicated that the approximately 3.5-gram aluminum alloy samples experienced a material loss of about 31 milligrams in a diluted solution and a whopping 295 milligram loss after spending a week in the undiluted liquid. The Air Force report summed it up this way: "We do not recommend the use of this product on Air Force equipment containing aluminum." Good advice, that.

 

 

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Wow, did not know it was that aggressive...any other suggestions for heavy duty cleaning off years worth of stuck-on-crud?

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WD-40 is my go to for chain goo. I generally used simple green also for cleaning. I never let it sit on a part as it was spray, scrub, and rinse. I didn't know about how bad it could be either.

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One of things learned in my o-chem classes was "like dissolves like". Personally, I think it's futile to make an aqueous (polar) solution try to dissolve non-polar compounds (oil & grease). A polar solvent works much better. Yeah, I like WD-40 also, or kerosene.

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