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4 hours ago, bdouvill said:

 

Are you sure the RR will not be in contact with the tail fairing? At least, this sounds more elegant than my own version 😉

 

Yes, I actually did several test fitments, unlike some other parts.  There is probably 1/2" of space all around it.  I don't know what the M8 holes in the subframe that I used were for from the factory, my guess is for hanging side bags or a trunk since this was considered a sport touring bike.  I however will never be adding those things so using these mounting points is a no brainer, so much more room.

 

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Hello all, great forum, first post!   Inspired my damionj's post on his 1992 model (thanks man), I decided I should contribute and put up a post on my 91 since I also got it from someone who

Merry Christmas everyone.  Some updates on motorcycle fun stuff.   Got the electrical all sorted 100% now.  I had a few things to address, specifically wiring new R/R to battery, adding an a

While replacing front sprocket I noticed the tell tale signs of a leaking clutch slave cylinder so decided to just go ahead and order rebuild parts.     Here's what improper maint

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Them holes provide a perfect fit fit the GIVI Wing rack yes.

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Nice job on the bracket and upgrade. When you install the new r/r do you use thermal paste? The cooling fins are obvious, but I wonder if paste is still helpful. Like on computer chips...

 

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On 12/14/2020 at 3:49 PM, DannoXYZ said:

Then couple years ago, I saw used Ninja-250 race-bike going for next to nothing. Its lightness and responsiveness bumped me off wall I've been sitting on and it's been just a blast racing

 

Everybody says the little Ninja's are loads of fun on a track. The guys have a pretty good website too, not just for ninja's but for general rider information. Nothing like VFRd. Nonono, nowhere near as good as this. 😉 But maybe worth a look. It's here:   https://forums.ninja250.org/

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4 hours ago, Gebruiker said:

Nice job on the bracket and upgrade. When you install the new r/r do you use thermal paste? The cooling fins are obvious, but I wonder if paste is still helpful. Like on computer chips...

 

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I thought about it but no. I did make sure the aluminum plate was relatively flat for maximum surface contact with the back of the R/R for good thermal conductance. I think the design of the MOSFET R/Rs negate having to add the thermal paste as they run cool enough as is. Good question though. 

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On 12/17/2020 at 1:47 AM, Dutchy said:

Them holes provide a perfect fit fit the GIVI Wing rack yes.


Thanks for confirming, I can see now the knock out pieces on the plastic fender for when you mount luggage,  still in place on this bike.

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Merry Christmas everyone.  Some updates on motorcycle fun stuff.

 

Got the electrical all sorted 100% now.  I had a few things to address, specifically wiring new R/R to battery, adding an auxiliary battery connection for charging, accessories and monitoring voltage.  Also the neutral circuit / light was not working when I got this bike....the engine would not run in neutral with the side stand down, which it should.

 

Wiring the new R/R connections and adding an aux cord is very straightforward.  Keeping the new connections on the positive and negative posts on the battery close together, everything facing forward, no modifications are needed to the battery lid and it fits nicely over everything.  There is a fuse holder with a 7.5a fuse in it for the aux power cord directly in front of the battery and in easy reach.  The 30a circuit breaker for the R/R is mounted outside the sub frame.  A couple of pics:

 

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The battery power cord is run to the front of the bike where it is just tied off to the front fairing frame, you can either use it or tuck it away.

 

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And the neutral circuit issue turned out to be the clutch diode.  I had read many other posts about the neutral light coming on when pulling in the clutch to shift gears and the problem being the clutch diode, but I had not seen my issue where the light never comes on and the bike doesn't know when you are in neutral thus allowing things like the bike idling in neutral on the side stand.  The diode itself tested good, but the act of removing and reinstalling the diode a couple of times must have cleaned up the 30 year old connections and it all magically started working.  I put it back together for the last time with some dielectric grease added.  I actually went through and inspected all of the major easy to get to connectors on this bike and I am happy to report that none of them were burnt or visually corroded, they all were in pretty good shape....added dielectric grease to all of those connections as well.  Here's a pic of the clutch diode and its location on the right side of the bike:

 

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I also repacked the Yoshimura muffler with a kit I bought.  It has a combination of stainless steel screen and steel wool, then a layer of ceramic insulation blanket.  Here are some pics of the disassembly, repack and assembly.  7 of the 8 screws that hold this all together came right out, 1 of them I had to cut a slot in with a Dremel and #409 cutting wheel and then use a flat blade screwdriver, right angle for torque.  Also, a couple of shots of what I am sure was the factory packing material:

 

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A sturdy padded jaw bench vise helps a lot with both disassembly and assembly of the can.  Mandatory is a soft-faced dead blow hammer.  Optional is heat, I recommend it as it helps get the end caps off and the whole thing apart.  I used a propane torch and just barely kissed the ends of the cans with a soft flame never discoloring the metal or getting it visibly hot.

 

PLEASE DO NOT BURN YOUR HOUSE DOWN OR USE A PROPANE TORCH NEAR CHILDREN OR ANIMALS.

 

I think a heat gun for removing paint would do just as good of a job.  The following pics include tools for both methods.

 

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Here is the repacking sequence.  Not shown is that I added an additional 3-4” ring of ceramic blanket inside the end of the can nearest the engine to completely fill the can with blanket:

 

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Finally some elbow grease and that Mothers shine was added to the can and mounting strap.  I also removed the burnt up fiberglass band that was inside the mounting strap where it touches the muffler and replaced it with a strip of 1/16" silicone rubber that I cut to width and length.

 

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And before you think the "Made in U.S.A." on the label of the Yoshimura exhaust system is BS, those are 1/4-20 thread screws holding the end caps on and not a metric size.....I know because I decided to purchase some new ones because I didn’t have the correct ones.  🇺🇸

 

Thanks for reading and helping out everyone! 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is the thread I'll now reference if I ever get around to repacking my yoshimura. Thank you for the detailed tutorial!

 

Was the original packing...assuming it was original...also steel wool wrapped with ceramic? It appears to be only ceramic or glass fiber wrapped with foil. Maybe? Also, you wrapped the ceramic blanket with blue tape (your picture below)? Is that some kind of super heat tape that comes with the rewrap kit? It doesn't look permanent. Do you then remove that as you slide the entire package into the can, or do you leave it in place, expecting it to just char once the exhaust warms up?

 

As for your final product...now I know what mine is supposed to look like. 😁

 

IMG_5768.thumb.jpg.572461bff96c407492b8ee394f1ffc5e.jpg

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On 12/26/2020 at 12:30 PM, jefferson said:

Nice job, looks like new.

 

Thank you, I see you are a ZRX owner as well, a 1999, the best year!

 

The VFR will look good for a 30 year old bike that has had a hard last 5-10 years.  No major damage to body work, quite a few small dings or paint touch ups.  The goal is to ride the bike, then see where to go with it next. 🤷‍♂️

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Are you on the ZRXOA. Lots of good info there like any good forum with a lot of die hard enthusiasts. Lots of activity which I like. I have done mine up as a proper Eddie Lawson replica. Kawasaki painted it the wrong color green in my opinion.

 

The VFR is my first Honda and I think I got a pretty good one. Time to start the modding since winter is here.

 

 

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On 12/27/2020 at 9:46 AM, Gebruiker said:

 

This is the thread I'll now reference if I ever get around to repacking my yoshimura. Thank you for the detailed tutorial!

 

Was the original packing...assuming it was original...also steel wool wrapped with ceramic? It appears to be only ceramic or glass fiber wrapped with foil. Maybe? Also, you wrapped the ceramic blanket with blue tape (your picture below)? Is that some kind of super heat tape that comes with the rewrap kit? It doesn't look permanent. Do you then remove that as you slide the entire package into the can, or do you leave it in place, expecting it to just char once the exhaust warms up?

 

As for your final product...now I know what mine is supposed to look like. 😁

 

IMG_5768.thumb.jpg.572461bff96c407492b8ee394f1ffc5e.jpg

 

Hey Gebruiker,

 

Yea I remember you were interested in some pics when I opened up the Yoshi so I'm glad you asked any questions.

 

To answer, I am thinking the packing I removed was from the factory, it had that very neat well manufactured look to it.  And it was all one material, looks like some sort of fiberglass wrapped completely with what I would call old school masking tape, it's what people used before the blue stuff came along.  It was wrapped 100% end to end.  When I put mine together I saw no need to wrap the whole thing so I just used the 3 strips of regular blue painters tape to hold it together and I left it in place and slid the whole thing in the can expecting the tape will just get dried out.  It's only purpose here is to hold the blanket in place.

 

If you use this same kit for your exhaust I can also offer up the following additional things I discovered.

 

It is a universal kit and the instructions do say to cut the different layers of material to length and diameter for your application.  For the screen and steel wool, you will need to cut the pieces both lengthwise and some off the diameter too for it to fit nicely on the perforated pipe.  Tech Tip: the steel wool can be hard to cut and will send little pieces of metal everywhere that you don't want to get in your skin or eye, have a nice contained place when you cut the steel wool and clean up well.  Also, do not use your wife's kitchen scissors for cutting the steel wool, it will dull them!  The kit also came with some 304 stainless tie wire, if you look closely in the pics you can see I just made a small loop on one end then you used it to anchor the wire wrap along the screen and steel wool sandwich, they give you just enough to tie off at the other end if you space it out just right.

 

Also it is important to note here because everyone on the Internet could be reading this right now......the screen and steel wool used here are not the standard hardware store variety, it is stainless and manufactured with a process that does not use oil so it is not combustable - very important.  Do not use material not designed for the job or you may regret it.  Don't burn anything or place down.

 

For the ceramic insulation blanket, you will not want to cut any off of the length or diameter.  They give you just enough to make one wrap around the steel wool with about 1.5" overlap, leave all of it.  And don't cut anything off the length of the blanket either or you will just have to add it back on like I did, no big deal either way, just make sure to fill the can completely without overly compressing the blanket.

 

Good luck with your project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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30 minutes ago, jefferson said:

Are you on the ZRXOA. Lots of good info there like any good forum with a lot of die hard enthusiasts. Lots of activity which I like. I have done mine up as a proper Eddie Lawson replica. Kawasaki painted it the wrong color green in my opinion.

 

The VFR is my first Honda and I think I got a pretty good one. Time to start the modding since winter is here.

 

 

 

Yes on ZRXOA, what a bunch of crazies over there.  Yes, a very good active forum.

 

I need to see a pic of your bike now, everyone does!

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On 12/24/2020 at 6:47 PM, mtnpat said:

Merry Christmas everyone.  Some updates on motorcycle fun stuff.

 

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That looks fantastic (and I'm sure sounds the same).  Nicely done.  Thanks for posting. 

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7 hours ago, DannoXYZ said:

How's it sound after repacking? What's different?

 

Can you post link to repacking kit? thx


I have not run the bike since repacking the exhaust can. The next time will be when I sync the carbs, I’m waiting on a warm day here in Northwestern VA. to do just that.  Can’t wait to hear it. 
 

I hope we are allowed to post links, let me know if not.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00ED8QTJ6/ref=ppx_yo_mob_b_track_package_o0_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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On 12/28/2020 at 1:10 PM, DannoXYZ said:

How's it sound after repacking? What's different?

 

If you follow up on this mtnpat, I’m interested too. 🙂

 

Yoshimura actually recommends repacking at least once a year(!). Seriously? I wonder how many of their customers follow that schedule.   https://www.yoshimura-rd.com/pages/repack-and-insert-chart 

 

 

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On 12/28/2020 at 11:19 AM, mtnpat said:

 

Yes on ZRXOA, what a bunch of crazies over there.  Yes, a very good active forum.

 

I need to see a pic of your bike now, everyone does!

Well there aren't any pictures of the ZRX on this computer and the SD card with them on it now has an error. The computer they were loaded onto has been shelved when we bought this one because it was bad. I'm going to see if the pictured can be retrieved off of it.

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Happy New Year, hope all is well.  I got some more things completed, I'm very close to the last step - tires.

 

Meanwhile, out in the garage (driveway) I synchronized the carbs which was the step before fixing the gas tank which is right before tires.

 

I find the idle speed screws on the VFR750 uniquely hard to reach compared to other 4 cylinder bikes including my Honda ST1100 V4.  Basically on this quartet of carbs the screws are on the bottom.  And actually not that hard to get to at all if you have the correct tool, which I bought.  With a 90 degreee extended-length screwdriver you can reach into the valley and adjust the idle screws as necessary to sync the carbs, I like this tool because you can fit it with a 7mm socket to adjust the screws, this makes for a nice positive engagement between tool and fastener which is what you need when you are trying to adjust something you mostly can't see.  TIP: use a mirror to get a good look at where the screws are so you know what you are shooting for when reaching in there.  I was able to adjust the VFR carbs very quickly, all 4 banks very close together.

 

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And my preferred tool for measuring how synchronized the intake pulses are on a V4 is by using an air flow meter and measuring in kilograms per hour the flow rate of the air passing through each carb.  This is different than the traditional method of measuring vacuum from a small port at the base of each intake runner.

 

Here are some old vacuum style mercury-filled carb sticks, they work so-so:

 

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And here is a home made vacuum style sync tool using transmission fluid as the medium.  It works very well for the ZRX where you sync 2 carbs at a time then sync the 2 banks together.

 

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Here is what I used for the VFR.  It simply tells you how much air is being sucked into the intake.  Using this you get an easy to read, repeatable measurement, you just move tool from one velocity stack to the next, takes like a second.

 

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I still so far have only run the engine using an auxiliary gas tank and a gravity feed so far, this because of the rust issues with the tank.  Plus you need an auxiliary tank anyway when using this method.

 

And as far as the sound from the newly re-packed Yoshimura muffler....hard to tell how sweet it will be because well so far I have only run the bike in the driveway hooked up to a gasoline IV, RPMs from 1k - 6-7k.  I will say it sounds quieter than it did with the blown out fiberglass insulation packing.

 

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Speaking of rusty gas tanks, I really couldn't procrastinate any more on seeing if I could save the tank.  As it turns out I could.  I used distilled white vinegar, filling the tank and letting it soak so the mild acid could attack the rust.  Total soak time was ~48 hours.  I used the method found at the following link and it did the job. 

 

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/how-to-clean-rust-out-of-a-motorcycle-gas-tank

 

I will list what ended up being my steps, maybe it will help someone as well:

  1. remove fuel filler assembly
  2. remove petcock and fuel level sending unit
  3. add block off plates to cover up petcock and sending unit holes
  4. prop tank up level and fill with 5.5 gallons of white distilled vinegar
  5. let sit for 24 hours
  6. use manual or electric fuel pump to drain 4.5 gallons from tank leaving 1 gallon
  7. add 2 cups of small rocks to tank, keep them marble size or smaller, you don't want to dent your tank
  8. tape the tank filler hole closed, degrease and use Gorilla tape for this, works great
  9. take tank outside over some soft grass and shake like crazy
  10. turn tank on all sides and shake some more
  11. sit tank down and rest 5 minutes
  12. come back and shake some more
  13. use gloves or whatever you need to do to hold onto tank and NOT DROP IT
  14. bring tank back inside and prop it up level again, remove Gorilla tape from tank opening
  15. add back in the 4.5 gallons of vinegar you previously pumped out
  16. let sit for 24 hours (again)
  17. use manual or electric fuel pump to drain 4.5 gallons from tank leaving 1 gallon (again)
  18. repeat shaking process from steps 6-10 above
  19. use manual or electric fuel pump to drain remainder of vinegar from tank
  20. starting at the next step you want to work fast as you can to keep new rust from forming so have your stuff ready
  21. turn tank on side or top and remove both blank off plates
  22. go outside near your garden hose and put down a big piece of soft cardboard or a blanket, something that can get wet and can catch your tank if your drop it, but don't drop it, it also comes in handy for having something soft to sit your tank on while working on it outside, you could use soft nice soft grass too
  23. take tank outside and rinse for 2-3 minutes with a garden hose, washing out all of the vinegar and as many rocks as possible, I found most came right out the petcock mounting hole
  24. have 2 large pots of hot water ready mixed with a small amount of Dawn dishwashing liquid in each (to neutralize acid from vinegar), heat to ~140 degrees, so hot but not boiling or even scalding hot)
  25. use a large funnel to dump one of the large pots of hot water + Dawn dish soap into tank, shake, shake, shake and rinse tank out, repeat immediately with the second pot of hot water + soap.
  26. pick tank up and shake out as much water as possible
  27. take tank back inside and get a hair dryer going pumping a large volume of hot air through the tank, entering the filler neck and exiting the petcock and fuel sending unit holes
  28. the combination of using hot water and then the hot air dryer will help get the inside of the tank to dry quickly preventing a bunch of flash rust from happening
  29. pick tank up periodically and shake out any water settling then turn tank over and put back in front of hair dryer
  30. repeat step 29 a few times, it took less then 30 minutes to completely dry out my tank after all of this
  31. shake tank and try to get out the 4-5 rocks that are still in the tank, cussing helps here, eventually I was able to get each of the few remaining rocks out by shaking them forward in the tank, turning tank over and grabbing them with a long pair of hemostats through the fuel sending unit hole
  32. at this point since I was choosing not to coat the inside of the tank with any kind of liner, I used an engine cylinder fogging oil to spray the crap out of the inside of the tank using long applicator wands and all 3 holes in the tank to access everywhere inside.  I also over the next couple of days turned the tank on its sides and top for a few hours each to let the oil creep into all cavities and locations.  Again, have something nice and soft (don't scratch or damage your tank) but disposable to put your tank on when working on it inside, especially for this step, it makes a mess.  I put what I consider a lot of the spray fogging oil into the tank, by a lot I am guessing 1/4 can or less, so a lot but you are not filling the tank, you are coating the walls to prevent rust.

 

That's it basically, 32 easy steps.  The fogging oil if you used enough will leak out the bottom of the tank for a couple of days so don't bring it in the house or over any carpets or anything like that!

 

I don't plan to run the bike using the gas tank and fuel pump for 3-4 months so I am leaving this coating of oil in the tank for now.  Before running the bike in the Spring time I will use some gasoline to wash most of the oil out of the tank then I should be good to go with normal use of riding the bike and keeping the tank full of fresh gasoline as much as possible, I don't expect appreciable new rust in the future.

 

Here are some before and after pics using both my iPhone and a endoscope:

 

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So not perfect and I'm sure more could have been done with different methods but perfectly useable.  Here is a shot with the fogging oil added:

 

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So the tank is back on the bike after many months, all polished up and shiny.  Not much left except replacing the 12 year old tires and getting the body work back on it.

 

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Here are a couple of pics from the whole de-rust / vinegar process.  I recommend a LARGE funnel for filling tank with vinegar and then at the end with hot water, hard for even me to mess things up.  In use here is an automotive radiator funnel.  Also seen is a pic of my 12v inline fuel pump I used to remove vinegar from tank at a few of the steps, it made the whole process very easy.  A couple of other random pics including one showing the mess the oil will make in the last step so be warned.

 

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I think I will wrap it up here for now.  I have some other minor stuff I can share later.  Good luck with your projects everybody.

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It sure looks like you got almost all the rust out of the gas tank. In spite of all that work you've done, do you expect to use an extra fuel filter? Maybe something pretty big to collect random leftover bits of rust that might be hiding, but still allow fuel to flow. I'm just wondering if it'll take a while before there's no more risk of contamination...and I'm wondering if a standard fuel filter would be up to the challenge. Or does the fogging oil create a permanent sealant barrier inside the tank?

 

 

 

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On 1/13/2021 at 3:00 PM, Gebruiker said:

It sure looks like you got almost all the rust out of the gas tank. In spite of all that work you've done, do you expect to use an extra fuel filter? Maybe something pretty big to collect random leftover bits of rust that might be hiding, but still allow fuel to flow. I'm just wondering if it'll take a while before there's no more risk of contamination...and I'm wondering if a standard fuel filter would be up to the challenge. Or does the fogging oil create a permanent sealant barrier inside the tank?

 

 

 

 

The vinegar really did a good job of dissolving the rust so no plans to run an extra fuel filter as I really don't expect there will be many flakes or chunks breaking loose.  I understand where you are going in that I do want a large semi-transparent fuel filter to check for contaminates and blocking....good thing Honda already designed one into the bike!  The stock style filter should work well for filtering anything out and it's my only filter because I do not have one in-tank.  I am going to keep an extra filter under the seat though!!

 

The fogging oil is just oil protecting the raw steel, it will wash away once filled with gas the first time.

 

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Fitting body panels back on the bike.  Having to repair and glue a few places, touch up the red paint which isn't easy.  Also put a coat of black on dash surround pieces because they were badly stained and not looking too good.

 

Tires soon, saving for dead last, I bought a set back in October when I found a good sale.

 

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Oh and the new R/R is working great!  14.5v at start up with a brand new battery (charged but never run), then settled down to a steady 13.8-13.9v.

 

Bike was not charging at all when I got it and had no battery.

 

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