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Hi there, finally realized a dream and bought my 8th gen (2015) 

it’s the getting acquainted faze and firstly 

I’m trying to bring it to my style of riding tho as a rider who spent most of his years on sports bikes (except for once owning a 6th gen for about a year) I realize this bike can be more fun if I adapt my riding style to it . 
would really appreciate some suggestions of the correct way for putting it on its center stand without damaging my already herniated back 😌🤷‍♂️😁.

 

5D8BA965-4169-400E-9535-E42787C9ED33.jpeg

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Welcome to VFRD!!!

 

I'd say the trick is placing your weight on your right foot on the centre stand.

Practise a few times perhaos with a "helper" on either side to guide you along to build confidence. Pulling is no good.

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Agree on the back thing...make sure ground is level...put a pair of boots on, you want that rigid sole, put all your weight on stand and find a spot to grab on and pull up at the same time, I grab frame right above passenger foot rests.   It’s a challenge.  I found getting my old ST100 easier to get up on stand...had a swing out handle to lift from.

 

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Welcome! I too have a very screwed up low back- riding actually decreases my pain. I gave up my centerstand when I installed new headers but remember how difficult it was to get the bike on the stand. Now i have a Pitbull rear stand but it is actually more difficult to use than the centerstand. I agree with the above- wear sturdy soled shoes, have a helper, level concrete and I pulled on the handlebars which worked for me. Good luck!

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

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Welcome to the asylum Aspon from The Land Of Interesting Weather. You obviously have great taste in mc's.

 

Take care and ride safely.

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Thanks for all of the good advices, used it all plus some back/forth shaking and it sure made a difference 😎🤘🏻
 

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5 minutes ago, Aspon said:

Thanks for all of the good advices, used it all plus some back/forth shaking and it sure made a difference 😎🤘🏻
 

Yay! (from fellow lower back cripple)

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13 hours ago, Aspon said:

Hi there, finally realized a dream and bought my 8th gen (2015) 

it’s the getting acquainted faze and firstly 

I’m trying to bring it to my style of riding tho as a rider who spent most of his years on sports bikes (except for once owning a 6th gen for about a year) I realize this bike can be more fun if I adapt my riding style to it . 
would really appreciate some suggestions of the correct way for putting it on its center stand without damaging my already herniated back 😌🤷‍♂️😁.

Hi Aspon.

Congratulations with your purchase. Assuming it has relatively low mileage and well maintained it will be a great bike. The 8gen is a very reliable bike, with a much improved electrical system and better fuel economy over the previous 6gen, along with numerous other enhancements.

I also use the pannier case spike above the pillion foot rest as a right hand grab point, the other hand on the left steering grip, and as already mentioned always use firm soled shoes like your riding boots. Important to lower the stand then rock your bike slightly to positively establish the two feet of the stand are in contact with the ground, with as straight a back as possible try and transfer your whole body weight to your foot while adding a bit of pulling arm action rearward and up she'll come. A bit of practice and you'll realise you don't need to be Hercules to pop it on the centre stand.

Enjoy your new ride and Welcome to the forum, there is a lot of good stuff here for the reading on the 8gen.

Cheers.:beer:

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I agree with everything Grum says and would emphasize the need to establish that the two feet of the stand are both in contact with the ground. I also echo his suggestion to place all of your body weight on your right foot.  The trick with bikes with center stands (I've owned 20 bikes with center stands over the last 57 years of riding) is to come to the realization that you're not really supposed to lift the weight of the bike UP, you're using your body weight with a LEVER (the center stand) to press the center stand DOWN while you are guiding (okay, pulling) the bike backwards so that it can rock upward on the curved legs of the center stand.  Some bikes are more optimally balanced for this:  I have a BMW R1200RT that weighs a hundred pounds more than the VFR but it is easer to put it on its centerstand.  Keep practicing putting your bike up and down on the centerstand (preferably on a level, concrete floor, at least at the beginning) and once you get the feel of it, it'll be a piece of cake.    

 

I'm new to the VFRD Forum myself but it's full of great and helpful information.  Mine is a 2015 VFRD that I bought new at the end of 2018.  .

 

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, McZen said:

I agree with everything Grum says and would emphasize the need to establish that the two feet of the stand are both in contact with the ground. I also echo his suggestion to place all of your body weight on your right foot.  The trick with bikes with center stands (I've owned 20 bikes with center stands over the last 57 years of riding) is to come to the realization that you're not really supposed to lift the weight of the bike UP, you're using your body weight with a LEVER (the center stand) to press the center stand DOWN while you are guiding (okay, pulling) the bike backwards so that it can rock upward on the curved legs of the center stand.  Some bikes are more optimally balanced for this:  I have a BMW R1200RT that weighs a hundred pounds more than the VFR but it is easer to put it on its centerstand.  Keep practicing putting your bike up and down on the centerstand (preferably on a level, concrete floor, at least at the beginning) and once you get the feel of it, it'll be a piece of cake.    

 

I'm new to the VFRD Forum myself but it's full of great and helpful information.  Mine is a 2015 VFRD that I bought new at the end of 2018.  .

 

 

 

 

And a warm Welcome to you McZen. Great lot of suggestions you've added to centre stand ops.

Hope your 2015 is the fast Red one.:wheel:

Enjoy your ride - The 8gen is a gem.

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3 hours ago, McZen said:

I agree with everything Grum says and would emphasize the need to establish that the two feet of the stand are both in contact with the ground. I also echo his suggestion to place all of your body weight on your right foot.  The trick with bikes with center stands (I've owned 20 bikes with center stands over the last 57 years of riding) is to come to the realization that you're not really supposed to lift the weight of the bike UP, you're using your body weight with a LEVER (the center stand) to press the center stand DOWN while you are guiding (okay, pulling) the bike backwards so that it can rock upward on the curved legs of the center stand.  Some bikes are more optimally balanced for this:  I have a BMW R1200RT that weighs a hundred pounds more than the VFR but it is easer to put it on its centerstand.  Keep practicing putting your bike up and down on the centerstand (preferably on a level, concrete floor, at least at the beginning) and once you get the feel of it, it'll be a piece of cake.    

 

I'm new to the VFRD Forum myself but it's full of great and helpful information.  Mine is a 2015 VFRD that I bought new at the end of 2018.  .

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the tips and I second your impression from this Forum 👍 lots of good helpful info and nice people that actually take their time to share their experience 😎.

enjoy your new “family member” 😎🏍

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Congrats on your 8th gen!  I used to have a tough time and was nervous getting the bike on its centerstand, but the tips above work.  I still get a little nervous putting the bike up, but it's much easier now.  But I also get a little nervous pulling the bike down from the stand, unless I'm on it, but I don't get out it first most of the time.  Just takes a firm grip really.

 

Anyway, cheers on your VFR and welcome to VFRD!

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