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R&G Frame Sliders - Installation Guide


BonemanVFR
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Also available here on BonemanVFR.com: http://www.bonemanvf.../rgsliders.html

Cost: $170.00 CAD (+ shipping)

Purchased: http://www.rg-racing.com

Manufacturer: R&G Racing

Mod Time: 3 Hours

Part No.: CP0073

Frame sliders were the first mod I ever did to my FZ6 and I figured I should also do them to my VFR. I did some research on various different brands and mounting applications and settled on the direct mount R&G frame sliders. These had good reviews from fellow VFR owners and I like the fact that they are directly attached to the engine mounting rod, which should hold up better in the event of a tip over. The R&G sliders also came with a new coolant overflow/fill bottle that has been modified to allow access to the engine bolt that is hidden behind the OEM bottle.

With the R&G sliders you will have to drill/Dremmel a 1 1/8" hole in each side faring in order to install and mount them. This turns away a lot of people from purchasing these sliders, but I will walk you through some of the do's and don'ts of installing these sliders and you will find out that drilling isn't that bad after all.

The R&G frame slider installation instructions (PDF) can be found here and on R&G's web site. R&G's "3D Installation Guide" does not really apply to this model of frame slider.

First things first, remove the left and right body work and set aside. Your first step after that is going to be replacing the OEM coolant overflow/fill bottle with the new one supplied with the frame slider kit. Remove the OEM bottle and drain out the coolant into an container, then attach the R&G bottle and reconnect the hoses and pour the coolant back in.

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OEM Bottle

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R&G Bottle

Here are the components of the R&G frame slider kit:

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x2 Bobbins, X2 spacers (1 short, 1 long), replacement threaded engine rod, x2 Ny-lok nuts, x2 washers

Undo the nut on the right hand side of the OEM engine bar and remove nut. Then using the R&G bar, push the existing OEM bar out the left side at the same time sliding the R&G bar in.

gallery_21132_5842_43359.jpg

Now comes the fun! You need to mark the engine rod's location on the inside of each side faring. I used some wall tack putty and pressed it on the inside of each faring in the area of where the rod was going to make contact. This is going to give you the location of where to drill/dremmel your holes so take your time.

Fit one faring on and loosely secure it with one or two of the faring bolts, then from the opposite side, use a hammer and tap the rod until it makes contact with the faring on the opposite side. I used vise grips on the rod (no on the threads) to wiggle the road back a bit so it wouldn't continue to contact the inside of the faring and mess up the mark it just made in the putty. Remove the faring and inspect the rod mark in the putty.

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Left Side Faring

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Marked rod location and center punched

You will now notice that the location of the holes are probably in the worst possible spot on the entire faring! Use a center punch to mark the center of the rod's location and drill a small pilot hole (1/8" - 1/4"). Then re-fit the faring and check that you can see the center of the rod in the pilot hole.

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Now this is where I differed from the instructions a little. The R&G instructions and web site say to use a 28mm holesaw drill bit and even offer it for sale on their web site. So I bought one from Home Depot. After examining where the hole location was on the faring and all the complex contours in the area of where the hole needs to go, I came to the conclusion that there is no friggin way this 28mm holesaw bit was going to work!!! It was just going to make a mess and shred the crap out of my faring. So I opted to use my Dremmel with a grinding bit that did the job perfectly!

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28mm Holesaw bit...no f'ing way!

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Dremmel rotary tool - the only way to go for this job!

This process involve a lot of going slow and re-fitting and checking of each faring. My steps were:

1. Get the hole big enough so that the rod can fit through and refit the faring and secure faring with one or two bolts so that it is in the correct position.

2. Slide on one of the spacers onto the protruding rod and trace/mark it's diameter onto the faring

3. Un-mount the faring and continue Dremmeling away the material.

4. Take your time and keep re-checking. Once the hole is large enough for the spacer to fit through, STOP! That's as big as you need the hole to be.

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The "Hole" - Careful not to cut away the join in front of the rod!

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You can see why a Holesaw drill bit would not work

Now you can refit your faring's (loose or fully re-mount them).

The last step is to attach the bobbins onto the rod. This is where R&G instructions fail to provide you with some information of how this procedure ACTUALLY works. In their instructions, they very simply state, "Place washer and nut on either end and tighten bolt until you feel some compression from inside the protector. Turn a little more so that you feel the compression increase slightly.". Well one problem with that simple instruction... As you are attaching 2, Ny-lock nuts, one to each end of a threaded rod that freely spins, you will need TWO 19mm sockets, one on each bobbin, because as you tighten one Ny-lock nut, when the nylon thread portion starts to bind on the threads of the rod, it just spins the entire rod, so you don't end up tightening anything. So I ended up leaning across my VFR so I could grab each ratchet attached to the 19mm sockets and hold one nut steady as I tightened the other one. I alternated back and forth so each nut would thread into the rod evenly.

Final results

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Very pleased with the final resultes and once the bobbins are in place, it is hard to even see the cut holes.

The only down side I can see to this mod is that you now have to remove each slider/bobbin if you want to remove your body work. So it's an added pain in the hoop to an already annoying experience of removing the VFR body work.

And remember, if you get stuck, don't be afraid to call for help and bring in the big guns!!!

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- Boneman

Edited by BonemanVFR
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Nice writeup Bone. I like your use of putty to mark the hole, seems easier than the paint meathod reccomended by R&G that I used. I also wrapped my RH spacer with an old piece of radiator hose because it was very close to coming in contact with the coolant hose right there. Now it IS in contact but it's with another piece of rubber instead of a harder piece of metal that would rub through the hose. Good job getting a helper, never hesitate to ask for help when needed :goofy:

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  • Forum CEO

The no hole saw thing can be worked around, I like Radars solution he has a couple of bobbins you insert into the frame, drill pilot holes from the opposite side through the bobbins for perfect alignment - one side at a time. then place a long rod through the bobbins and attach the hole saw to the rod and finish the holes off with the rod as your guide no mess no mistakes. I dont like the mushroom designs though with the skinny end bolted to the frame. I broke off two of them like that snapped right off. The non taperd design is much better, with a wider base to spread the load onto the frame, they dont snap so easy and slide more.

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I will no doubt be referencing you guide very soon! I've only ever dropped the bike in the driveway once, but that was all that it took to convince me a couple holes in the fairings were worth the added protection.

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  • 1 month later...
Guest Westn

Cant really tell from the pictures but do you need to cut the under side of the fairing for the mushroom section of the slider or is the whole mushroom section clear of the fairing?

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Cant really tell from the pictures but do you need to cut the under side of the fairing for the mushroom section of the slider or is the whole mushroom section clear of the fairing?

The "mushroom" section of the slider is not in contact with the fairing, it's close, but no touchie.

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Guest Westn

Good write up by the way.

I dont like how some done mushroom and you see the hole, by the look of it the mushroom covers most of the hole. The R&G stick out a fair way but should give good protection.

Dont know if mushroom is the right term but you know what I mean.

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  • Member Contributer

It was my understanding when I installed these on mine that these are more for a tip over than anything. I could be wrong though. There was a few pics of a bike floating around here quite awhile ago that showed the the slider snapping off and going right into the side of the fairing that had been involved in a low side. I'll see if I can dig up the thread.

EDIT: Found the thread with the pics. Not much but best I can do for ya. http://www.vfrdiscussion.com/forum/index.php/topic/54276-fairing-slider-options/page__hl__snapped

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Most "frame sliders" are not stout enough or well enough mounted to withstand the abuse of an actual crash from what I've seen. I belive they are actually meant to snap off to protect the frame from severe damage but thus not protecting the fairings or cases so much as they are cheaper and easier to replace or repair than a frame. IMO nothing short of a fairly stout cage is going to properly protect the fairings and other various bits that stick out and hit the ground first, drawback is that they ARE stout enough to transfer much more energy into the frame and possibly saving all the little bits and trashing the frame.

It's a tradeoff of what you want to protect, best option is to not down the bike :laughing6-hehe::goofy: I'm a short bastage, I installed mine for the extra security in the event of an occasional tip over, and they work great for that, ask me how I know............................... :pissed:

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  • Member Contributer

Good write up but I have never seen set of these help on a low side. I wish somebody would post pix's and show me how they help .

PA210104.jpg

This was tossed down the track at about 100mph, and slid to a stop on tarmac. No damage to radiator, fuel tank, or frame.

A year prior to this crash, a 25mph low side without frame sliders resulted in a damaged radiator, tank, upper fairing, and scratched frame = bike totaled.

  • Like 1
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Good write up but I have never seen set of these help on a low side. I wish somebody would post pix's and show me how they help .

PA210104.jpg

This was tossed down the track at about 100mph, and slid to a stop on tarmac. No damage to radiator, fuel tank, or frame.

A year prior to this crash, a 25mph low side without frame sliders resulted in a damaged radiator, tank, upper fairing, and scratched frame = bike totaled.

I sit corrected. Damn, is that an R&G????

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  • Member Contributer

Good write up but I have never seen set of these help on a low side. I wish somebody would post pix's and show me how they help .

PA210104.jpg

This was tossed down the track at about 100mph, and slid to a stop on tarmac. No damage to radiator, fuel tank, or frame.

A year prior to this crash, a 25mph low side without frame sliders resulted in a damaged radiator, tank, upper fairing, and scratched frame = bike totaled.

I sit corrected. Damn, is that an R&G????

It was

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  • Member Contributer

Is there anything similar available that are easier to install that would provide enough protection just from the bike being dropped?

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Guest Westn

Good write up but I have never seen set of these help on a low side. I wish somebody would post pix's and show me how they help .

PA210104.jpg

This was tossed down the track at about 100mph, and slid to a stop on tarmac. No damage to radiator, fuel tank, or frame.

A year prior to this crash, a 25mph low side without frame sliders resulted in a damaged radiator, tank, upper fairing, and scratched frame = bike totaled.

Thats unreal. :ohmy:

They didnt snap.... Quality!

Heard a lot of people saying no slider will last a high speed tip.

Everyone thinking about them should now have their mind made up

Thanks for the post.

I would have a set but their not going to fit with the torocharger, the kit uses the RHS mount required.

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Guest Westn

Is there anything similar available that are easier to install that would provide enough protection just from the bike being dropped?

A few brands make sliders like this:

post-21903-0-51891000-1305708688_thumb.j

But a lot of guys think that because of the weight distribution of the bike, in a tip these will cause the nose of the bike to dive harder into the ground causing more damage.

If you want the best (IMO) "no cut sliders":

Oggy Knobs http://www.promotomelb.com/results.php?Brand=HONDA&Model=VFR800%20VTEC&Year=2007

post-21903-0-57658400-1305709243_thumb.j post-21903-0-64288100-1305709578_thumb.j

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Is there anything similar available that are easier to install that would provide enough protection just from the bike being dropped?

A few brands make sliders like this:

post-21903-0-51891000-1305708688_thumb.j

But a lot of guys think that because of the weight distribution of the bike, in a tip these will cause the nose of the bike to dive harder into the ground causing more damage.

If you want the best (IMO) "no cut sliders":

Oggy Knobs http://www.promotomelb.com/results.php?Brand=HONDA&Model=VFR800%20VTEC&Year=2007

post-21903-0-57658400-1305709243_thumb.j post-21903-0-64288100-1305709578_thumb.j

My real question with these has allways been how much force can they take before punching a hole in that nice purdy spensive radiator they're in rather close proximity to...........

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  • Member Contributer

My real question with these has allways been how much force can they take before punching a hole in that nice purdy spensive radiator they're in rather close proximity to...........

I would think, not much. HPS brand were of a similar style - no cut needed, but had a bracket that was at least supported on two sides.

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  • 1 year later...

Ordered today. hope they come quickly.

Boneman, which bit is that on your dremmel?

So you make a hole first with a drill bit first and then switch to the dremmel to expand the hole. is that correct?

Thanks for the DIY... that's all I needed to make up my mind and go for it.

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  • Member Contributer

I've gone through several sets of Radar's sliders (blush). In every case I have judged that damage would have been worse w/o the sliders. The ultimate result will vary with the situation. They have broken off, bent, or just worn down but served their purpose well. And I've been down at some scary speeds. I went through both right and left sliders at T-mac. (double blush).

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I've gone through several sets of Radar's sliders (blush). In every case I have judged that damage would have been worse w/o the sliders. The ultimate result will vary with the situation. They have broken off, bent, or just worn down but served their purpose well. And I've been down at some scary speeds. I went through both right and left sliders at T-mac. (double blush).

what you gonna do now that Radar's no longer available?

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I've gone through several sets of Radar's sliders (blush). In every case I have judged that damage would have been worse w/o the sliders. The ultimate result will vary with the situation. They have broken off, bent, or just worn down but served their purpose well. And I've been down at some scary speeds. I went through both right and left sliders at T-mac. (double blush).

what you gonna do now that Radar's no longer available?

That was one of my first questions to myself after my crash.

At first I figured I'd just have to stay upright. Now, with this thread, it's upright and these sliders. Ya know - just in case! ;-)

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