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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/25/21 in all areas

  1. Ferry to S.F. was U$18,50 one-way. I got monthly pass for U$335. Ends up about same as commuting - $6 bridge toll across Bay Bridge or Golden Gate Bridge - $5 bridge toll back to North Bay - $10 petrol/car-maintenace Ferry is more relaxing, has food, and has nice views along way. Richmond-San Rafael bridge Bay Bridge to Oakland Two Brothers islands
    3 points
  2. ...everything ends up at an oil thread, you just have to be patient!
    3 points
  3. The only large car ferry I've been on was the one from South Baymouth to Tobermory, Ontario. I was doing my tour around Lake Huron and decided to take the ferry instead of riding around Georgian Bay. Between getting to the terminal early to assure I'd have a spot, waiting for the ferry, the 2-hour trip, and disembarking, I probably didn't save that much time. But it was nice to relax on the boat, get some rest during a long day of riding, and get a hot meal onboard. This boat had a full kitchen and even a gift shop. The day was overcast and the trip across the water was cool and misty. Really neat experience. I included a few photos below. This was the first time I ever had to tie my VFR down, and all they had was some twine rope. I was a little worried but it was fine. The water was fairly calm and the boat was very steady. But after that episode I bought a set of decent tie-downs in case I ever need to take a ferry like that again on a tour. Two other car ferries I've been on (sorry, no photos): There's a small ferry that crosses the Ohio River between Fly, OH, and Sistersville, WV. It fits several cars. I've been on it once or twice. It's a very short ride, is pretty cheap, and does save some time traveling further to one of the bridges that cross the river. But mostly it's just kind of cool to be sitting on or standing next to your motorcycle on a floating platform in the middle of a large river. I almost took the ferry just for the fun of it during my last SE Ohio ride, but decided to skip it. Maybe next spring. Kanadian Ken and I took a very small ferry from Ontario to NY state during a tour around Lake Ontario. It was tiny. I can't remember where it was exactly, but it was on the NE side of the lake and saved us a bunch of time vs. riding east to the next bridge to cross over. It's a very short ride. When you get to the other side, as soon as you roll off the boat you're basically at the border patrol shack. What made this crossing more memorable for me was how much of a prick the US Border was, the first and last time that's happened to me.
    3 points
  4. This one stood idle (in a dry garage) for 5 years. Prior to committing $$$ to refurbih, I wanted to see if she'd run at all. Checked the oil (level, color and any smell of gasoline). Cranked a few times without actually starting the engine and then.......
    2 points
  5. Although I too live on an island, it is a decent size at 113,000 square km (thanks Google). My ferry journeys have been limited to a harbour crossing to Waiheke Island with my scooter (and wife). Waiheke is in one of Auckland's harbours (the Waitemata) and full of vineyards, holiday homes and rich pricks (apologies to anyone here who lives there). You get there on what can only be described as a landing craft, with a lowering bow door that grinds up onto a ramp at each end. The Vespa was a blast two-up on dirt roads! Other short crossings have been in the Bay of Islands at Opua; a very short hop that avoids a tortuous coastal road, actually a fabulous ride on a bike if you have the time/energy. The ferry is as small as it looks but the journey is only 10 minutes. Not too far from there is the Hokianga Harbour, and there is another small ferry crossing from Rawene to Kohukohu. This one also cuts out a very windy coastal road. I crossed this one on a big day return trip to Cape Reinga; it was nice to take a short break. The biggest ferry crossing here is between the two main islands of New Zealand, between the imaginatively-named North Island and (wait for it) the equally creative South Island. Not far as the crow flies, but 3-odd hours in a large ferry that also hauls freight trucks and railway wagons. Getting on this ferry is very exciting for a northerner like me, as the South Island is a bit larger, much emptier, and geographically wild, which means mountains and rivers unlike the North, and epic, epic riding. They insist that you tie the bike down well, the crossing over the Cook Strait can be very wild indeed. In 1969 a similar-sized ferry ran aground and capsized in a storm with significant loss of life...
    2 points
  6. That's more like what I was looking for in my pics folder. I think we can file it under "design flaw"... Ciao, JZH
    1 point
  7. Lake Champlain, leaving Burlington VT. My riding buddy Markus is the hat and sunglasses in front of my 6th gen, and his FJR (I think, he changed bikes frequently). The blue bike in front is some v-twin, can't quite make out the brand... P.S. I have taken the Peel Ferry on my VFR a half dozen times. Double points to anyone on VFRD who can identify where the hell it is. (it is in the lower 48)
    1 point
  8. Lots of great replies & photos. The map below shows the routes I use, with Vancouver and Seattle also highlighted to get your bearings. Terry: at 31,000 sq km, Vancouver Island is about one quarter the area BC Ferries have wooden blocks to prop your bike - but no tie-downs, at least on the routes I use. Black Ball Ferry's MV Coho offers rope to tie your bike up - weird, I know. Both routes are around 25 mi/44 km and 90 minute voyages, though only the Coho is an international trip. They both cost about the same: US$38 / Cdn$49. The Coho sails for 2 to 4 round trips per day, while BC Ferries run 2 vessels totalling 16 round trips per day.
    1 point
  9. Definitely low. I don't like the high mounts on the VFR.
    1 point
  10. How did this devolve into an oil thread?! Not that I'm innocent here.
    1 point
  11. Speaking of ferries... I used to take one to S.F. for work... about 60-minutes. Much better than 2.5-hr commute by car.
    1 point
  12. A somewhat shorter 8km ferry ride to Magnetic Island off Townsville. I had an argument with the loader because he was pissed off that I didn’t park where he told me too next to the railing (I was worried that the wind would whip up the salt water as the waves hit the side of the ferry, as it turned out I needn’t have worried no spray at all) He kept going on about balancing the ferry and he was the boss ect ect, he actually threatened to refuse me return passage. The ferry isn’t that small, there was a passenger who I think weighed more than my bike who was walking around quite freely without capsizing the boat.
    1 point
  13. To take my mind of the gloom of late fall, how about a show & tell about ferry travel? Living on a (largish) island necessitates a ferry trip anytime I head off for a trip. Mostly I take the MV Coho from Victoria, BC to Port Angeles, Washington. That route is more convenient when I head to America, but the journey via BC Ferries to mainland BC at Tsawassen is more scenic. The Coho is the smallest of the ferries I travel on; 340 feet long and carries 110 cars & 1,000 passengers & crew. BC Ferries' Spirit & Coastal class vessels are over 500 feet in length, and carry up to 350 cars and 1,600-2,000 passengers & crew. MV Coho leaving Victoria harbour: Looking northwest to Vancouver from the retired Queen of Saanich: nearing Tsawassen ferry terminal aboard Spirit of BC, with the Coastal Celebration and Queen of New Westminster (sister to Queen of Saanich) docked in the background: looking back towards Vancouver as we enter Active Pass between Galiano Island on the left(north) and Mayne Island to the right:
    1 point
  14. This thread from the recent past has some photos of a seriously grenaded starter clutch, below . . . not sure if that's been ruled out by now. The OP began another thread looking for a replacement for his '86, but I don't recall seeing the outcome if one was ever posted. Hopefully that's not the issue in this case. https://www.vfrdiscussion.com/index.php?/forums/topic/99151-86-vfr750-changed-starter-clutch-now-bike-just-backfires-and-wont-run/#comment-1128681
    1 point
  15. SM, why do you always mix this up? The starter clutch is on the right. Your method first of all would be hard to work on the bike on that side (against a wall) and a shitte tonne of oil would come pouring out. Having the bike on the side stand will suffice (leaning to the left).
    1 point
  16. Range is definitely a concern - 5 gallons? If I can go 175 miles, I'm good... ... wanting to see a CycleWorld testing and also a S1000GT vs NT1100 vs Tracer 9 test by the same. It will all shake out come spring... Or... just screw it, grab one of these, the dash is gorgeous. I sat on it, didn't find the ego's for me all that bad... As a design, I think its beautiful. A purpose designed fighter jet.
    1 point
  17. No your motorcycling days aren’t numbered , they are on hold . One day it will bite again , harder , bigger , you won’t be able to fight it. Your older now , the rules no longer apply , you can do what you like . The young ones will snigger and maybe even laugh at your old bike and you in the out dated leathers that are no longer in fashion. But it’s ok , your the crazy old man now with the bikes , you smile to yourself knowing one day they might ride as well as you . But right now your off on another one of your trips wondering where the road is taking you this time , no hurry , no rush , camping gear on board , you have months to figure out where you will end up , tonight you don’t even know where your staying , another crazy ride doing what you thought you would never do at your age , way to young to spend the days playing golf like the kids want you to , you can do that when you can’t pick the beast up any more. You say there numbered , you can hear it coming while having coffee , inline four , aftermarket pipe , you knew it was a 1000rr ……..no just on hold for a bit.
    1 point
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