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Hello all, great forum, first post!

 

Inspired my damionj's post on his 1992 model (thanks man), I decided I should contribute and put up a post on my 91 since I also got it from someone who also basically said "just take it".  This bike also was not the worst bike I've seen, its a great 10 footer, it just needs a lots of love and work to get it back on the road again.  My buddy bought it at auction I'm thinking about 5 years ago and never did anything with it, I think he might have rode it once, then it remained in the back of a garage behind 3 Harleys, I think a quad and probably a couple of tractors.  He told me several times he was not riding it because the petcock leaked, I tried to help him suggesting we rebuild the petcock or eliminate it and put an inline one in, still the bike just sat and sat and sat some more.  Finally one day he was like "come get it, Happy Birthday" (it was close to my birthday), so I did.  Here it is back at my house.  He knew I would do the right thing with it because I have worked on Japanese bikes for 35+ years.  Thanks Bro!!

 

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I will tell you, if it wasn't a red Honda V4 motorcycle I would have taken a pass, I really didn't need another motorcycle.  But I REALLY like red Honda V4s.  Here is a pic or two of my 1996 ST1100, best bike I have ever owned, 102,000 miles on her (bought it with 16k miles), rides and turns corners like a dream.

 

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As I said, I really like the color....so much so I bought a 1998 Jeep last year in what I have always called "Honda red".

 

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Other bikes currently owned include a ZRX1100, a Kawazuki 434 and the SV650 which is my wife's.

 

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Now onto the VFR!  The bike has 36k miles on it, did not run when I got it.  It's a nice complete bike with from what I have seen from tearing into it, not too many ham-fisted mechanics have had their hands on it (thank goodness), but there has definitely been some racer boy action going on.  Note the Brembo brakes and Yoshi pipe, also take a look at this.  First pic of airbox lid.....I think the person couldn't decide if it was rich or lean :-).  The second pic is the heat shield between the fan/radiator and the intake/carbs, I'm guessing they were trying to get more air to the carbs, but it would just be hot air (hence it being a heat shield). Oh and the tank bra....that was the second thing I took off right after the fork leg covers (hate both of those things).  Also the PAIR system was disabled but not removed, bolts or electrical tape to cap off hoses.  With all that said, the rest of the bike is in good unmolested condition, I can and have fixed all of this already.

 

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Other immediately noticed issues included an overfilled crankcase (all oil, no gas)....first pic shows the oil I drained out with the correct amount in the left jug and the "extra" in the right.  The second pic is of course some crudded up carbs....this is exactly how I found them with one of them clean the others dirty with I'm not sure what, the crud turns too powder when you rub it between your fingers.  More on the carbs later.  Finally a bone dry gas tank with rust :-(.

 

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With all that said, I love the bike.  I mean its a Honda and I really like the brand.  The VFR is a completely uncomplicated version of my ST and I like that.  The ST has a 16 valve V4 with gear-driven cams, sounds awesome.  It also has ABS, traction control, anti-dive fork and linked braking.  Oh and a driveshaft and differential.  The VFR is like working on a Jeep to me as compared to working on the wife's Suburban or my Subaru.  The VFR is just so simple compared to the ST, a much racier version.

 

Here is the immediate list of things the bike needed just to be a bike:

 

* tires

* battery

* gas tank rust repair

* new petcock and fuel lines

* new voltage regulator/rectifier

* carb cleaning and parts

 

Add to all that the things it needs to be safe and me actually ride it:

 

* inspect, flush and bleed brakes and clutch, replace as necessary

* replace sprockets and chain

* inspect wheel bearings front and rear

* inspect suspension and headset bearings

 

I have probably 30 more pictures I can post of the restoration efforts I am making on this VFR (we all like pictures, right?), for now I will just put up one more of how the bike looks today, 5 months after I got it (only been working on it for about 2 months, very part time).

 

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Short story is that I have completed a lot of stuff already (not just stuff on the list above), have run the engine twice with a remote gas tank, changed oil, adjusted valves, gone completely through the brakes.  Inspected and cleaned bike front to back (mostly).  The major list of things left to do include:

 

* mount and balance tires

* synchronize carbs

* repair gas tank

* finish fuel system lines

* inspect wiring and install new R/R

* install sprockets and chain

 

Well if you made it this far thanks for reading.  I will follow up with more details of the repairs to this VFR soon and as I get it back on the road where it should be!

 

The plan is to keep it pretty much the way it is now, keeping the Brembo calipers and full-floating rotors, keeping the Yoshi, keep the rest of the bike as stock as possible.  Definitely want to go completely through the front and rear suspension, upgrade and tune for my weight and riding style.  I'm in no hurry, just working on the bike as I have spare time and want to hang out in the garage.

 

-mtnpat

 

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Good read, sounds like you’re having a good time 

 

Before you abandon the OEM petcock you might want to try soaking the 3 way O ring in Wintergreen solution, there may be a rebuild kit for it

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NRP in the UK sells rebuild kits.  You have to drill out the rivets, tap and fit screws--easy job.  If you have enough o-rings in different sizes, you don't need the kit, but the measuring's done and the material is correct.

 

The rusty tank is a bit worrying.  Might be easier to just buy a clean one.  

 

Otherwise, looks like a great restoration project!

 

Ciao,

 

JZH

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Thanks for the interest guys and the replies about the petcock issue.  As it turns out I am missing parts from the stock petcock so I made the decision to just use it as a place to attach the fuel line to the tank, but not use it to shut off the fuel.  I found what I hope is an inline petcock that fits nicely and I believe based on my measurements will provide enough fuel flow.

 

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And since the stock 29 year old fuel lines were hard as a rock and cut or broken (and not available anymore), they had to be replaced with something else.  I went back and forth on whether to use a Tygon style clear hose or an automotive OEM style rubber hose.  I ended up going with the rubber style because I have had hit and miss success with Tygon hose in various colors.  I think I am finished mocking up the new petcock to pump and from pump to carbs lines and I think it will work out nicely, just need to get some more clamps of the style I like and also protect the fuel line as it goes inside the frame and secure things.  The curved piece of hose where it does a 180 and connects to the petcock is part of one of those molded cut-it-yourself hoses in 5/16" ID.

 

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I will be doing a comparative flow rate test from a)direct from petcock on the tank, and b)from the outlet of the inline petcock.  The fluid path changes from a 7mm ID right at the tank petcock, to ~6-6.5mm as it goes through the petcock.  With a fuel pump I don't think this will be an issue.  I want adequate fuel flow though so am checking.  Unfortunately I don't have a complete stock petcock to test, only the one I have with all the guts and internal tank filters gone.

 

 

 

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Oh and for the rusty gas tank....I'm hoping it isn't too far gone and can be saved, the outside of the tank is in very nice condition.  I have 6 gallons of distilled white vinegar, gonna fill tank and see what happens.

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After the vinegar treatment have a look at the electrolysis videos on YouTube for the final cleaning 

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Great story; keep up the hard work to get this one back on the road !

 

Dazed, please elaborate (copy link?) to what you refer on the "electrolysis videos" and how do they apply to rusty tanks?

Thanks.

Brian

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As I mentioned previously, since bringing the bike home and working on it I have run the engine twice, and it sounded good!  Started right up with choke, idles nicely off choke.  Carbs need syncing but I was impressed with how well it revved before being synced.  To get here though before ever trying to fire the bike, I did first check and adjust valves, clean and re-jet the carbs.  The exterior of the carbs were not bad, the internals were only visibly dirty in the float bowls (floats, jets, needles & seats).  I also did a compression check which was all good, adequate pressure and all 4 cylinders were within 10% of each other.

 

Carbs were found to have all stock jet sizes, 130 mains and 40 pilots, aftermarket needles with the front two carbs set different than the back two as far as needle clip position.  Float levels were good on 3 out of 4, had to adjust 1.  Pilot screws were all over the place, all 4 set differently.  The float needles were not worth saving but the seats were ok.  I bought four new size 132 mains, four new 40 pilots also, float needles, pilot screw o-rings and bowl gaskets.  I went with the 132 mains as a starting point  because I have yet to own a Japanese bike that was not lean with the factory settings so I will start with the 132s.  All four needles were set the same at the third clip position as a start and the pilot screws all set to 2 turns out.  So all four carbs set exactly the same.

 

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The aforementioned carb heat shield was replaced with a piece of kydex the exact same thickness.  This part is also not available new from Honda and all of the used ones I found were for a different generation and not the same.  I did not do an exhaustive search, after looking at it long enough I figured I would just replace it.

 

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Luckily new valve cover gaskets and rubber washers ARE available from Honda because I did not like the condition of the ones on the bike when I removed the valve covers to check valve clearances.  All valve clearances were checked and only 1 out of 16 was out of spec and only by 1 thou.  I ended up adjusting 2 intake valves bringing them both back close to middle of spec.  I didn't have the size valve shims I needed so I also ordered those from Honda.  I prefer purchasing from Honda or other Japanese bike manufacturers because you can get the shims in .025 increments instead of .050 from aftermarket companies, this allows for setting clearances more precisely.

 

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Also since not knowing anything about the condition of the engine when getting the bike, I also cut open the oil filter to check for anything metal or shimmery looking, nothing found which is good!  From the start my plan was to not put more money into the bike than absolutely necessary until I knew more about the condition.  Even though the bike didn't cost me anything I could tell immediately that it would take $1000+ to get it back on the road and I did not want to say go buying tires if the engine is in bad condition.  As it sits right now I am moving forward with fixing or getting everything back in good shape with the exception of any suspension upgrades, I first want to ride the bike and more fully check out the engine and gear box.

 

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 More on things like wheels, tires, brakes and drive chain later.

 

 

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On 11/17/2020 at 7:24 AM, Thumbs said:

After the vinegar treatment have a look at the electrolysis videos on YouTube for the final cleaning 

Thanks for that suggestion, I will definitely take a look.  This is a project for me and more cool things like this to check and do makes it fun.

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While talking about carburetion I should probably mention that I closed up those holes that were drilled in the air box lid with some Gorilla tape on the inside (love that stuff!) and some black electrical tape on the outside just for looks.  I really don't understand why you would drill holes here anyway because from what I am seeing the tank and tank insulation fit snugly on top of the air box, not exactly an area to freely get more air to the carbs (which were probably lean anyway, but I can only guess, now that I think about it I really don't want to know).  Anyway, here are some pics!

 

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Also important to being able to test and tune your air-fuel ratio is to not have vacuum leaks :-).  The PAIR system was disabled but not removed with some really sketchy work to block everything off.  I removed everything, put proper rubber nipples on intake runner ports, also cylinder head block off plates were added.

 

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Finally, while talking about carbs we should probably talk about the throttle cables.  You want to make sure they move freely and smooth.  I used my cable oiler to add some silicone spray lube into and through the cables.  Also cleaned up was the throttle tube to handlebar interface.  Everything is working nicely now.

 

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On 11/17/2020 at 1:10 PM, mtnpat said:

The aforementioned carb heat shield was replaced with a piece of kydex the exact same thickness.

 

Is kydex the material they use on original heat shields? It looks like good stuff to have around. Apparently it can be shape molded and used for all sorts of things. Best of all for me...it's inexpensive!

 

Have you figured out why half the air intake was taped?

 

I'm having fun looking at your progress. Your bike came with some of the opposite issues that mine had. And it's good catching up. Thanks for posting.

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On 11/21/2020 at 4:40 PM, Gebruiker said:

 

Is kydex the material they use on original heat shields? It looks like good stuff to have around. Apparently it can be shape molded and used for all sorts of things. Best of all for me...it's inexpensive!

 

Have you figured out why half the air intake was taped?

 

I'm having fun looking at your progress. Your bike came with some of the opposite issues that mine had. And it's good catching up. Thanks for posting.

 

Hello Gebruiker,

 

Thanks for the kind words.  I'm not sure what type of plastic was used for the original heat shield but I think the Kydex brand of plastic I used is a more modern composite.  Kydex is super strong, drill-able, easy to shape and one of the key features is that it is easily heat molded.  It is used to make modern (non leather) pistol holsters and knife sheaths.

 

As far as the intake, I would guess someone was doing some tuning.  It is not unreasonable that if you want to check and see if you are running lean to block off part of the intake and see if a more rich fuel mixture is what is needed, I just think their execution was poor, doubt it did anything.  I'm running wide open snorkel !!

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One of the things on my list for this new to me bike was to CLEAN it, I only own one other full-fairing bike and I forgot how dirty the frame and components get under all of that body work.  When working on things I tend to clean as I go, but then you make a clean spot and end up spending the next 3 hours with a rag and some cleaner and sore the next day.  I knew the VFR was easy to work on, just unclip the fuel filter and the entire rear fender assembly comes out with 4 bolts.....(makes cleaning easier).  A lot of the work was cleaning up old chain grease while changing to new sprockets and chain.  Ended up taking the shifter and side stand assemblies off the bike to clean them because they needed a more serious degreasing.  Bike is pretty clean now.  Will just need to clean, wax and polish the plastics and tank when that all goes back together.

 

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Am I imagining things or did you put a clip master link on your new DID chain? 🤔

It sortof looks like it from your pictures. No judgement from me. But some folks think a riveted link is the only way to go.

 

And your buddy will be wanting the bike back when he sees the job you've done. How did you polish up the aluminum bits of the frame?

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10 hours ago, Gebruiker said:

Am I imagining things or did you put a clip master link on your new DID chain? 🤔

It sortof looks like it from your pictures. No judgement from me. But some folks think a riveted link is the only way to go.

 

And your buddy will be wanting the bike back when he sees the job you've done. How did you polish up the aluminum bits of the frame?

 

Indeed - that is a DID CHAIN 520 VX3 CLIP TYPE MASTER LINK.  When I took that pic I noticed that the black master link really stood out and instead of rotating the chain I left it as is to see who was paying attention - good job.  I feel that a properly installed side plate and clip style is just as secure as riveting, it is a very positive fastener.  I can only go by my personal experience, but in 35+ years of using them on everything from old school dirt bikes, KTM trail monsters, assorted 400-1000cc street bikes, I have never had an issue.  If you think about it there is not a large side load on the link and again that steel clip is very secure.  I would love to hear others experiences.

 

For raw aluminum there is nothing better than Mothers.

 

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Brakes only slow you down!

 

So this bike was bought at auction with no contact with the previous owner, so what you see is what you get.  This bike came with the stock front brakes minus the master cylinder and lever assembly in a box.

 

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Instead it had a set of Brembo 320mm rotors and Goldline calipers with matching axial master cylinder installed.  The lever feel when I got the bike was horrible, very short and firm, seemed like it would not provide good feel or modulation.  Good thing I wasn't planning to just ride it.  I flushed the system then removed the calipers from the fork to make it easier to inspect their condition and operation.  Turns out other than a lot of brake dust they were in good shape.  Pads were good, just needed grooves cleaned out, all the fastening hardware cleaned and everything put back together.  I also gently pushed the pistons back in the calipers about 1/4" just to see if they would move freely and they did.  Put everything back on the bike, flushed and bled system and now the lever feel is quite good!  I like it.  I also sanded and painted the brake fluid reservoir cup lid because it was in bad shape from fluid leakage.  It does appear to seal correctly and is not leaking, I think it was just some lazy sloppy mechanic behavior.  I will watch for any leaks when I ride the bike but I already bought one of those sweat band looking covers.

 

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One of the interesting parts of this bike for me is the full-floating rotors, this is new to me.  These calipers are not floating so the rotors have to be.  When I first pushed the bike around the driveway to load it on the trailer I thought there was something broken in the fork because when I would hit the front brake I could hear something loose, I thought it was a spring issue.  Turns out it was the rotors and this is normal.  The rotor design looks the same as my other bikes, the ZRX for example,

but that bike has floating calipers and non-floating rotors, the same two piece connected with buttons design though.

 

Here is the ZRX, non floating and 6 buttons:

 

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And the Brembo's, floating, 12 buttons:

 

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When you grab these rotors you can move them with your hand.  Anyway, pretty cool I guess, supposed to be lower drag and full race.

 

Here is good video showing the results of the two types of systems - 

 

The rear brakes are all stock and in good enough condition for a couple of test rides.  I did go through them the same as the front,  cleaned them, inspected condition and flushed and bled the fluid. I can see a new rear rotor and a set of pads in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Looking real good!  Nice work.

 

Been riding, racing, building motorcycles for over 35 years.  NEVER had a master link clip fail.  I used to safety wire and put a smear of black silicone to keep the Tech Inspectors happy.  On o-ring chains, MANY people can't set up the chain the right way to accept the clip properly.  So lawyers got involved and chains no longer ship with them.

 

I have had to keep an eye on some dirt bike chains that move thru a guide and rub the sides, as the nylon and dirt and water will start to put a knife edge on after a while.

 

I've seen some BUTCHERED rivets too.  Some people just shouldn't work on their bikes, regardless how long they have been "learning".

 

Anyway, nice progress.

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1 hour ago, Captain 80s said:

Looking real good!  Nice work.

 

Been riding, racing, building motorcycles for over 35 years.  NEVER had a master link clip fail.  I used to safety wire and put a smear of black silicone to keep the Tech Inspectors happy.  On o-ring chains, MANY people can't set up the chain the right way to accept the clip properly.  So lawyers got involved and chains no longer ship with them.

 

I have had to keep an eye on some dirt bike chains that move thru a guide and rub the sides, as the nylon and dirt and water will start to put a knife edge on after a while.

 

I've seen some BUTCHERED rivets too.  Some people just shouldn't work on their bikes, regardless how long they have been "learning".

 

Anyway, nice progress.

 

Thanks Captain, I appreciate the input and feedback.

 

I know a lot of people think riveting a master link is the only safe way to secure the side plate but I don't think so.  With either you still have to press on the side plate and as you said not everyone has the skill to rivet with the proper security and tension.....you can end up with a too loose or too tight link if not done correctly.  The clip reduces that variable.

 

And I have seen the same thing on dirt bikes where a chain guide or other rubbing can wear down the edges of a clip, should keep an eye on those.  That's why we do maintenance.

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Using a small press where the posts that accept the clip can pass into, I over compress the link a touch to ensure the clip groove is fully exposed.  I have an old-school chain breaker that I can then clamp on and push the link back thru, pressuring the installed clip slightly into the face of the chain link plate.  Not going anywhere.

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21 hours ago, mtnpat said:

I feel that a properly installed side plate and clip style is just as secure as riveting, it is a very positive fastener

 

 

I can't comment one way or the other. My experience is like yours. I've never had a clip master link fail on a bike, but I've only ever used them on smaller bikes. And they sure are convenient. It seems to me one of the more experienced, not to say um courageous? VFRd members, Dutchy, once took a bike from the Netherlands to Sweden(?) without even the clip installed on his chain and lived to tell the tale. But I may not be remembering the story quite right... 😁

 

If DID is even selling a clip link for its chains, then they must have some faith that kind of design security. 

 

Also, Mother's Aluminum polish. Got it. Thanks. I'll look for it next time I'm in a polishing mood. 

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