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My 399 lb VFR848

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On 4/22/2018 at 3:57 AM, VFR Capt.Bob said:

Very very nice. I have a very similarly modded VFR. I was thinking where is the big bore kit then realized the 848 designates the rear hub mod.

Love this bike.

20171015_090153.jpg

 

Hey Capt Bob, you have a nice bike as well. 

What Brembos are they and where did you get an adapter. 

Even better, can you post a close up of your front brake set up both sides 

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Good job and excellent narrative... you have gone quite a bit beyond the point
where most of VFRD would in modifying their ride...

 

A lighter motorcycle will generally perform better due to a superior
power to weight ratio and because, all else being equal, a lighter
motorcycle will generally handle better than a heavier one. In
motorcycle mods, lighter weight is associated with advanced
technology, good design, and more expensive and exotic materials,
while a motorcycle whose weight is greater than expected can be
perceived as lacking these most desirable qualities...

 

I hope you would be interested in doing a weight and balance with a common
bath room scale... the numbers could be a bench mark and show Honda their

VFR customers are serious about weight loss...

.

 

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On 4/9/2018 at 3:40 AM, gig said:

 

Kit from Extremecreations they did "Keef's 1098 conversion, shim and spacer worked the same for 848 eccentric 

IMG_4772.thumb.jpg.ec7a688e232d1f67dccb9236cd51b4e0.jpgIMG_4810.thumb.jpg.09c18ea53c7a49a5b1bd7a0c56d321c1.jpg

 

The 848 brake hanger is open vs 1098, so milled flat for clearance and used TI domed bolts to secure. The brembo master i had to open up the VFR holes a bit and use smaller 5m TI bolt and nut to secure. Used a pressure switch which cleaned up the right peg.

IMG_5006.thumb.jpg.8fbf92a83279b670c8405d61cea04a20.jpgIMG_4970.thumb.jpg.df2dfe955e00223438821347fd2f7efb.jpg

IMG_5032.thumb.jpg.4fb70ae23d85b52e7203b794c3856ad1.jpg

 

 

 

Gig, I’m about ready to fit an 848 rear to my 5th gen too. Was inspired by Keef and HighsideNZ’s conversions but like you wanted to stay with 5.5 inch rear. 

 

Now your 848 rear is supplying further inspiration!

 

I wasnt expecting to mill the rear brake hanger like you did - that was a surprise. What exactly did you have to do? I can’t quite make it out in the pictures (my parts are in a shed 45 minutes away right now). Not sure I have that part you show in the first picture, just under the Loctite and bolt. The bit you bolted to the caliper carrier (I think?) with dome bolts. 

 

Also, what size rear sprocket did you go with? Standard 5th gen is 43 (I think?) but Ducati 848 is 39. 

 

I was was thinking about going up 2 teeth to 45. What did you go with and how many links were needed in the chain? Does the chain line up straight? 

 

Finally, I’m also going to go with an aftermarket sprocket carrier that retains the cush drives better. These are known to perish and come loose, grinding down the left face of the hub. Polyurethane Cush drives are available that offer less sloppy drivetrain. 

 

I’m more worried about the chain and wheel both lining up though. 

 

Sorry for all the questions! 

 

Stray

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You will not have to mill the hanger if you get "TI dome head bolts" as i ended up getting from pro bolt.

 

The Sprockets and chain line up perfectly, 

 

I ordered the, front sprocket, quick change 848 sprocket, carrier and cushes from Sprocket Center. I used a stock 848 cover. I run 17/45 or 16/43 gearing, its the best gearing ratio for me.

 

anything else let me know

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Gig, you’re a bloody superstar - thanks! 

 

Will try get mine done by end of summer and post up details. 

 

Thanks again for laying the groundwork. Big debt owed to gig, highsideNZ and Keef who kicked this all off. 

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I love seeing things that I had a hand in starting to snowball and spread around the world.

With my 1098 rear wheel, I used a driven quick change sprocket carrier, and had extreme creations custom make me a 45T (I think it was 45).

 

Next time I need chain and sprockets I'm gonna go down to a 520 to drop some more weight.

My MT09 seems fine on a 520 and it is similar power/weight figures to my vfr fighter.

 

 

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Looking at DID’s website it seems there is only about 400gr between their 520 and 525 chains. I know 400gr is a lot when rotating but is it enough to sacrifice longevity? 

 

Also, how many links are needed? There are offers on DID ZVM-X chains going but they are only about 106 links. If memory serves a 17-45 sprocket setup needs 110 links. Can anyone with this gearing  confirm? 

 

Of course this may vary between 5th and 6th gens as the latter has a longer swingarm. 

 

Thought: if 5th gen comes standard with 17t front sprocket and 6th gen comes standard with 16t, are the speed sensors different? Could a 6th gen speed sensor be plugged into a 5th gen with bigger rear sprocket to correct the optimistic speedo reading? 

 

EDIT: stock 5th gen has 108 links (does that include the soft link?) and FJRider is using this size chain with his 17/45 combo. I wonder, does this push the rear wheel forward (smaller wheelbase) or raise the swingarm a bit? 

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You will have to use 520, I think that is only available size for the combination of a, front VFR and rear 848. The stock length will work for most sprocket variations. The eccentric starts at the 6 o'clock position, so it could move to 5 or 7 o'clock "depending", lowering ride height and changing wheel base slightly. In my experience you want to stay as close to 6 o'clock as possible by adding or subtracting a link if needed.

 

When ordering chain length, they are counting the master link.  

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On 6/13/2018 at 12:14 AM, Stray said:

EDIT: stock 5th gen has 108 links (does that include the soft link?) and FJRider is using this size chain with his 17/45 combo. I wonder, does this push the rear wheel forward (smaller wheelbase) or raise the swingarm a bit? 

 

I tried the stock chain length with the 17/45 on my 5G, thinking that shortening the wheel base would be better.

It wasn't, it lowers the rear height and the bike just didn't feel right. Felt like it wanted to tuck in.

Went the extra two links on my 520 17/45 conversion and it feels a lot better.

6 O'Clock is where it wants to be.

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33 minutes ago, VFROZ said:

 

I tried the stock chain length with the 17/45 on my 5G, thinking that shortening the wheel base would be better.

It wasn't, it lowers the rear height and the bike just didn't feel right. Felt like it wanted to tuck in.

Went the extra two links on my 520 17/45 conversion and it feels a lot better.

6 O'Clock is where it wants to be.

 

VROZ,

With sprocket size other then stock i can't seem to hit 6. If you had to lean one way or the other, would you go 5 o'clock "longer" or 7 "shorter", have you tried both?  

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FWIW, the service manual references the little "wear indicator" sticker on the chain guard, which is on the shorter side. This is where I set mine (or as close as I could get it w/ the new chain's length). It seems based on the offered adjustment, this is on the shorter side of things but I have appropriate slack in the chain.

 

I probably should / could have erred longer, (can always cut it down later) but will give this a whirl for now. In theory, one could drop the front end a bit (more forks above triple) to compensate for lowered rear ride height if experiencing any handling issues and being on the shorter side of things with the wheelbase, if you run out of swing arm angle, it can do bad things.  However, if you adjust accordingly a shorter wheelbase should turn quicker, a longer wheelbase should be a little more stable.

 

 

ChainVFR.JPG

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On 6/12/2018 at 3:03 AM, keef said:

I love seeing things that I had a hand in starting to snowball and spread around the world.

Keef, I recon you’re singlehandedly responsible for the price spike in Ducati 848/1098/1198 hubs and wheels on eBay! 

 

Every man and his wife want one now. Some sellers have gone stark raving mad with their prices. Took me 4 months to source a reasonably priced setup. 

 

Can anyone confirm if the speed sensors on the 6th gen fit on a 5th gen? That might help recalibrate the speedo. 

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I have seen a complete 1098 swingarm (including hub/rotor/caliper, etc) on an aus track junkies site for $100aus.

They are still out there.

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On 6/19/2018 at 12:20 PM, Stray said:

Keef, I recon you’re singlehandedly responsible for the price spike in Ducati 848/1098/1198 hubs and wheels on eBay! 

 

Every man and his wife want one now. Some sellers have gone stark raving mad with their prices. Took me 4 months to source a reasonably priced setup. 

 

Can anyone confirm if the speed sensors on the 6th gen fit on a 5th gen? That might help recalibrate the speedo. 

 

Speed sensors are simple electronic clickers that send the output shaft rotation speed as pulses. This signal is used by the speedo to calculate speed. Swapping sensors won’t change the output pulses. Get a Speedo healer if you want to correct your speedo. It fits between the speed sensor and the speedo and adjusts the number of pulses to correct the speedo display.

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