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Nick Ienatsch 's The Pace


Baileyrock
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We sometimes have the lead rider pass the rolling road blocks, slow down until all can pass, than wick it on again. It doesn't make the cages very happy sometimes, but hey, they started it! :P

We really try to avoid using that one as I know of a couple of horror stories that have happened because a cager got very pissed off. :wheel:

I'm a litttle surprised(pleasantly) to hear that others do use the same "slow the group down to gap the cars" or the "pull off and wait to gap the cars" techniques as it seems like everyone that I've tried to explain the rationale behind it to out here seemed to think I was speaking Swahili or something :goofy:

What do you Mods think...should we do some sort of sticky with this stuff to make it available to everyone?

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Been there, done that. Not me, but one of the other mods. Take a look see.  :wheel:

Guess I missed that one huh(really need that "doh" emoticon again) :lol:

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  • 2 months later...
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I finally read this. It actually fits my riding style very well.

But, I have to have one qualm.

No hanging off? Err cog manipulation. Is this not a tried and tested technique used on a motorcycle to reduce lean angle? Why would this not be acceptable on the street? It seems to me like relying entirely on lean angle would make road hazards more of a problem...... thoughts?

Thanks for the tips on avoiding rolling roadblocks too. I have been using 1 and 2 in my own solo riding, but seeing that they are well known makes the idea of group riding easier.

One of these days I will hve to go riding with someone else. It looks like fun. :D

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Cool read! I agree with Chev, though. Maybe I need to change my syle a bit, but I am in such a habit of moving my butt over on the seat to enter a turn. Left handers get right butt cheek on sadlle and vise-versa, which results in a bit of hang-off, nothing radical mind you. I find it so much easier to steer my 94 VFR that way.

I think I need a nice track day and some professional guidance again. It's been 18 years since I have been to one. :thumbsup:

A riding buddy of mine has a big 1200 BMW four, and he never hangs a knee off, but rides VERY fast and smooth lines.

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I finally read this.? It actually fits my riding style very well.?

But, I have to have one qualm.

No hanging off?? Err cog manipulation.? Is this not a tried and tested technique used on a motorcycle to reduce lean angle?? Why would this not be acceptable on the street?? It seems to me like relying entirely on lean angle would make road hazards more of a problem...... thoughts?

I understand you're qualm as I had the same question. The main reason Nick suggests not "hanging off" as much on the street in the Pace is because it can give the appearance that one is racing/speeding to the law enforcement community.

I asked Nick about this(not hanging off on the street) and he kind of smiled and said "well.................." You get the point :P

Yes it is a technique that definitely reduces the bikes lean angle which is a very good thing for obvious saftey reasons. That's one of the first things they explain in their classes as it allows you to have a much greater safety margin for negotiating road hazards etc. as you quite rightly mentioned B)

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I asked Nick about this(not hanging off on the street) and he kind of smiled and said "well.................."  You get the point :P

As long as I don't show up for my first ride, slide a bit in the first corner and get blacklisted, everything is going to be ok. :D

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  • 1 month later...
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Oh sure, call me on that ! <_<

Actually, we stay below 85 mph 95% of the time, but there's this one sweet section on our loop were we just let it fly. :P

I only ride straight roads and never speed..........

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What is your point friend? :unsure:

I'm actually falling over in my avitar! :goofy:

Left you a message over on "Corner Speed".....getting to be quite a few Tennessee people on lately :thumbsup:

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  • 11 months later...
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I remember a hot discussion here about Code's and Spencer's schools - which one is better. What was written by Ienatsch here about throttle control, no late braking, no braking, early in and open gas before apex - exactly the sameis taught by Code in his level I. smile.gif

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  • 1 year later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I was reading the "Pace", which is pretty much how I ride(exception being I'm slower than alot of you guys). To me working on all the techno aspects of control, is as injoyable as trying to do max speed cornering(I have a big problem with pushing the speed on turns on public roads, more to do with trusting what's on the road, sand/oil/etc.). Which leads me to what I've been working on lately when I'm out riding. I've been going into turns, then changing my line in the middle of it as if there was something in my path (car/sand). I've pretty much have been able to do this anyway, but practicing it makes it a lot easier to do with more precession. The reason I thought I'd bring it up, is from all the people that seem to lose it in turns due to not being able to make that type of course change. I was just wondering if any of you ever practice stuff like this, and if it helps you, and what other things do you work on?.............. Monk

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I was reading the "Pace", which is pretty much how I ride(exception being I'm slower than alot of you guys). To me working on all the techno aspects of control, is as injoyable as trying to do max speed cornering(I have a big problem with pushing the speed on turns on public roads, more to do with trusting what's on the road, sand/oil/etc.). Which leads me to what I've been working on lately when I'm out riding. I've been going into turns, then changing my line in the middle of it as if there was something in my path (car/sand). I've pretty much have been able to do this anyway, but practicing it makes it a lot easier to do with more precession. The reason I thought I'd bring it up, is from all the people that seem to lose it in turns due to not being able to make that type of course change. I was just wondering if any of you ever practice stuff like this, and if it helps you, and what other things do you work on?.............. Monk

I often practice panic braking both straight and cornering, line changing(corners) & wheelies! :laugh:

Practice is what increases your chances in a panic situation as your mind already has attempted needed manuvers before, requiring less time to react. :fing02:

Something like that! :laugh:

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I often practice panic braking both straight and cornering, line changing(corners) & wheelies! :laugh:

Practice is what increases your chances in a panic situation as your mind already has attempted needed manuvers before, requiring less time to react. :fing02:

Something like that! :laugh:

:cool: Yea!... Like that.........

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Read this article when it came out in Motorcyclist magazine. Reading it again for the first time in the many years since, it makes even more sense today. Everyone who wants to increase their skill level should consider a track based class or just do track days to make strides in cornering and braking confidense.

I've seen too many innocent low sides on the street that could have easily been fatal had a tree, power pole or on coming vehicle been there. I do lean off the bike when I ride but it's mostly for practice and not needed for the speeds I ride. A lot of times I just sit in my seat while the guys in front of me are dragging a knee through the really tight stuff and smile at how little ground they gained by each exit.

Another great thing is how relaxed and ready to still ride I feel when we arrive at our familiar stop and B.S. locations. I ride with faster guys on better equiped bikes and to feel the slightest twinge of competitiveness with them or trying to impress them would surely land me in the loser column.

IMO if you ride for any reason other than the sheer love of riding a motorcycle, commuting and proffesional riders aside, you are likely riding for the wrong reasons.

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A lot of times I just sit in my seat while the guys in front of me are dragging a knee through the really tight stuff and smile at how little ground they gained by each exit.

Really :laugh: :fing02: :laugh:

tongue.gif

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I've seen that link or article several times over the years on various forums

I've got 40 mph roads that are about 80 mph max between the elevational changing blind corners, if running faster that that you got a death wish on public road.

But I've got other roads that are post 100mph in the sweepers and then slow down on the straights , alot depends on the enviornment.

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  • 11 months later...
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I've Just completed an advanced riding technique school at a closed driver training facility in Brisbane, Mt Cotton, If you know it.

This technique was pretty much how the road riding section ended up. We were dong fairly fast laps and most of us were not using the brake, or just momentarily, for most of the circuit.

The thrill of the day was most definitely the thrill of getting the perfect line through each corner, picking the entrance speed , the apex and the exit line just right so that the next corner just flowed on.

Not once did any of the instructers mention "The Pace" however it was very clear, after reading this, that each of them had learned and embraced this technique.

If any of you, older riders and new alike, get the chance to do a course like this on a closed, controlled circuit I highly recommend it. There is nothing like going through a variety of different corners, and having an instructor there to ask for guideance from , or to pick you up on what you are not doing correctly, in an environment that is not peer pressure driven and safely away from other vehicles.

Thank you BR for posting this article. It is bookmarked and printed,

Tom

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