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zRoYz

Program extra HISS keys

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I know US models don't have HISS but Australian, UK. etc models do & because I only had one key & needed a spare just in case this is what I did (just so people know if you lose a HISS key & don't have a spare the only fix is buy complete ECU, key, barrel from Honda unless you kept the silver tag that came with new bike which has a serial number, that is only number Honda can do a replacement key with if all original keys lost & that key has to come from factory).

I can't take credit for this procedure as was found doing search & asking questions but the info came from other models with HISS & couldn't find anything VFR specific so I'm writing this because was done on my 04 VFR800 without a problem. My local Honda dealer charges $50AU to program a key & $58AU for blank key so that is $108 total, It cost me all up $25.45.

1. Buy a blank HISS key, these are different from a normal key only due to chip that is located in plastic part but they look the same as a none HISS key, I found them on Ebay for $25USD delivered (there normally over $50 here in Australia)

2. Take your new key blank with your existing key & have it cut to work (before you bother to program make sure the new key when cut works in all locks because there are a limited number of keys your allowed to program per bike)

3. Go to an electronics store & buy a 1W 100R Carbon Film 5% Resistor now this is where I went ghetto because you can bother to make the special Honda lead which if your able to buy costs over $100 buying clips & plugs & do soldering but I couldn't be bothered because I was only going to use this lead once so I had electronic jumper leads which are simply the alligator clips each end of a wire & you want the small alligator clip type due to needing to get inside bike plug limited space. The good thing about buying these leads is you can place them in your tool kit & use for other things when needed.

4. VFR800 plug used is Ignition Pulse Generator (red plug RHS bike located same place the fuel injection large grey plugs are positioned), this plug has only two wires the solid yellow is your positive + & the other duel color is your negative - feed.

gallery_2353_2169_9414.jpg

VTEC IPGP Ignition Pulse Generator plug (red) location

5. Unplug the red plug & the male part of plug that feeds back to the ECU is what you need to connect too so using you small alligator clips so you can get to terminals in plug clip them on making shore you don't have them touching each other (the small test alligator leads have plastic covers to shield them or you can just strip some of the plastic shielding off the wire if you want after the plug if you can't get what you have into the red plug).

6. Yellow wire from red plug you use other end of alligator lead & clip on your 1W 100R resistor & then get another lead & connect to other side of resistor (remember I did say ghetto lead) that leaves you with an alligator clip to connect to your battery positive terminal +

7. The other wire you connect to the negative terminal on battery -

8. Turn the ignition key to ON using your original key. The immobilizer indicator (HISS) light should come on and stay on (if it starts flashing after 10 seconds there is a fault in your system).

9. Now disconnect the positive + battery connector for 5 seconds before reattaching it to the battery terminal. The indicator should now come on for 2 seconds then begin to flash repeatedly four times. This indicates the system is now in registration mode. At this point all previous keys except the one in the ignition have cleared or cancelled from the ECU memory, so if you have any extra spares they will need to be re-registered.

10. Turn the ignition to OFF and remove the original HISS key, put it a couple of meters away from the bike so it doesn't interfere with the transponder in the new key.

11. Insert the new key and the ignition to ON. The immobiliser indicator light should come on for 4 seconds then begin to flash repeatedly four times. This indicates the system has registered the new key. Success!

12. If you have any extra keys you want to register, repeat step 10-11. Don't put the original key you started the process with in as its already registered.

13. Once you have registered your spare keys, turn the ignition to OFF, remove the ghetto lead and reconnect your red plug sensor.

14. Now check all your keys start your bike.

NOTE: make sure with the ghetto lead you don't short out any connection to bike frame, if your clumsy rap it all in electrical tape & if your fussy make a lead with solder connections & shrink sleeve.

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This is great work mate. Top marks.

I'll need to program some keys into the bike I've just bought so I'll also try to make a video of the above when I do it. It will be a nice appendix!

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Hey do we know if existing keys can be programmed to another ECU? That is, do the keys themselves have flash memory or is it just a unique ID for each and every key?

With my new bike, I'll probably move my lock barrels over to it as I've got three keys already. If I can code my existing keys into the ECU on the new bike, I'll save myself the cost of blank keys and having them cut.

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THE key is linked to ECU which stores the key data, the key data doesn't change.

I can't find concrete proof but from what I have read your only allowed 4 keys per ECU but don't know if that's in total which means you have 2 programed from factory & your allowed only 2 more, or it means 4 programed at any one time. So if you try to program another barrel your going to use the spare 2 places & you mightn't be able to program anymore. You would be better off buying another key so you at least have 1 spare spot just in case you lose a key later, I just don't know if the 4 in total means programed keys for life of ECU & I'm not willing to test it as I have 1 spare spot left if that is the case.

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Good post. Curious to know what the max number of keys is?

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To do a new barrel you would also need to temp remove one chip from a key so you can use that barrel with the system to switch bike power & have original ECU linked HISS key next to transponder, then once in program registry mode you can replace the chip & move the original key away from transponder.

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I can't find concrete proof but from what I have read your only allowed 4 keys per ECU but don't know if that's in total which means you have 2 programed from factory & your allowed only 2 more,

You can have a max of 4 keys programmed at the same time. When you program new keys, all keys besides the key that is currently in the ignition switch get erased from memory. So if you want to add an extra spare key you have to program all your keys again.

Attached is an excerpt from a Honda manual (in Dutch) that describes the procedure.

inleren.pdf

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To do a new barrel you would also need to temp remove one chip from a key so you can use that barrel with the system to switch bike power & have original ECU linked HISS key next to transponder, then once in program registry mode you can replace the chip & move the original key away from transponder.

It's nowhere near that complicated! Since you have confirmed that the keys themselves are static, here's what I'm gonna do:

  • Move ECU and HISS transponder from 2006 bike to 2002 bike
  • On 2002 bike, disconnect ignition switch connector block (under right-side fairing)
  • Hold 2006 ECU key against HISS transponder
  • Connect up the ghetto reprogramming tool so the ECU will go into programming mode
  • Jumper the ignition block so the ECU boots up and recognises the 2006 key
  • Remove jumper, plug the ignition barrel back into the connector block and move the original ECU key far away.
  • Follow your procedures above to program all 3 of my old keys into the new ECU

I'm definitely going to video this sucker.

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Picked up my 1W 100R 5% carbon film resistor and some alligator clips today. Grand total was like four dollars or something.

Eat THAT, Honda.

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It is much easier to remove chip the key where the honda logo is on one side is a removable panel that is just glued on, once you remove that with a small screw driver the chip is just pushed in a slot you can remove it. Then when finished you can put chip back in & re glue panel on key, that seems easier than jump wiring the ignition.

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It is much easier to remove chip the key where the honda logo is on one side is a removable panel that is just glued on, once you remove that with a small screw driver the chip is just pushed in a slot you can remove it. Then when finished you can put chip back in & re glue panel on key, that seems easier than jump wiring the ignition.

Huh? Last time I looked at one of my '02 keys the chip was epoxied into the key under that sticker and not removable. UPDATE: They're only sealed in using silicon and pop out easily.

gallery_380_3458_404207.jpg

HISS chip epoxied siliconed into OEM Honda VFR800 key.

I think it must be those aftermarket eBay ones you're buying which aren't sealed into the key.

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My Mistake the spare key I have doesn't have chip epoxied you can remove it.

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My Mistake the spare key I have doesn't have chip epoxied you can remove it.

I guess the eBay specials are fairly "aftermarket" and that the HISS transponders are off-the-shelf RFID technology which is easily replicated.

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Well I ordered some pre-cut keys without chips from the UK, based on a high-res picture of my 2006 key. They confirmed for me that the chips are not epoxied in, just siliconed in and so they pop right out!

Grand total for two cut keys was 38 Aussie dollars - shipped. Since I already have two spare keys from my '02 bike I'll just pop the chips out of them.

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OK, so that didn't work. My two spare keys arrived today and I put my existing transponders in them. When programming the keys, the HISS light flashed like so:

  • Short Flash
  • Short Flash
  • Long Flash
  • Pause
  • Long Flash

It did this for both of the old transponders in the new keys. After removing the ghetto lead, the new keys did not work. It seems to say on other forums that the programming phase actually DOES write to the key's memory with the ECU's unique password. Ergo, it looks like only blank transponders will work unless there is a way an existing transponder can be overwritten.

Looks like the keys that come with chips in them may me the only viable solution?

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Hey folks I found a source for the transponder chips and have ordered a batch of ten for $38 AUD. Only 90% sure they'll work for now but when they arrive I will let you know. The chips are marked as "ID46" transponders, pre-coded to Honda. These chips look to be used by many manufacturers and they need to be pre-coded to that manufacturer or it won't work.

Here's the link:

http://www.auobd2.co...cs-lot-164.html

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Righto those new chips worked a charm! I now have a spare 8 transponders for anyone who wants some. I have a YouTube video showing the process as written up by zRoYz being uploaded right now too.

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Hi there kaldek and others, am going do this but was just wondering if one the us keys will work ? link below

http://www.ebay.com....=item564030318d

They will only work if there is a space for the transponder. I have a spare eight transponders mate so you're welcome to a couple of them for a few bucks.

Bear in mind this key is a true blank and you will have to pay to have it cut. If you use the guys I did in the UK they can cut the key based on a high-res photo of the original. I got two keys cut and delivered for $38 AUD in total, and then I just put the transponders in myself.

Here's the link to the guys in the UK:

http://www.ebay.com....#ht_1573wt_1396

You could also contact them directly. The business website is http://keysinthepost.com. I have no complaints and they were extremely helpful when I discovered I needed to buy some transponders.

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Just curious why you didn't get them cut locally?

Timing. Ordering pre-cut keys was one less step needed to get the job done, otherwise it would have been waiting for postage and then having to go see a key cutter. I only trust locksmiths and there aren't any nearby, so it would have eaten up a lot of my time to get it done.

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hi kaldek, just ordered 2 blank keys, can i purchase 2 transponders off of you mate ?

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hi kaldek, just ordered 2 blank keys, can i purchase 2 transponders off of you mate ?

Sure mate - yours for $8 shipped (they cost me $3.80 each so that'll cover them and postage). I'll PM you so you can give me your address and you can Paypal me the buckeroos.

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