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Terry

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Terry last won the day on May 21

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About Terry

  • Rank
    Offering ill-informed opinions since 1982
  • Birthday 09/29/1964

Profile Information

  • Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
  • In My Garage:
    1999 VFR800FiX, 1997 VTR1000FV, 1990 ST1100

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  1. Nice job JJ; great photography too.
  2. My VFR1100ST, with a gauge that looks like it is meant to be there (but its not...): Honda marine gauge, fitted in the headlight adjuster receptacle.
  3. I agree that the most likely culprit will be a float valve, but could also be a loose floatbowl drain screw, or an o-ring between the carbs, or as you say a fuel line. For the float valves, these are easily accessed once the carb bowl is removed, the float hinge pin is slid out and the float valve piston will lift out with the float. Look very closely at the rubber cone tip on the float valve, replace if it has a ridge or lip, otherwise just clean well, and do the same to the seat in mates to. Chances are you might just have a little grit that is stopping it sealing, and that would suggest time for a new fuel filter as well. Give the float bowls a thorough clean, and if you feel enthusiastic, clean the jets. Be really careful with the floatbowl screws, very easy to round these out without care. If you have them JIS screwdrivers are the best way to avoid chewing them out. If you do have to remove the carbs, I'd suggest you invest in some new inlet rubbers as the old ones go hard, sometime crack and the act of removal/refitting can apparently crack them leading to air leaks and poor running. They're not expensive and will definitely also make refitting the carbs easier, especially if you add a little silicone lube to the process.
  4. I would recount the number of links very carefully; sounds like the new chain is 2-links longer than the OEM. There's no issue with using it like that provided you have enough adjustment left in the eccentric to maintain the right slack as it stretches. Or maybe someone has moved the wear indicator sticker?
  5. I used correction fluid for that, marked the tooth close a good reference point on the cam saddles:
  6. I'm no newbie either (I have 5 more years on you!). But as Scotty, says " ye cannae change the laws of physics, captain". I was quite serious about reading or watching A Twist of The Wrist. Now that is a well thought-through and well-reasoned bit of instructional advice. Even an old(er) dog like myself found some new stuff to think about.
  7. You need to get the kid to help as soon as they're old enough...Nappies are great for soaking up oil spills. This one's at university now, my how time flies...
  8. Jeepers! Hope she was a good motorcycle tech, and not relying on her skills as an instructor. That advice could not be more wrong. Watch a GP race and check the weight transfer during hard stopping, the rear wheel is usually either skipping or completely off the ground, and all the bike's weight is on the front. At that point, applying the back brake will slow the back wheel but not the bike i.e. it is useless. Lots of racers don't use the back brake at all except for wheelie control. I'd suggest you take a course (with someone else) or at least check out The Twist of the Wrist book/videos.
  9. Here's the diagram from the manual. Not sure which head you took photos of but if that is the rear one, then you are 360 degrees off TDC for #1, based on the scribed lines on the side of the gears (at TDC #1 the mark on the exhaust cam gears should be at 12 o'clock).
  10. Personally, I don't get too hung up on the crank/cam position. So long as the cam lobe is pointing directly away from the valve bucket (i.e. up), you know you are on the base circle of the cam and can check the clearance. Yes, you should be able to push the feeler right through the gap, but there should be some drag on the feeler as you do this.
  11. AFAIK most Honda clutch masters use the same bore size. If you look up the part number for the VFR700 master piston kit, you wiil find the following bikes all use the same piece, so finding a used replacement should be very easy: 1982 VF750C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1982 VF750S A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 CB550SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 CB650SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 VF750C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 VF750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 VF750S A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1983 VT750C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 CB650SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 CB650SC AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 CB700SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1984 CB700SC AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1984 VF1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF500C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF500C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF500F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF500F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700S A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF700S AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VF750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VT700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1984 VT700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 CB650SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 CB650SC AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 CB700SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1985 CB700SC AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1985 VF1000R A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF1000R AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF500C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF500C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF500F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF500F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700S A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VF700S AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VT700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1985 VT700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 CB700SC A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1986 CB700SC AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER + LEFT CONTROL LEVER 1986 VF1000R A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VF1000R AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VF500F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VF500F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VF700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VF700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VFR700F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 86 1986 VFR700F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 86 1986 VFR700F2 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 86 1986 VFR700F2 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 86 1986 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VT700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1986 VT700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 VF700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 VF700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 VFR700F2 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 87 1987 VFR700F2 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 87 1987 VT700C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1987 VT700C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 VF750C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 VF750C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 VT800C A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1988 VT800C AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1989 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1989 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 VFR750R A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1990 VFR750R AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1991 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1992 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1992 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1992 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1992 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1992 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1993 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 CB1000 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 CB1000 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 RVF750R A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1994 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 CB1000 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 CB1000 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1995 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 CBR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 CBR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1996 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 CBR1100XX A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 CBR1100XX AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 VFR750F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1997 VFR750F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 CBR1100XX A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 CBR1100XX AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 PC800 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 PC800 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 VFR800FI A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 VFR800FI AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1998 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 1998 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 1999 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 VFR800FI A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 VFR800FI AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 1999 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 1999 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2000 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2000 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2000 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2000 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2000 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2000 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2001 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2001 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2001 ST1100A A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2001 ST1100A AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2001 VFR800FI A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2001 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2001 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2002 ST1100 A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2002 ST1100 AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2003 ST1100P A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 2003 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2003 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2004 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2004 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 98-04 2005 VTR1000F A CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 05 2005 VTR1000F AC CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER 05
  12. Sorry for the dumb question...did you clean out the low speed jet circuit as part of the rebuild? Because that sounds like where your poor running is coming from.
  13. Sounds like you might have a sensor (e.g. MAP or ECT) that has some terminal corrosion. Once you read the codes, you'll be able to identify which sensor was the culprit. Might be as easy as pulling the connectors apart then reconnecting them.
  14. I think you'll find the strobing LED's are just an artifact of the video recording, a bit like spinning wheels appearing to go backwards or helicopter blades going really slow.