Jump to content

I got nailed!


Recommended Posts

  • Member Contributer

About a month ago I was riding along and heard a loud commotion at my rear wheel area.  A little jitter and as fast as it came on, it went away.  I pull over right away and see that my pyramid hugger fender has been ripped off its mount, but no clue what caused it.  I take a bungee and set it up to hold the fender from running into the tire while I ride home, some 8 miles away.

 

After putting the bike on the lift, I see that culprit.  A 4" duplex nail at a shallow forward facing angle imbedded itself into the tread portion of the tire but never punctured the case.   It stayed in even after it ripped my fender.   

 

So, other than my lost fender, it was a easy pull the nail and ride.  No plug required.

 

While I'm at it, does anybody have a hugger fender they no longer want?  If so, let me know.IMG_6395.thumb.JPG.c0dac58e657b270a28edbb4577acca80.JPG

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member Contributer

Fritzer

 

Wouldn’t it be great if, as well as having road sweepers, the council had magnetic sweepers that drove round and collected all of the nails, screws and other ferrous debris that is the curse of Mr Dunlop’s invention from our roads.
 

Sorry for your woes. I would suggest that although the nail didn’t go all the way through, noting how the structure of the tyre wall is critical for cornering, I would replace the tyre for peace of mind. Last thing you want is it to let go as you are rounding a high speed corner. A shame, as from the photo, it looks a fairly new tyre.

 

Be safe

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member Contributer

THE CHOICE
The choice is yours but I'd start plugging because there is mounting
evidence that plugged tires work and are safe... I have yet to note
anyone armed with first hand knowledge to the contrary...

REPAIRS
Minor tire repair is limited to an area of three quarters of the
normal section width. The maximum diameter of penetration damage
and/or cracking at the base of the injury should be no greater than
3mm. The repair patches must not overlap.

 

For permanent repair,it is only recommended that small punctures
restricted to the tread area be repaired, using a rope type plug. The
current condition of a tire is important in determining whether a tire
is suitable for repair. Some damage limits include: if the tire has
reached its minimum tread depth as indicated by the TWI (tire wear
indicator); ply separation, separation of inner liner and or cutting
of ply cords by penetrating object; brittle or cracked rubber caused
by exhaust heat; broken or bent bead wire, damaged bead zone; damage
caused by under-inflation; softening or swelling of rubber due to oil
or chemical attack; punctures too close together; damage or previous
repair of a puncture outside of area specified for suitable repair.

 

sEe6acr.jpg

 

MY EXPERIENCES
My screwed Rennsport... boo hoo...
yVjCfXr.jpg

 

My plugged Rennsport that covered 2K miles and not in moderation
either... it's seen over a 140 mph more than once...
WgFdSPa.jpg

 

Inside the Rennsport for proof that the rope type plugs stay intact
whereas my mushroom type plug started to come unstuck...
P9Lz5uH.jpg

 

You can see by the diagram that Safety Seal plugs that are installed
properly establish an mushroom shape inside the carcass that holds
fast under pressure... you'd have more luck pushing the plug inside
carcass than you'll ever have it pop out under pressure...
gallery_3131_51_10376.jpg

 

Self Vulcanizing Ropes are convenient to buy and convenient to install
for the Do-It-Yourself owner unable to locate a shop to assume the liability
of a inside Combi Plug for such little profit...

3 Steps on the rode again Self Vulcanizing Ropes...

Rope1) Ream hole with tool provided in the kit found at any parts store
Rope2) Insert rope with tool provided in the kit and trim excess
Rope3) Inflate tire to proper PSI
XP8kU6D.jpg

 

I don't recommend the inside Combi / mushroom type plugs because
I discovered that the inside patch is solely dependent on a bond
between a plug company's material and the tire manufacture's rubber
compound... that's a crap shoot the two chemical compounds are
compatible enough to hold a bond when the rubber is stationary and at
room temperature... but tires are elastic bodies designed to flex from
completely round to completely flat at every rotation... every
rotation builds heat that works against that bond... every rotation
flexes that mushroom patch from round to flat that works against that
bond.... so we have heat coupled with flex working against the two
competing chemical bonds from being as consistence as a self
vulcanizing rope plug installed from the outside..
8ucfYeu.jpg

 

7 difficult steps for a due-it-yourself or for a shop to install an inside Combi
Plug whereas the Self Vulcanizing Ropes are convenient to buy and
convenient to install for the Do-It-Yourself owner unable to locate a shop to
assume the liability of a inside Combi Plug for such little profit...
gyx5Pw5.jpg

 

 

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member Contributer

I have been using plugs on flat tires for the last 6 or 7 years.  What a great technique to repair tires.  It is a rare event that requires taking my tire in for flat repair, and if I have to take it in, they don't usually want to repair for liability reasons.

 

Not to mention the ease of repair while on the road.  Don't forget to bring the compressor with you!

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member Contributer
18 minutes ago, Fritzer said:

I have been using plugs on flat tires for the last 6 or 7 years.  What a great technique to repair tires.  It is a rare event that requires taking my tire in for flat repair, and if I have to take it in, they don't usually want to repair for liability reasons.

 

Not to mention the ease of repair while on the road.  Don't forget to bring the compressor with you!

 

For the last 12 years or so I have carried a Slime mini compressor on my bikes along with the tools and plugs. The compressor fits nicely into the left upper part of the fairing on my 3rd and 4th gens, The plugs and tools are in my Tail bag. On my V65 Sabre I hard mounted a compressor to the bike with a switch.

 

Large swaths of Maine, and northern New England have no motorcycle services along with no cell service as does parts of the west in Utah, Montana, North Dakota etc.. Better to be self sufficient than stuck in a lonely place.. Used it once myself, then on some Harley in Colorado, then a Camry in I think, Quebec. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member Contributer

Any repairs to a V rated tyre is only permitted on a “get somewhere to replace the tyre basis” in the UK

 

Its illegal for a tyre company to repair the tyre and your insurance is invalid if you do otherwise 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.