Jump to content

Fuel Injection Light on after cutting out


Recommended Posts

Step 2 Continued. 
 

Video checking the pins on the grey ground bar. One side at a time. 
 

One connector is slightly higher - the second pin in the second video. 
 

Will welcome your thoughts on that second pin and also, the test regime for the ECM to ground. 
 

Thanks Grum

 

Alex

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer

Good job. You may have found the most likely cause of your fault! There is a lot of devices relying on the one wire and its connection to the other ground wires via the buss bar.

 

The burnt pin is for the main wire that does go to Ground. All the incoming green wires are joined at this point via the buss bar and then go to actual Ground via that burnt pin and its wire. You can end up with multiple issues because of a bad/high resistance join between the buss bar and the Main Ground wire.

 

Its also interesting to see that there are two Green/Pink wires at that frame ground point, according to my drawing these will be the ECM Grounds B1 and B2. However the B14 ECM Ground appears to go to Earth Block. This could explain the changing brightness of your Fi Light and the continuous running of your Fuel Pump.

 

The tricky issue now is how you're going to fix it. Similar to the Orange colored earth block on the 5th gens that causes multiple issue, you could.

 

1. Cut all wires from the block then solder All the wires together. Wrap the bundle in tape or heat shrink sleeving.

2. See if you can break away all the gray plastic exposing the wire sockets then re insert the buss bar into all the sockets and solder each one. Cover it all with tape.

3. Perhaps you could just remove the one burnt main wire and solder this on top of the buss bar, leaving all others as they are.

4. From your frame ground or the negative of your battery add a nice new wire, then solder this to the top of the buss bar while removed from the earth block. Make sure all the buss bar pins are clean then add a good coating of Ox-Gard to the pins and sockets then reinsert the buss bar. Don't worry about the top plastic cover just tape it up and your done. Also I'm not sure if the buss bar is just pressed into the sockets Or if its embedded into the gray end cap with only the pins exposed, in that case you may need to carefully dig it out from the end cap! Can you take a photo of the buss bar or end cap?

 

NOTE - I've never needed to do this job so I'm only making suggestions - NOT based on personal experience. Perhaps there are other members out there who have experienced this issue that might be able to offer suggestions on repair.

 

Given the poor access you have to the earth block. My thoughts are to give option 4 a go. Purchase a small tube of Ox-Gard it's an excellent product for this application as it greatly assists electrical conduction and blocks out moisture, exactly what you want here. Make sure you create a nice solder joint on the buss bar of your new wire. I'd find a wire gauge just slightly bigger than the gauge of the wire with the burnt socket, plug the buss bar back in with the Ox-Gard applied then terminate the other end of your new wire at the frame Grounds or battery Negative. Wrap the earth block up in tape and your done. The good thing with this option is most of the work can be done easily away from your bike, as you already have the buss bar removed. You're new wire ground wire is simply bypassing your original burnt wire.

 

Also seeing you're going to get some Ox-Gard, undo the main two frame Grounds and apply the stuff there.

 

Good luck hope this sorts out your bikes issues.:fing02:

 

P.s Sorry cant seem to play your videos!

 

 

OxGard.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer

I sometimes wonder why manufacturers put together such lame design configurations.  The two conclusions I've come to have been that for one the average half-life of a typical bike is probably not very long (wrecked /stolen/neglected) so just make it to last for that average life and/or two the design is such to facilitate ease and speed of assembly.  That fuse block seems like a lousy idea, but during the build all the workers need to do is snap the two halfs together and move on.  We're all probably operating these bikes well past their expected life so find ourselves overcoming these types of issues.  Maybe I'm wrong, but I suspect there is at least a bit of truth to it.  For me these projects keep me out of bars and wasting my money on fast women, so maybe for me it's a good thing!  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer

Both your points are correct. Driven by bean-countre department to keep production costs as low as possible.

 

Kawasaki and Toyota suffers from same multiple grounds attaching to single-point issues too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer

Yep, its a real shame that these harness Grounds are simply not soldered as a bunch and sleeved at the production phase. This would surely be cheaper than pins and sockets a buss bar and connector housing! Soldered during manufacture would mean you'd never have an issue with multiple harness Grounds for the life of the bike.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Grum/All

 

This is the busbar. Interestingly there is a natural break between the two sides at the far end of the plug (the opposite end to the main earth wire). You can just about see it in Photo 2. 
 

Alex

 

D7FEE682-C803-42DC-B696-DC40F261073C.jpeg

2803EDDA-87B8-4344-A15A-9380031457DF.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Grum/All

 

It’s a damn shame the video doesn’t work. It shows me running the multimeter along the pins with the black lead on the negative battery terminal which we know is securely earthed. 
 

Taking the photo attached here, the readings on the lower row of ten pins working from RIGHT to LEFT are (where on 200 ohms the multimeter reads 0.08 ohms when the red and black are touched together): 


pin 1 1.0 

2 1.3

3 1.4

4 no continuity

5 ditto

6 0.10

7 no continuity

8 ditto

9 0.10

10 no continuity

 

Taking the upper row working from RIGHT to LEFT:

 

Pin 1 (slightly scorched) 0.09

2 2.8

3-10 no continuity

 

So, if in the table above pin 1 (slightly scorched) is the main earth wire, the earth is Good at 0.09 ohms (0.01 off base reading). 
 

Pin 2 is 2.8. Is this the culprit?

 

I’ve re-assembled for the time being and plan a test ride. The only pin of concern is upper pin 2. 
 

I will report back later - probably Monday. 
 

Thanks all for guidance and patience. 
 

Alex

 

 

9635937E-F03A-4430-A2D8-8580F05DB185.thumb.jpeg.4ce67bbb94fa8e997d81f2fe8b3b8365.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer
2 hours ago, BSR67 said:

Hi Grum/All

 

It’s a damn shame the video doesn’t work. It shows me running the multimeter along the pins with the black lead on the negative battery terminal which we know is securely earthed. 
 

Taking the photo attached here, the readings on the lower row of ten pins working from RIGHT to LEFT are (where on 200 ohms the multimeter reads 0.08 ohms when the red and black are touched together): 


pin 1 1.0 

2 1.3

3 1.4

4 no continuity

5 ditto

6 0.10

7 no continuity

8 ditto

9 0.10

10 no continuity

 

Taking the upper row working from RIGHT to LEFT:

 

Pin 1 (slightly scorched) 0.09

2 2.8

3-10 no continuity

 

So, if in the table above pin 1 (slightly scorched) is the main earth wire, the earth is Good at 0.09 ohms (0.01 off base reading). 
 

Pin 2 is 2.8. Is this the culprit?

 

I’ve re-assembled for the time being and plan a test ride. The only pin of concern is upper pin 2. 
 

I will report back later - probably Monday. 
 

Thanks all for guidance and patience. 
 

Alex

 

 

9635937E-F03A-4430-A2D8-8580F05DB185.thumb.jpeg.4ce67bbb94fa8e997d81f2fe8b3b8365.jpeg

Alex.

Sorry to tell you this, but the resistance measurements you have taken of all the pins are all of no use at all with respect to the Negative terminal. This is because you have the buss bar removed so now all the incoming grounds are floating, they're not connected to anything other than the device at the opposite end, they are no longer grounded.

 

As already mentioned, all the incoming ground seeking wires rely on the one outgoing Ground wire which is Grounded, the one that is scorched (top right corner of your photo). The problem is the connection of the buss bar and socket for the all important grounding ground wire has become overheated/burnt/scorched/high resistance, meaning all the devices hanging off the other green wires won't be seeing a good Ground they need to function properly.

Sorry I cant explain any better than that!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer
2 hours ago, BSR67 said:

Hi Grum/All

 

This is the busbar. Interestingly there is a natural break between the two sides at the far end of the plug (the opposite end to the main earth wire). You can just about see it in Photo 2. 
 

Alex

 

D7FEE682-C803-42DC-B696-DC40F261073C.jpeg

2803EDDA-87B8-4344-A15A-9380031457DF.jpeg

Ok, if you say there is a break between the upper and lower pin rows, then that might just mean you have two wires that are properly grounded, one for each row.

So check with your meter on ohms, one lead connected to the upper row of pins, the other lead to the lower row. If you have zero ohms then all pins are joined together. If you measure open circuit then you have two rows with two grounding wires, this would help to share the load on the true ground wires. However this changes nothing with the suggested repair options. Ultimately all wires on the earth block need to be connected to each other.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Grum. 
 

Good advice as ever. I’ve managed 84 miles on the bike without a hitch so far. 
 

Will undertake the busbar mod as soon as possible - soldering the group together. 
 

Shocks me, as it does others, how undersized and basic the wires and devices are given the load and heat. 
 

Thanks very much

 

Alex

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer

Wires are actually sized properly for load. Problem is corrosion over time on surface of terminals. This corrosion increases resistance of connection and creates heat. Made worse by concentrating multiple wires' current through one or two terminals.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member Contributer
7 hours ago, Grum said:

Yep, its a real shame that these harness Grounds are simply not soldered as a bunch and sleeved at the production phase. This would surely be cheaper than pins and sockets a buss bar and connector housing! Soldered during manufacture would mean you'd never have an issue with multiple harness Grounds for the life of the bike.

Up until '60s in U.S., kids in school were still taught how to tie wires and solder. Then with faster mechanised production in '70s, crimping was used to lower production costs. It was all downhill from there!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.