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JETS

Member Contributer
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JETS last won the day on October 8 2012

JETS had the most liked content!

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About JETS

  • Rank
    Cloverleaf Hero
  • Birthday 11/26/1942

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  • Yahoo
    t_hampton

Profile Information

  • Location
    Dallas, Texas USA
  • In My Garage:
    vfr 750 1997, yamaha xs 650 1983, Nighthawk750 with sidecar 2003, SV650 race bike 2000

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  1. Hi JETS, Thank you for your donation of 10.00 USD. We look forward to improving the forums with your donation. Thanks VFRDiscussion
  2. Hi JETS, Thank you for your donation of 25.00 USD. We look forward to improving the forums with your donation. Thanks VFRDiscussion
  3. Read for yourself, this tester feels the Honda Filter isn't of the same quality as the recommended filters. http://www.calsci.com/motorcycleinfo/Filters.html#OilFilters But just like oil to a certain level, anyone will work if you change it often enough or before it starts to loose it's ability to do what it's meant to do. ++++4 on what Baileyrock has said. Read the article, then comment. We are not closed minded, but this has all been hashed to pieces several times. The only time the by-pass opens is if the filter is near clogged and causes a backpressure which exceeds the pop-off bypass level. Motorcycles do not normally have very high pressures or high flows as compared to the auto engines that these filters were designed for. The margin of reserve flow to prevent over pressuring is quite large. Unfiltered oil is extremely unlikely if the filter is ever changed, and the oil is not sludged out. I think the important factors regards quality of filtration, especially in small micron size, is the best protective factor to consider when choosing a fliter.
  4. JETS

    IMG 20120401 144121

    That is a beautiful bike. Good job. Very tasteful, which is an excellent accomplishment when you go the branded livery route. I think you hit one out of the park!
  5. JETS

    uploads

  6. So....you might not regret selling the wife, eh? Before you do that, can I send you my personal info and address so you can put that VFR in your will for me? How soon can I expect the sale?? ;- )
  7. Somehow you are feeling the back torque that normally occurs with a v-4. I'm not sure why it affects you so much, but the standard answers are there in throttle management, idle RPM setting, clutch release, and if available, the use of slipper clutches. Reprogramming to reconfigure off-throttle RPM roll back could theoretically retard engine braking. One would have that deceleration rate to live with in all circumstances, so I can imagine it would not suit all downshifting circumstances. The main purpose of downshifting is to be in the best RPM range in the power band to use for acceleration out of the apex in any case. As some wag has said, "The engine is not a brake", although it can become an expensive one. I have tried killing the motor at speed and rolling throttle open or closed. There is a small perceptible difference in retardation, but not strongly so, not near enough to warrant all the fuss over it as a passive device. Opening a live throttle, on the other hand, has an enormous effect on deceleration. I'd shop there.
  8. Read some on repairing ABS. You will save yourself a lot of grief and wasted effort. Polyester "fiberglass" resin does not form a strong bond with ABS, nor do most epoxies. Go to the Urethane Supply website and poke around. Buy the book if you really want to know. It isn't harder than what you have done, but really needs the right materials to work.
  9. Engine braking is just running an air compressor with the momentum of the bike and mostly unrelated to sucking on the closed throttle butterflies. Keeping a mildly higher idle, like 1500-1800 will take a lot out of the apparent braking. Learning to slowly slip out the clutch on downshifting is very useful on VFR's, as Jason Pridmore used to demonstrate. Those two simple things will make you more pleased than thrashing around with ECU and imbalanced throttle bodies. Just sayin'
  10. JETS

    trackdays

  11. JETS

    DSC05125.JPG

    Check out the hard bags in his gallery.....what brand??
  12. Strikes me as how you had better figure out what caused the breaking first. This should not happen if something isn't moving that shouldn't be. I think the fender is polypropylene, and it can be welded with the proper adhesive and stainless steel mesh. Since the fender gets a lot of flexing and shaking in daily life, fusion welding is quite likely to fracture. DuraMix 4036 two part or Scotch-Weld 8010 will stick and bond well.
  13. JETS

    VFR repaint

    The results of redone body and the last years mods
  14. On CBR accidentally tweaked a rotor breaking a bead. Damn! But just careful gentle pry-work as described above worked perfectly to realign the disc.Using the dial indicator is essential. I was the carrier that bent and not the steel brake disc as far as I could tell. Worked fine afterwards. Best not to fubar them in the first place, tho.
  15. No road crashes, but did on the track early on, then several later as I pushed it to learn more at the edge. It kind of gets it out of your system to see where a reasonable limit is and survive the error, having learned from it. I am not saying that one needs to crash to learn not to crash, but rather saying that focusing on NOT crashing is a good way to sap your attention to actual riding needs and make it more likely to crash. Getting good at leaning and braking on the track prepares your skill set so much that it is way more than you should ever need on the highway. It builds confidence and gets the "tentative" cobwebs of doubt out of your head. I totally agree that seat time heals much, but I heartily endorse those "do a trackday" urgings posted here.
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