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Terry

Starter Valves

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I'm looking to do the starter valve synch on my 99 VFR800. I've looked at the owner's manual and have a couple of questions that some more experienced souls may be able to help me with.

1. Am I correct that I only need two gauges to do this, because each other cylinder is only being compared to #1?

2. The shop manual lists differences of 10 and 20mm Hg from #1 for valves #3 and #4, but gives no value for #2. What should that be? The same as #1?

I was going to get my local shop do this for me when I had the bike in for a new chain installation as I assumed that it was quick and easy: lift the tank, connect the gauges, tweak the screws. But the mechanic insisted it involved airbox removal. I can't see how that is necessary so now I don't have a whole lot of confidence in him!

I did search the site but if someone can point me to a "how to" guide that would be greatly appreciated.

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IME the starter valve sync is of dubious value. I did mine once. It wasn't very far out, and made no real difference in how it ran. I just used my homemade manometer, and matched them each to #1. On California bikes the vacuum hoses are accessable at a T connection at the rear of the air box. On other models the hoses terminate on stubs on the air box itself. You shouldn't have to pull the box to get to them, but you may need some adaptors to hook 'em up.

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1 and 2 should be the same.

I have a 4 gauge set up, but found them to not be accurate enough.

I'm a refrigeration mechanic, so I have a very accurate electronic gauge, it is only one but found it pretty easy to do, just took a bit longer.

I started by getting them all the same, and then adjusting 3 and 4.

You have to keep going back and adjusting the revs, aparently keeping it to 1200 is important to get it right. Most workshops don't rely on the bikes tacho.

With the 4 dial ones hooked up, it looked like it was pretty close, but once I connected the electronic one, I found them to be out a fair bit.

Now it is done as per book, and it idles a lot smoother and steady, before it would hunt from 1200 to 1300, now it sits really steady.

I has helped slightly to the revs between 1200 and 2500, a bit smoother I think, but only very slightly.

I tried them all the same, and found it doesn't idle as smooth.

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Thanks VFROZ, the manual wasn't entirely clear. I wondered about the 'one at a time method' as I also have access to some decent gauges. What actual vacuum level are we talking about?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi Terry, Here's the site guide.

You can manage with just 2 gauges but it's much easier with 4 as you keep having to adjust both levels and rpm in order to get them all correct. Swapping gauges constantly would be a PITA IMO.

#2 cylinder is the same as #1.

Despite MBrane's experience, I've found the procedure very effective and do it routinely myself now every 4k miles.

Best of luck.

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Thanks for the link and guidance Skids, much appreciated.

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