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NVR2L8

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About NVR2L8

  • Rank
    Factory Team Rider
  • Birthday 05/04/1960

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Profile Information

  • Location
    Chino, CA
  • In My Garage:
    2006 VFR800
    2009 CBR600RR
    2015 Interceptor DLX

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  1. If you're still interested in the Mark Parnes balancer, I have one I no longer use. PM me...
  2. Also interested... Let us know when you nail down the prices and if you'll be offering a combo front/rear price.
  3. NVR2L8

    IMG 0606

    Very Very Very nice...
  4. That pic was taken on June 19th 2010, but given this winter's snowfall who knows when Tioga Pass will open this year. It typically opens the first week of June...my guess is two weeks later than normal. PS: I'm kicking around an idea of doing another 4-day Sierra Nevada Ride sometime in either late August or early September.
  5. 138 downloads

    This is a Mach 1 dyno tuned fuel map for a 2006 VFR800. Mods are listed below. 2006 VFR800 Stock Headers Two Brothers Dual V.A.L.E. Slip-On Mufflers K&N air filter Snorkle Removed Dynojet O2 eliminator kit PAIR System intact but disabled (connector disconnected) Flapper Valve Enabled
  6. When splicing I always try to get as much wire into the connector as possible, and as long as you have a good mechanical connection at the splice points then they are probably fine. The problem with the stator wires, is that when the engine is at typical operating speed (5K rpm or more) the stator is continuously pumping out about 60 volts AC per phase. Current flow is what's burning wires and melting connectors, so if there is too much amperage flowing through these wires, then you have to look at the R/R since it regulates the current flow from the stator. If you're still burning stator wires and don't have resistance in your repairs, then you might have something else going on with your electrical system. This is a really good guide to troubleshooting the stator and R/R: http://www.electrosport.com/media/pdf/fault-finding-diagram.pdf
  7. What's a good way to make this check? Technically you would want to test a run of wire end-to-end, but that isn't possible with the stator wires because you cant easily get to the ends. But what you can do is test the stator per the service manual. So you'll have to somehow get one of your multimeter leads underneath the insulation of each connector or splice on the side that is nearest to the Rectifier/Regulator, and then connect the other lead to ground. The manual says the resistance of each yellow wire to ground should be between 0.1 - 1.0 ohm (which indicates a good stator), so if you have more than 1 ohm then you probably have an issue with your repair/modification.
  8. Those splices look soldered to me, and the fact that they burnt at the splice means that you had a bad solder joint. And based on this picture I say that the failure most likely resulted from resistance and not over-voltage, so keep that in mind when you solder wire-to-wire or use solder to fill in crimp connectors. It's always a good idea to make sure the splice did not create any resistance in the wire, especially if the wire handles a lot of current or voltage. They were soldered, I guess I'll have to work on a better connection next time. This was the other end of the splice, showing a lot of heat at the crimp. Were those quick disconnects crimped and soldered, or just crimped? Either way, you can see evidence of heat there too. But that's exactly how I bypassed the OEM stator connector on my bike, and now I'm wondering if my quick disconnects are also burnt. I don't know what to say about these connectors, except that maybe you used quick disconnects smaller than 14 gauge? If so, as a general rule of thumb then I don't anything less than 14 gauge would be capable of handling the current flow that each phase of the stator is capable of producing. FYI...on a 12 volt system, for a short length of wire 14 gauge is rated at 30 amps, but 18 gauge is only rated at half that.
  9. Those splices look soldered to me, and the fact that they burnt at the splice means that you had a bad solder joint. And based on this picture I say that the failure most likely resulted from resistance and not over-voltage, so keep that in mind when you solder wire-to-wire or use solder to fill in crimp connectors. It's always a good idea to make sure the splice did not create any resistance in the wire, especially if the wire handles a lot of current or voltage.
  10. NVR2L8

    Misc

    Misc
  11. Yea, the green wire on the front side of the blue connector is missing if you've had the recall performed. I think I mentioned that in my post above...
  12. When it comes to the electrical system affecting how the bike runs, I think the VFRness pretty much takes care of the voltage and current capacity/load problems on the 6th Gen bikes. The only other thing is to try a PCIII, as it really helps with the VTEC transition on my bike. Too bad we're on opposite sides of the planet or else I'd let you try my PCIII to see if it makes a difference.
  13. If you as me, the VTEC engagement spot is a tough area to try and hold a steady rpm, and I would think a little surging would almost be normal as the engine transitions from 2 to 4 valve operation. I don't know if you're running a Power Commander, but I have a PCI USB and with Cozye's map, the VTEC engagement is a lot less abrupt and manageable. I still get a little surging though, so I try to either be above or below the VTEC sweet spot. Having said that, aside from the VTEC surge, I think most of my surging problems have been caused by other electrical issues. If you read my posts, you'll see that I noticed a big improvement when I replaced the battery, and just recently I noticed that my low speed mid rpm problems seemed to be coming back again. I thought a new battery was in my future... Just last week though, my Starter Relay fried and the connector mating to it was melted, but after I replaced both I noticed another improvement in how the bike ran. Anyway, if the VTEC area is the only place where you have surging problem I suggest a Power Commander and Coyze's map. If you have surging in other areas, I'd start looking at electrical improvements such as Tightwad's VFRness.
  14. I'm not 100% sure if the blue connector ground wire mod completely eliminates the need for the front wiring harness replacement, but with the new recall front harness, the ground wiring for the headlights is now routed to the right side of the bike and is tapped into the RR wiring instead of going through the blue connector.
  15. Well, so far I haven't heard of any front wiring harness problems (buzzing, no headlights, etc) from those of us who had the recall performed. Discoloration of the 30 amp fuse wiring is another story... :biggrin:
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