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CathyEveridge

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About CathyEveridge

  • Rank
    Club Racer

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  • Location
    Austin. Texas
  • In My Garage:
    No vehicles right now. Soon to be a 2004 VFR800.

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  1. Its not that the bike needs more power, it is that I need to tinker.
  2. Does the vfr800 use a mass airflow sensor MAF or a manifold absolute pressure sensor MAP to determine how much air it is breathing? If there s a MAF somewhere I do not see it in the diagrams. Too bad. That means that for airflow improvements there needs to be some remapping. MAP sensors almost work as well but may need some remapping for something like a cold air input. MAP + IAT the ecu could theoretically calculate the mass as flow. Now I see dry NOS systems which simply depend on the o2 sensors but I would not want to risk doing NOS without a PC. Do power commanders all have switchable maps that could be triggered at the same time as the NOS?
  3. CathyEveridge

    WP 000425

    Never had an auxiliary tank on a bike but I did have 2 50 gallon auxiliaries on my pickup for total load of 120 gallons. Since I got 6 mpg I could go 720 miles.LOL. Anyone try to extend their range with the last Vetter fairing? I like riding but anything over about 3 hours seems excessive to me. I'm not knocking your pleasure but its not mine.
  4. CathyEveridge

    WP 000425

    Never had an auxiliary tank on a bike but I did have 2 50 gallon auxiliaries on my pickup for total load of 120 gallons. Since I got 6 mpg I could go 720 miles.LOL. Anyone try to extend their range with the last Vetter fairing? I like riding but anything over about 3 hours seems excessive to me. I'm not knocking your pleasure but its not mine. http://craigvetter.com/pages/470MPG/Index to making the Last Vetter Fairing.html
  5. This is beautiful. About the only advantage I can see to the exhaust under the tail vfr is if you wanted to stealth a turbo.. The riser pipe would feed the turbo and the turbo would exhaust under the seat. You could probably even keep the cats but to maintain the temperature up to the turbo you would probably want the exhaust ceramic coated. This is not a busa beater but just small quick spooling turbo.
  6. A typical water pump wastes energy by cavitating at high rpms and may pump less water at high rpm. An electric water pump is not driven to cavitations and can supply more water.
  7. Two idler pulleys would be ideal. One of the problems with most motorcycle drive systems is that unless the front drive sprocket is concentric with the swing arm pivot the needed length of the chain or belt that is needed changes with suspension travel. The further away from straight horizontal the loosed the drive medium (belt, chain) becomes. With an idler on either side of the swing arm pivot (above and below) the drive media length can become fixed length. One objection to belt is that one would need to remove the swing arm to replace it. But the final drive on the VDR is topologically outside of the swingarm already. If you could get enough slack to jump a chain off the teeth of the sprockets You could remove a chain without breaking it. Same thing for a belt. This means that for a belt drive with idlers you might be able to remove and install a new belt strictly by loosening the idlers. I read at least one analysis which indicated that chain was inherently jerky and thus we have a need for cush drives in our wheels. This same article indicated that in terms of drive efficiency chains win by a slight margin over belts. However, a few hundred miles into your trip when some of the chain lubricant is use up the belt catches up and becomes just as efficient. We could make chains better. A fully enclosed chain with idler tensioners would be better than a belt in every way except weight. But since the chain is topologically outside the swingarm one can deduce that the Honda engineering was originally for a belt.
  8. there is a good engineering Reason to add either tensioner(s) or idlers. If you add two idlers above and below the swing arm pivot then within some limits the belt neither gets too long or two short (too loose or too tight) during swing arm movements but stays at a constant tension . I do not think it was chance which led Buell to place his idler almost directly under the pivot. With a pair, mounted on the swing arm above and below the swing arm pivot point the belt would be at a fixed distance from the swing arm and suspension travel would neither tighten nor loosen except at extreme ends of travel. .pair of toothed inside idlers paired with smooth outside idlers aligned with the swing arm pivot and displacing the belt so that from the pivot back to the back sprocket the upper and lower belt runs would always both be parallel to the swing arm then suspension movement would not affect belt tension and belt tension would not affect swing arm movement. I recall that some motorcycles in the past used an idler sprocket mounted over the swingarm pivot to prevent chain tension from compressing the rear suspension. this idea has been used before with chains. By the way I figured out the formula for the length of the belt b which is symmetricly mounted on wheels of radiuses R(big) r(small) and d distance between centers. It is complicated and there is a chance ive made a mistake and if anyone wants it I will upload it the derivation when I get to a computer and can enter it in. Notice that the belt leaves the large pully in a tangent direction. A radius R drawn to that tangent point is offset from vertical by some angle theta. Theta is given by Theta = Arcsin((R-r)/d). Using The radian measure for theta I arrived at the following formula for b the length of the belt. B= pi×(R+r) + 2 Theta×(R-r) + 2 (R-r)× cot(Theta) The cotangent function can be eliminated but the formula becomes more complicated. If I can type my derivation into a computer soon I'll upload it so that you can check it. One of my favourite classes to teach is college trig and I may save this problem for the next trig class I teach as project bonus question. Remember.that Theta is written in radians.
  9. there is a good engineering Reason to add either tensioner(s) or idlers. If you add two idlers above and below the swing arm pivot then within some limits the belt neither gets too long or two short (too loose or too tight) during swing arm movements but stays at a constant tension . I do not think it was chance which led Buell to place his idler almost directly under the pivot. With a pair, mounted on the swing arm above and below the swing arm pivot point the belt would be at a fixed distance from the swing arm and suspension travel would neither tighten nor loosen except at extreme ends of travel. .pair of toothed inside idlers paired with smooth outside idlers aligned with the swing arm pivot and displacing the belt so that from the pivot back to the back sprocket the upper and lower belt runs would always both be parallel to the swing arm then suspension movement would not affect belt tension and belt tension would not affect swing arm movement. I recall that some motorcycles in the past used an idler sprocket mounted over the swingarm pivot to prevent chain tension from compressing the rear suspension. this idea has been used before with chains. By the way I figured out the formula for the length of the belt b which is symmetricly mounted on wheels of radiuses R(big) r(small) and d distance between centers. It is complicated and there is a chance ive made a mistake and if anyone wants it I will upload it the derivation when I get to a computer and can enter it in. Notice that the belt leaves the large pully in a tangent direction. A radius R drawn to that tangent point is offset from vertical by some angle theta. Theta is given by Theta = Arcsin((R-r)/d). Using The radian measure for theta I arrived at the following formula for b the length of the belt. B= pi×(R+r) + 2 Theta×(R-r) + 2 (R-r)× cot(Theta) The cotangent function can be eliminated but the formula becomes more complicated. If I can type my derivation into a computer soon I'll upload it so that you can check it. One of my favourite classes to teach is college trig and I may save this problem for the next trig class I teach as project bonus question. Remember.that Thetanis written in radians.
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