Jump to content

TimC

Volunteer
  • Posts

    1,425
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    18

Posts posted by TimC

  1. I agree with everyone above - your new helmet will break in over some time and miles as the pads compress to your exact head size and shape.  It will a little uncomfortable at first, but the new lid and you will get used to each other.  I've found this to be true with my last couple new helmets.  Worst case, you can buy and swap in a thinner pad set.

     

    That being said, every time I try on an AGV it seems a little smaller than the same size helmet from other brands.  So your new helmet might be just a bit smaller than your most recent one you've been wearing for a while.

  2. Sorry, you lost me at non-mountain ride.  😆

     

    Just kidding.  Looks like it was a gorgeous day to ride, and what a great sound!  I got out for a little while on my Beemer.  Better weather has finally arrived in NE Ohio, and now I finally have a little time to ride, too.

  3. 17 hours ago, johnnie903 said:

     

    The reason I looked at it was, I had been told by a few people that it was on the sporty side of sport touring. I was thinking it would be similar to the Ducati Supersport. I guess that is what I think of when I think of a sport touring bike.

     

    I considered a Ducati SuperSport when I was looking for a new (or used) bike to replace my 6th gen. VFR.  A local shop had a nice, low miles SuperSport S in stock, but it already had an issue with a bad fuel tank sensor.  Combine that with a couple other well-known issues with the bike (at least in the first few years of production) and it was a no-go for me.  Plus, it was just too similar to my VFR, and I wanted something different.

     

    Also, the OEM luggage for the SuperSport is only semi-rigid, with zippered closures, and not waterproof hard cases like the VFR's.  That made the bike less attractive to me for use as a sport-tourer.

     

    The other criticism of the SuperSport is it's underpowered for what it is.  Personally, it's more fast enough for me, but I'm not that fast a rider, so middling performance suits me fine.  (I was always happy with my VFR, by the way!)

     

    But I had a seat on a new SuperSport at a local Ducati dealer a couple weekends ago, and now it's just too sporty for my aging (and out of shape) body.  I'm sure would have liked it a few years ago, but I'm glad I passed on it back then when I was bike shopping.

  4. I don't even have a VFR anymore, but I still visit VFRD most days, just to see what's going on.  Plus it's entirely possible I'll own another VFR someday, and this forum is absolutely a treasure for everything VFR-related.  Anyway, I always got far more out of this forum than I put into it, and I'm sure I am not alone, so I'm happy to help out again.

     

    Thanks for letting us know we need to pitch in again, HS.  Hopefully we can fill the well again quickly!  🙂

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 1
  5. I'm glad you got a chance to test ride the bike, even if you found it wasn't the bike for you.  For me, my 6th gen. VFR was the perfect all-arounder for many years, right up until I was about 50, and my knees and neck starting hurting during long rides.  I could have installed a footpeg lowering kit and bar risers, but I didn't really want to change the bike from stock, and after 14 years with it I was really ready for something else.

     

    Also, there's no reason older folks can't still ride supersports.  If your body can handle the ergonomics, go for it!  I have a couple bikes in mind if I were to add a sportbike to my garage, but for better or worse my bank account limits me to one bike at a time.

     

    Good luck with your continued search for your next motorcycle!  👍

    • Like 1
  6. Congratulations on that beautiful 6th gen. and welcome to the forum!  🙂

     

    My VFR was my 2nd motorcycle, and I'm just on my 3rd now.  I started riding in March 2006, and spotted my first VFR (a silver 6th gen.) in a shop a couple months later.  It was love at first sight.  A few months later I bought one from a private seller and rode it for the next 14 years!

  7. Welcome to the forum and thanks for sharing the photo of your gorgeous bike! 🙂

     

    I'm in my mid-50s now, and though I still love looking at all those sexy supersport machines out there, there's no way I could ride one for any length of time.  Still, it would be fun to have one in the garage just for a quick blast here and there!

  8. Welcome to the forum, Johnnie!

     

    I've never done track days, but I rode a 6th gen. VFR for over 14 years for a great variety of uses - commuting, touring, sport-riding in the twisties, and even lazy Sunday fun rides for a few hours.  In my opinion, the VFR's strength is its all-arounder-ness.  It's capable enough to embarrass less experienced or talented riders in the corners, but if they're on newer liter bikes, they'll probably whiz right past you in the straights.  But if you're only doing track days and not racing, I think you'd have a blast on a VFR on the track and on the street.  The V4 engine is just a terrific blend of power and character, especially when revving it from mid to high rpms.

     

    The big plus for many VFR owners are its ergonomics.  I can't imagine riding a supersport more than 30 minutes at a time, but on my old VFR I frequently did all-day rides and trips where I rode 400+ miles a day.  It's a bike that will get you to the good mountain roads comfortably enough, rather than having to trailer it, so you can enjoy the ride to and from, not just in the twisties.

     

    VFRs are not light, but the others above are right - once you're moving the weight is a non-issue.  And the additional heft does make it more stable, including in high winds.  And as others said above, too, it will run forever.  And the wealth of information on this forum is a huge plus to VFR ownership.

    • Like 3
    • Thanks 1
  9. Congrats on your 6th gen. Anniversary bike and welcome to the forum! 🙂

     

    I 100% agree with you, these bikes are great values now.  For the V4 engine, build quality, and quality of components, plus the looks, it's hard to beat a used VFR now.  I sold my 6th gen. a few years ago, but I keep thinking I'll have another VFR sooner or later.

  10. 13 hours ago, St. Stephen said:

     

    Yeah, "Powersports" is the word for many motorcycle dealers now, particularly the non-cruiser ones.

     

     

    In my area (NE Ohio), "Powersports" means mostly an inventory consisting of side-by-sides, ATVs, personal watercraft (aka Jetskis), maybe a couple snowmobiles, and perhaps a handful of very ordinary motorcycles.  That's not always true, of course, but for most of the smaller shops it often is now.  And forget any decent selection of riding gear.  😕

    • Like 1
  11. We are solidly in winter here in NE Ohio.  Even if we hit a warm spell, there is salt all over the roads.  If there's a break in the weather with some warm temperatures after a rainfall to wash the salt away, I'll get out for a quick ride or two.  But the bike will be mainly parked for the next 2-3 months.

     

    Thanks for sharing the photos of your bikes out and about.  Makes me look forward to this spring and summer that much more!  👍

  12. Welcome to the forum!

     

    Looks like great work so far.  I wish I had the time and patience to do a project like this.  As it is I barely have time to ride sometimes.

     

    Keep up the great work and I'm sure we're all looking forward to seeing the rest!  👍

  13. Shocking!  People have actual lives and can't dedicate endless hours to riding for fun?  Blasphemy!!  🙂

     

    I got 6k miles in for 2023.  The year before was 5k, but my bike was offline for a few months due to waiting for a new front wheel to arrive.  I used to average more like 7-8k, but over the years (except for 2020) I've gotten busier and busier as a musician, in addition to my day job.  Being busy some weeknights and most weekends led to fewer rides.  I usually try to do 2-3 trips annually, but managed just one this past year.  At least it was a good one!

     

    If I'm being completely honest, several years ago my annual mileage dropped to about 1,500 for two straight years.  I'd gotten busy (work/gigs) and kind of just lost my mojo for riding.  I'd been looking at buying another bike on and off for a while, but what was the sense in buying a new (or used) motorcycle if I wasn't even riding it that much?  In 2019 I rode more, and even more in 2020 when I had a lot of spare time due to all my musical activities being canceled due to the pandemic.  With the established uptick in miles I decided to go ahead and buy my current bike.  Hopefully this year I'll at least equal the 6k for 2023.

     

    Good on you for already making plans to ride more.  Personally, I'm hoping to finally do the trip to Maine I've been wanting to do for the last few years.  Probably in late August.  🙂

    • Like 1
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.