Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    6
  • comments
    7
  • views
    12615

Cleaning Up The Old (new To Me) Girl; 1999 Vfr800 Fi. Part 3

Sign in to follow this  
ZenMoto

2638 views

So when last I left you, I had just finished up the valves (with the help of my buddy Tony) and needed to get some additional wiring taken care or while waiting for my exhaust to get back from Jet-Hot. ...well, Father's Day weekend was as good a time as any to wrap up my project! :fing02:

It started Friday with a call from my girlfriend that I had "missed" a delivery from FedEx. "Crap! ...that's my exhaust!" After a couple calls to FedEx (the first being a very rude lady telling me I would have to wait until Monday for their next delivery attempt) I found I could drive the 30 miles to the Ventura, CA sort facility and pick up my package as long as I made it before 8pm! ...that's more like it!

So while, chronologically I saw the exhaust before I did any new wiring on the VFR, you're going to get things in the order work was done, so let's flash to the bike. It needed some new wiring for both the heated grips as well as the Datel voltmeter in the dash. I decided to just run 2 pairs of 14g wire from the fuse box forward.

570934421_AUe2L-L.jpg

With both pairs run and labeled I wrapped the whole mess in wiring tape and ran it along the main wiring loom to the back of the bike; overall it gives it a cleaner look, protects the wires, and makes future repairs a bit easier (since you can reuse the wiring tape).

570934435_xq2qx-L.jpg

570934480_svvVC-XL.jpg

Here is the wiring where the two pairs split up; the toggle is for the heated grips, the other pair goes further forward to where the previous owner mounted the volt meter in the dash (a location I hate as it's unreadable, but I'm not ready to buy a new dash panel yet).

570934459_QUaaL-XL.jpg

The next issue involves the fuse box itself. It's a quality, marine grade, fuse box, but it was wired directly to the battery (bad if you leave your heated grips on over night in the middle of South Dakota, for instance). :mad:

570932996_A2js9-O.jpg

I don't have pics of my relay install (so sue me) but I wired in a relay at the rear of the bike, operated off the license plate light as a switch. ...hardly a critical light should something go wonky with the relay etc..

Knowing that I finally had the exhaust, I took a moment to work over the back of the engine case with my Dremel and a small brass wheel; with my DMV inspection coming, I wanted to be sure the engine serial number was clearly visible.

570933018_ga5nN-L.jpg

...it's a far cry from the corroded and caked in pounds of dirt, oil, grease and tar that it was a few weeks ago!

570933044_aDGmV-L.jpg

...so just to annoy you, I'm going to flash backwards slightly to the work week prior to getting the exhaust. There were a couple things I needed to take care of, and luckily, we have an old lathe at work.

If you remember the beginning of this thread, there is a broken cross bar on my subframe, so I wanted to turn a steel bar that would fit in there vs. trying to weld the broken bit back into place. Also, I was missing one of the steel bushings in my left passenger grab-handle. Rather than spend $80 buying a new handle from Mother Honda, I decided to spend a whopping $5 at the Do It Center on a 3' length of "weldable steel" rod; this would be PLENTY for both projects.

Here's my newly turned bushing (left) next to the OEM one from the right handle.

570933073_D7gB7-L.jpg

570933094_QWxQt-L.jpg

And pressed into the grab handle. ...fits like a glove!!!

570933185_ZgZZb-L.jpg

Next would be the insert for the cross bar.

570933206_CzDKo-L.jpg

I needed to tap it (kinda useless if I can't bolt into it).

570933399_kq5CQ-L.jpg

570933414_bCjEP-L.jpg

...that should do it.

It fit's just a little snug into the existing cross bar.

570933474_4UVZb-L.jpg

And the length looks good.

570933509_UjiXY-L.jpg

...a little JB Weld and she'll be good to go!!! :cool:

Ok, fine. Back to the exhaust. You remember this mess:

555539337_YuofN-L.jpg

...well, how do you like me now?

570933665_Rye6S-L.jpg

570933786_cqBTB-L.jpg

570933707_cCvhH-L.jpg

Thank you Jet-Hot! ...I even had them coat the heat shield since it was all marred up.

570933806_UYFud-L.jpg

I also got my 1300# Hyperco spring in the mail from HRP World. :smile:

570933685_WNBdc-L.jpg

Installation went pretty good until I actually had to connect the main header pipe to the pair of connector pipes from the #1 & #3 cylinders. I just didn't have enough muscle to compress them down over the new gaskets. ...luckily, I DO have ratcheting tie down straps in the garage! :thumbsup:

570933906_baWkG-XL.jpg

Yeah, that's what I'm talking about!

570933937_HukzM-L.jpg

They look pretty damned good to me!

570933962_o2No6-L.jpg

NOTE: If you're doing your exhaust, don't forget to slip the clamps over the pipe and up out of the way before compressing them down onto the gasket! ...no I didn't forget, but forgetting would suck, so I bring it up as a little reminder! :wink:

Then I cleaned up all the shock linkage, and flipped the dog bone so if it continued to rub, it would at least rub on a a new spot giving me a little more life from the current dog bone. ...I have no doubt I'll have to replace this piece some day.

570933987_wU5zc-L.jpg

Penske is installed, along with a new chain slider. ...time to stake the new chain!

570934001_4c4fQ-L.jpg

Chain Staking

Slip the new chain around the drive sprocket and rest both halves on the rear sprocket with the bike in gear to prevent anything from moving. ...this makes life a lot easier!

Here are the two halves with the master link in place and the "X-Rings" on and packed in the supplied grease (I love DID).

570934026_Mj2jV-L.jpg

I also love my Motion Pro chain staking kit (it's also really handy to have a 14mm deep well socket and largish socket wrench).

570934045_bKVLK-L.jpg

Place the master link cover plate where it belongs (the grease should hold it in place just fine).

570934063_BoUyg-L.jpg

Line up the chain tool so it lines up with both posts and slowly add pressure using your wrench until you feel it start to really press into place.

570934081_bpg8t-L.jpg

The key to staking a chain is to go slow, and recheck your alignment with the chain tool over and over. As you add a lot of pressure (it takes quite a bit to force the plate over the posts) it will often slip slightly out of alignment.

Once it finally seats over the posts it will suddenly feel much easier to press; be careful not to over press the plate, you only want it flush with the surrounding plates, you don't want to crush the O (or X) rings.

570934101_it5XU-L.jpg

To stake the chain, you need to change out to a pin and anvil in your tool (you stake one pin at a time).

570934122_rhHwd-L.jpg

You don't need to destroy the pin, just slightly deform the ends. Remember how hard it was to press the plate on? There are no heavy forces acting on the plates to push them out, so the slightest deformation in the pin will keep the plate in place forever.

Here's the completed master link.

570934143_5RmgV-L.jpg

570934164_QxFFp-L.jpg

At this point, all that remains is to button up the bike. I have a box full of new hardware to replace all the either rusty / corroded, broken, missing, or just plain wrong hardware that was on the bike.

I got lazy on pics at this point because I just wanted to get her put together. tongue.gif

So here she is, done at last!

570934243_NvJmL-L.jpg

...ok, bike porn time, here's the VFR with her garage mates:

570934209_69Ljn-L.jpg

570934271_H8DcW-L.jpg

570934353_X5WyU-L.jpg

So with her all together it was time for a little test run before cleaning up the garage and putting all the girls back to bed for the night. :cool:

A romp into the Santa Monica Mountains (my back yard) gives me a good chance to shake her down. ...first note, the suspension is bOuNcY BoUnCy, especially in the rear.

I brought some basic tools along to help make any needed adjusttments, and after dialing in a little preload into the front, it settles down a lot. I added some preload to the rear, and it helps, but I really need to reduce the compression damping a little and add some rebound damping. A run down Mulholland to PCH and back up gets the rear more in line, but still not quite enough rebound damping.

I suspect a day of tweaking the suspension while running the same sections of mountain over and over and over will be in order. ...damn, that's tough work!!! :biggrin:

Here's the old girl parked in front of the Rock Store in Malibu while I cool off in the shade after a hard days work!

570934185_3QFry-L.jpg

I hope this little thread helps someone out down the road!

Cheers,

Dale

  • Like 1
Sign in to follow this  


6 Comments


Recommended Comments

Thanks for sharing your time and pics on this 99, I'm sure you have another great ride in your stable.

Share this comment


Link to comment

looks pretty swish! it's amazing how much these little cleanups and a few replacement parts make to the appearance of the bike. nice job.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Thanks! I just had my subframe break exactly where your's did and think I'll try your fix.

Headers and the rest of the bike looks great. :fing02:

Share this comment


Link to comment
Thanks! I just had my subframe break exactly where your's did and think I'll try your fix.

Headers and the rest of the bike looks great. :fing02:

It hasn't given me any problems since the fix. I ended up using JB weld to hold it in place, and with that in mind, I machined out a fer gaps in the portion of the rod sliding into the subframe (just narrow sections where I let the lathe dig in deeper than the surrounding material. My thinking was that this area would fill with JB Weld increasing the shear-strength of the bond. ...probably overkill, but it can't hurt! :)

Good luck on your repair!

Dale

Share this comment


Link to comment
Thanks! I just had my subframe break exactly where your's did and think I'll try your fix.

Headers and the rest of the bike looks great. :fing02:

It hasn't given me any problems since the fix. I ended up using JB weld to hold it in place, and with that in mind, I machined out a fer gaps in the portion of the rod sliding into the subframe (just narrow sections where I let the lathe dig in deeper than the surrounding material. My thinking was that this area would fill with JB Weld increasing the shear-strength of the bond. ...probably overkill, but it can't hurt! :)

Good luck on your repair!

Dale

Thanks, I couldn't get ahold of my machine shop guy today and got a little impatient so I just threaded a rod in to each part and reassembled that way. I suppose it could be welded at some point. Good enough for the fairing but I don't know that I'd hang the Givi's off it again. I guess the best solution would be a solid rod threaded at each end like you did, welded to the subframe to replace the entire hollow shaft. Thanks for the idea, my original thought would have messed the entire thing up I think.

IMG_8222Large.jpg

Share this comment


Link to comment

Picking up my first VRF Fi next week.

Shes old but I can’t wait.

Great write up thanks so much.

Really good read.

IAIN, UK

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy.