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talus

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About talus

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    Factory Team Rider
  • Birthday 01/01/1968

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  • Location
    Victoria, BC
  • In My Garage:
    '02 VFR 800 ABS - Fast RED
    '05 FZ6 - Slow BLUE
    In My Driveway: '93 JETTA - Old RED



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  1. Hey Talus, did you have Action cycle do your safety recall?? I had mine done there in 2007 and now I'm trying to install Tightwads vfrness and it a bit confusing. I was wondering if you'd had the same problem?

    Secord401

  2. I called my local Honda dealer on Saturday asked if they were aware of the recall on the VFRs. The guy I got was totally up to speed on the issue and assured that they had done the recall work on several other VFRs (good because I didn't want to be the practice bike). They had the replacement parts in stock and booked me an appointment for Monday morning so down the the dealer I went - in the pouring rain. I dropped off the bike at 9am and picked it up at 2pm just as they forecast. I had a quick look at the new harness kit before it was installed... it comes in two bags. One bag had the new "Starter Battery Cable" assembly - the new red/white charge wire going into the 30 AMP fuse appears larger - a good thing - and that is all thats new with it. Next I took a look at the "Front Sub Harness" (sorry I should have taken picture). Where the stock one only has one 6P Natural connector that plugs into the Regulator/Rectifier (RR), the new harness has two 6P connectors ("natural" is the color of the plastic BTW). If your familiar with Tightwad's excellent harness "VFRness" you will understand how this works. BTW I don't think this obsoletes Tightwad's harness since I still feel the single factory charge wire running the long way back to the battery is insufficient AND this recall only address the 2002 VFR's onwards. However, I do think you will have issues plugging in Tighwads mod and this recall harness if only for all the other plugs now on the right hand side - it is very crowded over there. Things I wish I did: brought my tube of dielectric grease and greased all the connectors myself right there in the service department' took a photo of the new recall harness for VFRD (if anyone gets a chance lets get a photo), asked for my old harness back so that I could dissect it, and stuck around a watched install and took some pictures - out of curiosity and because I have never had the front cowl off. When I picked up my bike I checked that all fasteners were re-installed and that all lights operated correctly. Then I brought it home and took the right panel off to see what it looks like. Here are the before and after pictures. NOTE: I had modified my harness this summer before bringing it into Honda... see here. The service guys left everything I did alone - none of it interfered with what they were adding anyway. BEFORE. Note the original, single, 6P connector in the top right of the photo. Safety Recall - AFTER. I have left my extra wiring on the bike. I like the redundancy of the extra charge and ground wires. I have also left the RR White/Black wire running directly back to the Battery. I have not put the volt meter on the new recall harness to check the recall white/black wire but I suspect Honda has now bypassed the ignition. Correct me if I'm wrong. For those that don't work on their bikes this is an essential recall item - although the urgency of your recall letter is probably a little overdone - we have had this problem for years HONDA!! For those that do work on their bikes the recall simply address the issues we have all been fixing ourselves. So in summary it looks like Honda addressed three issues with this recall: they upgraded the red/white charge wire at the 30 amp fuse, they had done "something" to the blue connector to address the grounding issue (I didn't look at yet), and they have addressed the white/black RR sensing wire issue. I think Honda is reading VFRD. Now if I can only get my money back for the new RR, stator, battery, and battery harness that I replaced myself this past summer. :blink:
  3. Just got my Canadian Recall notice. Here is a copy. I'm also in the group that is waiting for someone else to have the work done first. After buying my bike (used) this summer I have probably put about 40 hours worth of work into the bike, not counting the endless hours reading this forum and the service manual. I am very happy with my current setup and, I think, understandably worried about letting the techs do the work on it. For those that don't work on their bikes this is an easy decision --- let the Honda guy do it. For those that spend a bunch of time working on our bikes, I think it's only fair to feel a bit concerned about letting the kids at the shop work on them. I would love to get the parts and do it myself. I would like it even better if there was a tech at my local dealer that I knew and trusted. AND - I would love it if the trustworthy tech let me hang out and help (ok supervise) the work. PS - I'm riding daily and I don't plan to stop... call me crazy. Safety Recall Honda Canada
  4. Stock RR and Suggested Rewired RR Here is my version of "beef up 'dem 'dare wires!". This mod/upgrade is meant to fix any under OR overcharging problems, and improve the Regulator/Rectifier (R/R) to battery charging wires and grounds. It was done to a 2002 VFR but years 2002-2005 should have the same wiring harness. This was my 30 Amp fuse wire problem: Toasted 30 Amp fuse wire Followed shortly by a fried stator to R/R 3P connector (to be fair these two problems may not have been related): Totally melted white connector block - located on right hand side under fairing Here is what you'll need: 12 Gauge wire (red and green - nice festive colors) 16 Gauge wire (black - goes with anything) 6 Gauge 1/4" lug (or any lug will fits on your battery terminal and is large enough to take 3 - 12 Ga wires and 1 - 16 Ga wire) 1/4" ring terminal (large enough to crimp in 2 - 12 Gauge wires) Connectors of your choice (female spade and Posi-Lock connectors shown - www.posi-products.com) 12 Gauge in-line fuse (this will be your replacement for the toasty 30 Amp fuse) Fuse block (not shown) - or 3 more in-line fuses Solder Gun Torch Solder Shrink Tube Tape Supplies Here is the final result (note that I re-used my factory 30 amp fuse only because I screwed this mod up the first time): Finished product How to: First of all, I tried the "How To: Replace 30amp Fuse Wires, Charred 30amp fuse wires" post and succeed in mangling the positive post cable connector. There was absolutely no way I was getting that battery terminal de-soldered or pried off. In the end I ordered a new harness and just reused my old 30 Amp fuse holder. *Leave everything on your factory battery harness as is. If you want, you can repair the toasty 30 Amp wire and use that lead to power something but I'm not going to use it here. Strip and twist together 3 - 12 Ga wires (red) and 1 - 16 Ga wire (black) - about 18 inches each or enough to reach wherever you place your fuse block. 6 Ga 1/4 inch Lug and wires - ready to solder Ready your 6 Ga lug with some solder cut and placed inside it. The first time I did this I used vice grips to hold the lug but I found that they soak up so much heat that it takes a while to get lug hot and the solder melted. The next time I did it I clamped the lug in between some wood - the lug heats up very quickly this way! Stand the lug up vertically so you can heat it with your torch and melt the solder - creating a pool of solder inside the lug. With the solder still liquid, jam the 4 wires that you grouped together into hot solder and hold the wires there until the solder cools. I suppose you could crimp the lug at this point but mine was a nice fit. 6 Ga 1/4 inch Lug Add some shrink tubing and your ready to test fit in the bike. I found there was more space around the back side of the battery - opposite the factory harness. 2 of the reds wires and the 1 black go to the fuse block. The other red wire gets an inline fuse and goes to the factory connector to the bike (where you disconnected the toasty section of the 30 Amp wire from - just seen in the top right side of the following picture). Battery Side - before tape Next you'll need to remove your R/R. Kanadian Ken shows you how to do it here -- 6th Gen Monitor Wire Fix. I'll cover the monitor wire fix also. Remove the 6 pin connector so that you can get at the 2 red charging wires and the 2 green ground wires (see Kens post on how to remove the spade connectors - a small jewelers screwdriver does the trick). R/R 6P connector removed Here is the point of no return - where you modify the a factory piece - but hey it's only the R/R and that seems to need replacing on a regular basis anyway :rolleyes: . Using 2 - 12 Ga (red wires - about 36 inches each) and 2 - 12 Ga (green wires - about 24 inches each) wires, I made "button hook" connections (covered on the forum somewhere?) to the charge and ground wires of the R/R. To do that, you'll want to strip off about 3/4 inch of insulation from each of the factory R/R wires (the green and red ones). Then using my jewelers screwdriver, I opened up the factory wires in the center so that I could pass the new 12 gauge wire through. Once the new wire was through the hole I split the 12 gauge wire in two parts and twisted them tightly around the outside of the factory wire - closing the hole up. Then I soldered the connection and finished with tape. Finally, fit the spade connectors back into the 6P plug, but leave the black "monitor" wire out. Button hook connections If I had to do it over again I would remove the factory black insulation jacket to about half way beween the 6P plug and the R/R and make my connection there. This would keep the mess of connections farther away from all the plugs and allow straighter wire runs. Just look at your R/R when it's on the bike and you'll see how much room is over the radiator - this would be a better place to make those connections. Reattach the R/R and route your wires. Wire routing on right hand side I initially made my connections to the R/R charge wires with Posi-Taps. However, they are quite large and there wasn't enough room for 4 of them. Another issue is that they come off at a 90 degree angle which is fine if it works for you. Lastly the posi-taps only make the connection with a small needle point and this seemed like a bit of a choke point to me. Here is a picture before I removed them, you can see the small hole they make ... FYI - Posi-Tap connectors - later removed Instead I used the Posi-Lock straight connectors which make a nice solid, beefy connection - and they are removable (so I could pull the whole harness out to show you guys). *You will also notice that the Black "sensing wire" was NOT put back into the 6P plug. It gets some shrink tube on it's rather long blade and then gets connected to a spade connector and run to the fuse block. New charge and ground wires Next, to attached the new ground wires, I crimped on a ring terminal and then added soldered for security. Since the grounds were a such a short run I didn't bother making a disconnect. I did wonder if I should run the grounds all the way back to the main frame ground (under the fuel tank) but after taking some resistance reading it would not have made a difference. The grounds hook up to the bolt that holds the fairing offset. New charge and ground wires taped Then I measured and cut my wires from the battery and from the R/R to the fuse block. The fuse block is a nice little "Hella Splash Proof 4 Gang ATC Fuse Block, Spade Side Connectors HL62936". It was about $12 at the independent NAPA dealer here. Of course you could just use some inline fuses to do the job as well. Stolen Webpic of HL62936 Hella Splash Proof 4 Gang ATC Fuse Block, Spade Side The one thing that I didn't like about the fuse block was that the base was open. I simply took some silicone and sealed it up - the top cover has a little gasket to keep water out. It's a pretty tight fit - I even used some pla-doh to check the clearance between the top of the fuse box and the seat - VERY tight. Fuse Block - close up Fuse Block Fuse Block - side With all the wires in place I then taped everything and zip-tied it into place. I also made sure to put dielectric grease on everything - new or old. If you want to reverse this mod (lets say for warranty reasons) you'll need to cut the wires from the R/R or buy a new R/R and then simply remove the harness. Battery Side - routed behind battery Taped and routed In the end my beefed up charging system now has three routes - 1 factory routing and 2 re-enforced routings direct from the R/R. The grounds from the R/R are beefed up and redundant which should hopefully help. And finally, running the the black monitor wire directly to the battery solves any issues with resistance in the ignition circuit causing overcharging. I haven't quite decided on what size fuses to use in the charging wires - I started with 25 amp then switched to 20 Amp fuses. My charging voltage is stable at 14.3 to 14.5 volts with high or low beams on, from idle all the way up and I am much more confidant with the electrics now. The last thing I added was a voltmeter to monitor the situation. You can see it here at Lascar Voltmeter Install Pics.
  5. talus

    Stator Tests

    My version of the How-To replace your stator and flywheel is done. Replace Stator And Flywheel - How To With Pics
  6. Might have a problem. Before we use any power tools, let's take a moment to talk about shop safety. Be sure to read, understand, and follow all the safety rules that come with your power tools. Knowing how to use your power tools properly will greatly reduce the risk of personal injury. And remember this: there is no more important safety rule than to wear these — safety glasses. Always wanted to say that! (credit Norm Abram) Below are some pictures of the stator to regulator/rectifier 3P connector located on the right had side of the bike under the fairing. This is what lead me to a stator replacement (besides the not-so-cool smell of burning plastic and flat batteries)... Totally melted white connector block. References: Honda Service Manual (Chapter 17 for Year '02) - Found in Forum Downloads 2002 VFR800 Stator Recall Letter - Found in Sixth Generation VFR's VFR Discussion HOW-TO Stator Replacement Besides your regular tools you will need: Torque wrench capable of 12 N-m or 9 lbf-ft Torque wrench capable of 103 N-m or 76 lbf-ft Specified Honda Flywheel Puller or a Flywheel Puller with small arms Specified Honda Flywheel Holder or a strap wrench Gasket scraper Gasket sealant As far as level of difficulty goes this job rates just slightly harder than changing your oil - and only because a couple more tools are required. First, remove both left and right side panels then remove the radiator overflow bottle and hang it out of the way (no need to empty it). Radiator overflow - wired out of the way Next, undo the electrical connectors. I had a heck of a time trying to figure out how to get the sealed type connectors opened. There is only ONE tab (despite what I thought) and they can be a little troublesome to pull apart since the seals create a bit of suction. Here is the one tab you need to lift up on (arrow)... Sealed Connectors TRICK - You will also need to disconnect the stator to regulator/rectifier 3P connector on the right hand side. Once it is disconnect tape a string or wire securely to the end. This way when you pull the stator off the left side to the bike the string/wire will follow --- this will help you to pull the new stator wire back through the engine "V" later. Stator plug taped to wire - prior to pulling With all the connector undone you can get to work on the left side case cover. You'll want to put a rag down to catch any oil that spills out - I only lost about 1/4 cup and my engine oil level was still good at the end to this repair. With the bolts removed carefully pry the left side cover off. The magnets in the flywheel want to hold the cover on as does the gasket. I managed to find a couple of tabs that I could get the screwdriver behind and pry on - just go slowly and work the cover evenly off the aligning dowels. You shouldn't have any problems. With the cover removed my stator looked like this... Toasty stator In comparison the new stator looks like this... Old stator (left) and new stator Remove the old stator, clean the old gasket material off the cover, replace the stator and torque to specs. TIP - Placing the rubber wire grommet into the cover was a bit of a stretch no matter how I tried. For a while I thought that the grommet was in the wrong place and too close to the stator. In the end I just worked the grommet into place as I tightened down the wire keeper and then tightend down the stator. If you are replacing the flywheel - read on. Remove the single bolt holding the flywheel in place. To do this you will need something to stop the flywheel from turning (engine compression won't do it). I used a cheap strap wrench. Cheap flywheel wrench Next, Honda specifies a flywheel puller in the Service Manual. It is nothing more than a correctly threaded bolt with arms that can be hammered on. The "bolt" threads into the end of the flywheel and presses against the end of the tapered shaft that the flywheel sits on. Hammering on the "bolt's arms" caused the bolt to push against the shaft and force the flywheel off the shaft. Flywheel Puller TIP - Bring your new flywheel into a machine shop and have your own "puller" built. TRICK - Service Honda lists the tool as a "PULLER DYNAMO" and sells it for $16.46 USD. My rental puller cost me $10 so it's probably worth the extra $6.50 to have the correct tool for the job - you can alway rent it out to your VFR buddies for a case of beer and you'll end up way ahead!! Flywheel with rented puller.jpg Here is a close-up. If you do use this method you will need a puller that can fit through the center of the flywheel and push against the end of the tapered shaft. The end on this puller was about 5/8" and fit through nicely without going inside the tapered shaft or damaging the threads on the flywheel (my flywheel will be replaced with the kit anyway but no sense doing a bunch of damage). Those holes in the flywheel are also quite small so you'll want very small arms on the puller. I had to place each arm into their respective holes and then reattach them to the body of the puller. Flywheel with rented puller close-up.jpg When you have the flywheel removed clean off any stuck on gasket being careful not to let any get into the engine. It should look like this... Leftside crankcase empty.jpg Apply a thin film of oil to the tapered shaft then slide the new flywheel on and torque it into place using the flywheel wrench to keep it from spinning. There is no shear pin or key - it's just a friction fit. Cheap flywheel wrench Now apply sealant to the specified locations (I gave a thin coat all the way around), place the gasket on the dowel pins, more sealant, then replace the cover with the new stator installed and torque to specs - tightening in a criss cross pattern. TIP - In this case the specs on the bolts aren't published in Chapter 17 of the Honda Service Manual. Instead look in Chapter 1 - General Information page 1-12 to find the "Standard Torque Values". TRICK - I read that someone cracked their cover by using the bolts to pull it into place. This is because the magnets in the flywheel want to pull everything out of alignment and the cover was not properly seated on the dowel pins. I used some rod to help align the stator cover. An even better solution would be to buy a couple of bolts about 2-4 inches longer than the cover bolts. Take those extra long bolts and cut the heads off and you'll have some aligning studs. Thread the studs in, place the cover on the studs and then slide the cover into place. Remove the aligning studs a "Bobs your Uncle". Rods to help guide case cover while installing Once everything is torqued in place, pull your new stator wire back through the engine "V" using your string/wire (you may need to fiddle a bit with it). Then reconnect all the electrical plugs - might as well add some dielectric grease to them while your at it. Replace the radiator overflow bottle and reattach your fairings. Check your oil and start her up. To get the full benefit of your the new alternator you should really upgrade the remainder of the charging system --- check out Electrical Upgrade - How To With Pics. The last thing I added was a voltmeter to monitor the situation. You can see it here at Lascar Voltmeter Install Pics. NOTE - most of the tips and tricks came from this website in various posts and references. Thanks for all your help.
  7. talus

    Stator Change

    2002 VFR w ABS - Alternator kit install
  8. Sounds good - 12 Gauge will be fine. I posted a how-to on this subject - rolling everyones ideas into one big article here... "Electrical Upgrade - How To With Pics"
  9. Definitely - add the voltmeter! Although I have to point out that the little Lascar voltmeter that I use onboard updates so quickly that I see the numbers bouncing from 13.9 to 15.1 Volts. I'm positive that these are very momentary peaks and troughs - since my "Meterman" voltmeter show a rock steady 14.29 - 14.51 Volts. I don't think it can be any better. Thanks for all the complements - it was really all of your idea's rolled into one! t
  10. Oops.... My bad. Voltage should have read 14.3 - 14.5 .... dyslexia.
  11. Here is my version of "beef up 'dem 'dare wires!". This mod/upgrade is meant to fix any under OR overcharging problems, and improve the Regulator/Rectifier (R/R) to battery charging wires and grounds. It was done to a 2002 VFR but years 2002-2005 should have the same wiring harness. This was my 30 Amp fuse wire problem: Toasted 30 Amp fuse wire Followed shortly by a fried stator to R/R 3P connector (to be fair these two problems may not have been related): Totally melted white connector block - located on right hand side under fairing Here is what you'll need: 12 Gauge wire (red and green - nice festive colors) 16 Gauge wire (black - goes with anything) 6 Gauge 1/4" lug (or any lug will fits on your battery terminal and is large enough to take 3 - 12 Ga wires and 1 - 16 Ga wire) 1/4" ring terminal (large enough to crimp in 2 - 12 Gauge wires) Connectors of your choice (female spade and Posi-Lock connectors shown - www.posi-products.com) 12 Gauge in-line fuse (this will be your replacement for the toasty 30 Amp fuse) Fuse block (not shown) - or 3 more in-line fuses Solder Gun Torch Solder Shrink Tube Tape Supplies Here is the final result (note that I re-used my factory 30 amp fuse only because I screwed this mod up the first time): Finished product How to: First of all, I tried the "How To: Replace 30amp Fuse Wires, Charred 30amp fuse wires" post and succeed in mangling the positive post cable connector. There was absolutely no way I was getting that battery terminal de-soldered or pried off. In the end I ordered a new harness and just reused my old 30 Amp fuse holder. *Leave everything on your factory battery harness as is. If you want you can repair the toasty 30 Amp wire and use that lead to power something but I'm not going to use it here. Strip and twist together 3 - 12 Ga wires (red) and 1 - 16 Ga wire (black) - about 18 inches each or enough to reach wherever you place your fuse block. 6 Ga 1/4 inch Lug and wires - ready to solder Ready your 6 Ga lug with some solder cut and placed inside it. The first time I did this I used vice grips to hold the lug but I found that they soak up so much heat that it takes a while to get lug hot and the solder melted. The next time I did it I clamped the lug in between some wood - the lug heats up very quickly this way! Stand the lug up vertically so you can heat it with your torch and melt the solder - creating a pool of solder inside the lug. With the solder still liquid, jam the 4 wires that you grouped together into hot solder and hold the wires there until the solder cools. I suppose you could crimp the lug at this point but mine was a nice fit. 6 Ga 1/4 inch Lug Add some shrink tubing and your ready to test fit in the bike. I found there was more space around the back side of the battery - opposite the factory harness. 2 of the reds wires and the 1 black go to the fuse block. The other red wire gets an inline fuse and goes to the factory connector to the bike (where you disconnected the toasty section of the 30 Amp wire from - just seen in the top right side of the following picture). Battery Side - before tape Next you'll need to remove your R/R. Kanadian Ken shows you how to do it here -- 6th Gen Monitor Wire Fix. I'll cover the monitor wire fix also. Remove the 6 pin connector so that you can get at the 2 red charging wires and the 2 green ground wires (see Kens post on how to remove the spade connectors - a small jewelers screwdriver does the trick). R/R 6P connector removed Here is the point of no return - where you modify the a factory piece - but hey it's only the R/R and that seems to need replacing on a regular basis anyway :rolleyes: . Using 2 - 12 Ga (red wires - about 36 inches each) and 2 - 12 Ga (green wires - about 24 inches each) wires, I made "button hook" connections (covered on the forum somewhere?) to the charge and ground wires of the R/R. To do that, you'll want to strip off about 3/4 inch of insulation from each of the factory R/R wires (the green and red ones). Then using my jewelers screwdriver, I opened up the factory wires in the center so that I could pass the new 12 gauge wire through. Once the new wire was through the hole I split the 12 gauge wire in two parts and twisted them tightly around the outside of the factory wire - closing the hole up. Then I soldered the connection and finished with tape. Finally, fit the spade connectors back into the 6P plug, but leave the black "monitor" wire out. Button hook connections If I had to do it over again I would remove the factory black insulation jacket to about half way beween the 6P plug and the R/R and make my connection there. This would keep the mess of connections farther away from all the plugs and allow straighter wire runs. Just look at your R/R when it's on the bike and you'll see how much room is over the radiator - this would be a better place to make those connections. Reattach the R/R and route your wires. Wire routing on right hand side I initially made my connections to the R/R charge wires with Posi-Taps. However, they are quite large and there wasn't enough room for 4 of them. Another issue is that they come off at a 90 degree angle which is fine if it works for you. Lastly the posi-taps only make the connection with a small needle point and this seemed like a bit of a choke point to me. Here is a picture before I removed them, you can see the small hole they make ... FYI - Posi-Tap connectors - later removed Instead I used the Posi-Lock straight connectors which make a nice solid, beefy connection - and they are removable (so I could pull the whole harness out to show you guys). *You will also notice that the Black "sensing wire" was NOT put back into the 6P plug. It gets some shrink tube on it's rather long blade and then gets connected to a spade connector and run to the fuse block. New charge and ground wires Next, to attached the new ground wires, I crimped on a ring terminal and then added soldered for security. Since the grounds were a such a short run I didn't bother making a disconnect. I did wonder if I should run the grounds all the way back to the main frame ground (under the fuel tank) but after taking some resistance reading it would not have made a difference. The grounds hook up to the bolt that holds the fairing offset. New charge and ground wires taped Then I measured and cut my wires from the battery and from the R/R to the fuse block. The fuse block is a nice little "Hella Splash Proof 4 Gang ATC Fuse Block, Spade Side Connectors HL62936". It was about $12 at the independent NAPA dealer here. Of course you could just use some inline fuses to do the job as well. Stolen Webpic of HL62936 Hella Splash Proof 4 Gang ATC Fuse Block, Spade Side The one thing that I didn't like about the fuse block was that the base was open. I simply took some silicone and sealed it up - the top cover has a little gasket to keep water out. It's a pretty tight fit - I even used some pla-doh to check the clearance between the top of the fuse box and the seat - VERY tight. Fuse Block - close up Fuse Block Fuse Block - side With all the wires in place I then taped everything and zip-tied it into place. I also made sure to put dielectric grease on everything - new or old. If you want to reverse this mod (lets say for warranty reasons) you'll need to cut the wires from the R/R or buy a new R/R and then simply remove the harness. Battery Side - routed behind battery Taped and routed In the end my beefed up charging system now has three routes - 1 factory routing and 2 re-enforced routings direct from the R/R. The grounds from the R/R are beefed up and redundant which should hopefully help. And finally, running the the black monitor wire directly to the battery solves any issues with resistance in the ignition circuit causing overcharging. I haven't quite decided on what size fuses to use in the charging wires - I started with 25 amp then switched to 20 Amp fuses. Stock RR and Suggested Rewired RR My charging voltage is stable at 13.4 to 13.5 (edit - must have been drinking when I wrote that) 14.3 to 14.5 volts with high or low beams on, from idle all the way up and I am much more confidant with the electrics now. The last thing I added was a voltmeter to monitor the situation. You can see it here at Lascar Voltmeter Install Pics.
  12. talus

    Stator Tests

    Give me a day to get the pics together. I want to show the electrical reinforcement as well. There is a great write-up on stator replacements (Maintenance - Stator Replacement). For your 2002 (and newer) you should also read the service bulletin (Six Gen - 2002 Alternator Recall) and of course review the Service manual (Downloads) That should keep you busy while you wait for the parts. Don't worry about this job - it's no more difficult than changing the oil - just a couple of extra bolts. Finding an appropriate puller and the two torque wrenches will be more difficult than the job. I need one "low" torque wrench for the case bolts and one "high" torque wrench for the flywheel bolt. Bring the torque specs when you go to buy/rent it will save you and extra trip :beer:. BTW the guys at the local dealer tell me they just "guestimate" the case bolt torque - I didn't have the guts. I think that the flywheel gets replaced due to a stator/flywheel clearance issue. --- At least I seem to remember reading that somewhere around here.
  13. talus

    Lascar Voltmeter Install

    Lascar Voltmeter Install on VFR
  14. talus

    interceptor.jpg

    What make and size of bags have you got on the back? They look great.
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