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HughJebolzak

Tire puncture opinions.

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4 minutes ago, HughJebolzak said:

I got a tire repair kit and pulled the object out of my tire. It looks like part of a pallet staple or similar. It's so narrow that the reaming tool and the tire repair needle will not fit into the hole. Unfortunately it looks like I should I try to enlarge the hole somehow. Recommendations? 

tire_staple.jpg

When I did a repair on the road the punctureing object went in at an angle. And the puncture hole was much smaller that the rope plug. I had to ream the hole larger with the rough-edged screwdriver look-a-like in the top of the picture.

Good luck with your repair. Please post up your results.

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That thing won't go in the hole. Mind you the tire was flat within less than a minute. I'm wondering if I should take a drill bit to it. Not that I want to mind you.😬

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48 minutes ago, HughJebolzak said:

That thing won't go in the hole. Mind you the tire was flat within less than a minute. I'm wondering if I should take a drill bit to it. Not that I want to mind you.😬

I had to forcibly jam it in the hole effectively enlarging the punch hole. It took considerable elbow grease.

 

Here is a detailed explaination I've come across. https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/how-to-repair-a-flat-tire-on-the-road

 

The tire repair kit I carry also has instructions. https://www.aerostich.com/a-to-b-utilities/tools/tire-repair/tire-repair-kits/aerostich-tube-and-tubeless-tire-repair-kit.html

 

And I carry a mini compressor to reinflate the tire. I bought mine from Aerostich. https://www.aerostich.com/a-to-b-utilities/tools/tire-repair/pumps-air-compressors/aerostich-mini-compressor.html

 

Good luck.

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Extract the tools from their cheezey handles and then chuck them up in your cordless drill this will give you more power to ream the hole and more power the push the plug in... stand over the puncture at the 12 O Clock position so you push down with your whole body...

 

DrillPoweredTireTools.JPG

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I a similar size nail puncture my rear tire last weekend. I have put 3 plugs but it’s still leaking air. I wonder if an internal plug is my only chance at this point to resurrect this tire?

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inside plug patch is the only "safe' way to repair.

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30 minutes ago, squirrelman said:

inside plug patch is the only "safe' way to repair.

Oh no, not this again

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18 hours ago, Tiutis said:

I a similar size nail puncture my rear tire last weekend. I have put 3 plugs but it’s still leaking air. I wonder if an internal plug is my only chance at this point to resurrect this tire?

If I were in this situation I'd consider the tire burnt toast. Chalk the price pain up to the great feelings new tires can bring to your riding.

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37 minutes ago, MaxSwell said:

If I were in this situation I'd consider the tire burnt toast. Chalk the price pain up to the great feelings new tires can bring to your riding.

Yeah, I’d be always worried about riding with patched up tire anyways.

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22 hours ago, Tiutis said:

I a similar size nail puncture my rear tire last weekend. I have put 3 plugs but it’s still leaking air. I wonder if an internal plug is my only chance at this point to resurrect this tire?

 

The problem with an inside combi plug is finding a tire shop willing to take on the liability for such little profit...

Steps they risk of not getting it right and being sued if it things go wrong...

 

1) Remove wheel from bike...
2) Remove tire from wheel...
3) Break out the power tools and prepare carcass in accordance to
instructions and don't forget the special cleaner...

4). Apply glue to the reamer pushed through the hole after buffing/cleaning...

5) Insert combi plug and employ pliers to pull it through, employ pizza roller to press patch flat, trim excess...
6) Install tire on wheel and Rebalance the tire and wheel...

7)Install wheel on bike...
8)Inflate tire to proper PSI and leak check...

 

I'm afraid liability is a real problem for it holds back many a good people from helping...
consequently the task shifts back to DIY 3 step self vulcanizing rope to resurrect the tire...

 

1) Ream hole with tool provided in the kit...
2) Insert rope with tool provided in the kit and trim excess...
3) Inflate tire to proper PSI...

 

8 steps for an inside combi plug...

attachment.php?attachmentid=481999&stc=1
attachment.php?attachmentid=504263&d=151

 

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22 hours ago, squirrelman said:

inside plug patch is the only "safe' way to repair.

I disagree... even when I "Clean, grind, clean, ream, glue, wait, glue,
wait, apply, seal, trim." a inside mushroom plug... there is
the problem of consistency that I can not guarantee it will stay
stuck... where as the self vulcanizing rope stays stuck even if I
allow the customer to install it themselves...

 

Technically speaking the inside patch is solely dependent on a bond
between a plug company's material and the tire manufacture's rubber
compound... thats a crap shoot the two chemical compounds are
compatible enough to hold a bond when the rubber is stationary and at
room temperature... but tires are elastic bodies designed to flex from
completely round to completely flat at every rotation... every
rotation builds heat that works against that bond... every rotation
flexes that mushroom patch from round to flat that works against that
bond.... so we have heat coupled with flex working against the two
competing chemical bonds from being as consistence as a self
vulcanizing rope plug installed from the outside...

 

Staying stuck and holding air is all you can ask for in a plug
installed by the masses...
1367272268_68c4474380_o.jpg

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2 hours ago, Tiutis said:

Yeah, I’d be always worried about riding with patched up tire anyways.

For some riders tire plugs are unsafe... they would spend too much
attention on the plug and not enough on where they're going and what
they're are doing... it short it's a barrier for which only a new
tire can solve... so even thought they find the right words
to express their fear... I still respect their choice...

 

I think we all can agree that riding is all about over coming
barriers... whether psychological... (I feel like I'm going too fast)
to mechanical... (my rev limiter kicked in)...

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2 hours ago, BusyLittleShop said:

I think we all can agree that riding is all about over coming
barriers... whether psychological... (I feel like I'm going too fast)
to mechanical... (my rev limiter kicked in)...

Amen to that; you can only ride as fast as you feel comfortable and confident. If there is a nagging doubt in the back of your mind that all is not well, it is better to address that than keep riding.

 

And thanks for the rational discussion about plugs vs internal patches. The photo of the expanded plug inside the tyre was a clincher for me, I confess the last puncture that I had caused me to visit my tyre vendor and get an internal mushroom installed. 

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5 hours ago, BusyLittleShop said:

I'm afraid liability is a real problem for it holds back many a good people from helping...
consequently the task shifts back to DIY 3 step self vulcanizing rope to resurrect the tire...

 

My local tire shop absolutely refused via phone call to repair a nearly new PR4 with a center-of-tread puncture several years ago.  I wanted him to do it because they had repaired several car tires for me over the years with zero issues using a combination patch/plug.   I took the tire off the wheel and went over anyway.  The owner said, "I told you we won't do motorcycle tires."   I replied, "This tire has less than 1,000 miles on it.   It is getting repaired whether you do it or I do it.   I would rather a professional do it."   I continued, "Let's make this a cash transaction with no receipt and I was never here."   In a huff, he said OK and repaired the tire while walking me through the steps.   After he was done he refused my cash and reinforced, "You were never here."  I put another 9,000 miles on that tire with zero issues.

 

I should really buy a box of Xtra Seal combis, a reamer, burnisher, solvent and cement but they would probably go stale before I needed another. 

 

image.png.ea34b323d0ab2294569f106f2c8a8fbb.png

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21 hours ago, Terry said:

And thanks for the rational discussion about plugs vs internal patches. The photo of the expanded plug inside the tyre was a clincher for me, I confess the last puncture that I had caused me to visit my tyre vendor and get an internal mushroom installed. 

You're welcome...

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Each to their own, but if you are stuck in a foreign country on a Sunday with a nail stuck out of your tire, all reservations about safe repair or not will disappear. Been there done that and now I carry a stop and go kit to do my own roadside repairs.

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It doesn't have to be another country.

I could be 50 miles from home and out of cell phone coverage.

Not much difference.

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I plugged it with the string type and will give it a road test tomorrow. So far it's holding air just fine and I anticipate no further problems.

Because the hole was so small, I ran a 1/8 inch drill bit through and was only then able to get the rasping tool and the string inserting tool into the hole. I could hear some steel belts crunching / breaking as I did so and that didn't give me a warm and fuzzy feeling.

If I were to do it over, I would have inserted more string into the hole as I ended up cutting about 3/4 of an inch off of the part left hanging (two bits at 3/8 each). That's after leaving a quarter inch to be worn off by the road as per instructions.

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I've been mounting, balancing, and repaired many flats for 10 years now.  Installed almost 1000 tires now.  I've seen many tires that were repaired with the "sticky rope".  When I asked the owner of the tire about the repair in the tire, many of them have said they picked up a nail while on a ride a few years ago and never had another problem with it so they left it in until the tread was worn down.  The sticky rope works very good as long as it's fresh and has not been dried out.  If you brought your tire to me to be fixed I'd remove the tire from the wheel and install the 2" diameter patch with the rubber stem pulled through the puncture.  With a small puncture right in the middle of the tread I'd have no problem or reservations repairing this tire. I would advise you to watch the air pressure for a couple of weeks, daily checks to make sure the patch is doing it's job and the speed rating of the tire is no longer valid...take it easy on the tire, NO track days of course.   

Regarding the Stop N Go "mushroom plugs" that are inserted from the outside and expand to a mushroom head on the inside, they are no good.  I've heard reports on other forums they come out.

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