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JimMoore

Sprocket Change?

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Hi Guys,

 

Coming from a few pure sportbikes my new-to-me 98 VFR800 feels a little over-geared. FOREX it's geared to go almost 150 in 4th gear. And it will get there, but man it takes forever. Has anyone experimented with different sprockets? I think the stock setup is 17/43. The standard sportbike trick is to go -1/+2, but I can't find a 45T rear, so I'm thinking about doing a -1/+1.  has anyone tried that? Did you like it?

 

Thanks,

 

Jim Moore

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27 minutes ago, JimMoore said:

Hi Guys,

 

Coming from a few pure sportbikes my new-to-me 98 VFR800 feels a little over-geared. FOREX it's geared to go almost 150 in 4th gear. And it will get there, but man it takes forever. Has anyone experimented with different sprockets? I think the stock setup is 17/43. The standard sportbike trick is to go -1/+2, but I can't find a 45T rear, so I'm thinking about doing a -1/+1.  has anyone tried that? Did you like it?

 

Thanks,

 

Jim Moore

Jim, not sure where you looked but the 45T rears are available - https://sprocketcenter.com/street-sprocket-applications/honda/vfr-800-1998-2001.html

 

I agree with your thoughts and when I installed a new chain and sprockets I went with 17/45T and also a 520 conversion. I like it, I'd almost gear it a little lower to be honest, it still seems like a lot of gearing for street riding.

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I agree with the gearing change, and I also bought my 45 tooth at Sprocket Center. And I'm also running the 17 tooth front.

I will say it affected my gas mileage not a whit, if anything it may have improved at highway speeds. I use a bicycle computer

so I can have an accurate speedometer.

 

I'm not too sure how I'd feel about going down a tooth in the front, might be a bit too much for me. But there is no doubt

the VFR is way overgeared.

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Thanks guys. How are those Superlite sprockets holding up? I read that as "not lasting very long." I was hoping to find a steel sprocket in 45T.

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Unless I'm mistaken, wouldn't -1/+2 make for a 15/45 gear ratio? Stock is 16/43 (at least on a 6th gen).

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14 minutes ago, TheLimey said:

Unless I'm mistaken, wouldn't -1/+2 make for a 15/45 gear ratio? Stock is 16/43 (at least on a 6th gen).

I believe one trick is to get a OEM 6th Gen front for a 1 tooth smaller but still "stock" front sprocket with the rubber bumper thingy's on them. As mentioned by the OP 17/43 on 5G.

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1 hour ago, JimMoore said:

Thanks guys. How are those Superlite sprockets holding up? I read that as "not lasting very long." I was hoping to find a steel sprocket in 45T.

unless it's a race bike, alloy sprockets are a poor choice as they wear more than twice as fast as steel.

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1 hour ago, JimMoore said:

Thanks guys. How are those Superlite sprockets holding up? I read that as "not lasting very long." I was hoping to find a steel sprocket in 45T.

The superlites at the top of the page I linked are steel, fyi. Mine is holding up fine but I only have a couple thousand miles on them so far. Maybe someone else can chime in that has used a few sets of them up.

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I only went +1 in the back when I did the new chain and sprockets, not very noticeable (rpms are a little higher at highway speeds).  Next time I'm going -1 in the front.

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The 45 tooth I got from Sprocket Center was steel.

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I'm running a stock 6th gen 16T front, I like the gearing a lot more but I should add a speedo healer as the speedo is pretty happy.  Next chain+sprockets I'll switch the gearing to a larger rear and 17T front for a longer-wearing system.  I'm not concerned about the chain and sprocket mass.  More teeth and less scrunch to the chain up front makes for longer life.

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I just did the front sprocket change on my 2014 VFR 800, I dropped it one tooth from a 16 tooth to a 15 tooth. Took it for a test ride today, didn't notice a change until I stabbed the throttle in first and it stood up. I love it !  I wasted $109.00 dollars on a speedo healer. The speed sensor is on the front wheel, so therefore you don't need the healer.

 

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9 hours ago, jrmotorsports38 said:

I just did the front sprocket change on my 2014 VFR 800, I dropped it one tooth from a 16 tooth to a 15 tooth. Took it for a test ride today, didn't notice a change until I stabbed the throttle in first and it stood up. I love it !  I wasted $109.00 dollars on a speedo healer. The speed sensor is on the front wheel, so therefore you don't need the healer.

 

Do you have any issue with the Gear Position Indicator? Speed sensing is off the rear wheel ABS sensor on the 8gen. Hope you can at least sell the speed healer for a good price, enjoy the quicker acceleration. You need to post a picture of your bike. Welcome to the forum. 

Cheers. 

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Hi to all.

The choice is strictly constrained to the usual use.

I'm in Italy and the stock ratio for the my roads and highways are good enough.

Yes, i think that it's a little bit overgeared, but the engine torque helps and i really never needed to change sprockets and/or gears.

More, the speedometer reads the sensor fitted on sprocket cover, if you change something in final transmission enforce you to install a device as the Healtech speed corrector.

In conclusion, yes, maybe the stock final transmission is overgeared but i think that the work and conseguences of a ratio reduction don't worth the results.

 

Ciao, Luigi.   

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They are so worth it, lower final drive ratio makes the bike so much more responsive on the throttle regardless of gear or revs. 

Lowering the gearing makes the most of the torque available to us. I run 16/45 or 16/44 most of the time on my 5th gen.

 

 

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On 7/3/2019 at 10:44 AM, adkfinn said:

Jim, not sure where you looked but the 45T rears are available - https://sprocketcenter.com/street-sprocket-applications/honda/vfr-800-1998-2001.html

 

I agree with your thoughts and when I installed a new chain and sprockets I went with 17/45T and also a 520 conversion. I like it, I'd almost gear it a little lower to be honest, it still seems like a lot of gearing for street riding.

Any thoughts on the 520 conversion? Have you had it for long? How is it holding up? I'd ask if you felt a difference, but I'm sure the gearing change was more significant in that respect.

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3 hours ago, Marvelicious said:

Any thoughts on the 520 conversion? Have you had it for long? How is it holding up? I'd ask if you felt a difference, but I'm sure the gearing change was more significant in that respect.

You are correct, the gear change was noticeable and due to that I can't attest to changes felt moving from 530 to 520 since it happened at the same time. I have about 1k mi on the new 520 setup and I will say that it performs just fine, no issues. I think that DID specs the chain I am using for bikes up to 1200cc, so our little, 20+ year old 782cc is well within the chain's tolerance, even comically so. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, adkfinn said:

You are correct, the gear change was noticeable and due to that I can't attest to changes felt moving from 530 to 520 since it happened at the same time. I have about 1k mi on the new 520 setup and I will say that it performs just fine, no issues. I think that DID specs the chain I am using for bikes up to 1200cc, so our little, 20+ year old 782cc is well within the chain's tolerance, even comically so. 

 

 

That's about what I figured. I did a little searching, but most of what I found was the NEVER DEVIATE FROM HONDA FACTORY SPEC crowd recommending against it. Chain wear is such a non-issue with an automatic oiler that I won't need a chain any time soon, but I've been tempted to go for a gearing change (thinking 16/45) and I'm kinda thinking why not go 520?

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I forgot to add that I run a 520 chain now too. I did run 525 for about 8 years, but there are a larger choice of sprockets for my QD hub in 520 so last year I changed to 520 chain. There is no real difference in strength to the 5xx chains, as the side plates determine the strength & a short pin by any measure is always stronger than a long one of the same diameter. If race teams can run 1000cc 200hp machines flat out on 520, then your average VFR will not strain them !  

 

Here’s a useful video explaining it.

 

A standard 520 is lower strength due to thinner side plates as they are normally fitted to smaller capacity bikes, with less weight & power. So make sure you get one of the high tensile strength ones. But saving over 0.5Kg of weight from the rotating parts is an easy win 🙂

 

As always YMMV depending on chain maintenance.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Marvelicious said:

 but I've been tempted to go for a gearing change (thinking 16/45) and I'm kinda thinking why not go 520?

This was exactly where I was at also. I have no regrets about the chain size, the only thing I am still curious about is trying 16/45 next time around, since 17/45 wasn't a drastic change and I think it could be geared a bit lower still. 

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6 hours ago, Mohawk said:

I forgot to add that I run a 520 chain now too. I did run 525 for about 8 years, but there are a larger choice of sprockets for my QD hub in 520 so last year I changed to 520 chain. There is no real difference in strength to the 5xx chains, as the side plates determine the strength & a short pin by any measure is always stronger than a long one of the same diameter. If race teams can run 1000cc 200hp machines flat out on 520, then your average VFR will not strain them !  

 

Here’s a useful video explaining it.

 

A standard 520 is lower strength due to thinner side plates as they are normally fitted to smaller capacity bikes, with less weight & power. So make sure you get one of the high tensile strength ones. But saving over 0.5Kg of weight from the rotating parts is an easy win 🙂

 

As always YMMV depending on chain maintenance.

 

 

Your video didn't seem to load, but it's a pretty simple concept. The wider chain does net you a bit more contact area between chain and sprocket, so if you procrastinate on your chain lubrication, I can see the argument for 530... otherwise, game on! Thanks for the input

39 minutes ago, adkfinn said:

This was exactly where I was at also. I have no regrets about the chain size, the only thing I am still curious about is trying 16/45 next time around, since 17/45 wasn't a drastic change and I think it could be geared a bit lower still. 

Yep... I have the stock 6th gen gearing (16/43) and while the bike never really lacks for power (I went for a long loop with my buddy on his new Z900RS the other day, and I made him work to follow me all morning... 😆 ), I'm way too old, fat and slow to use top speed. I don't know if the 5th gens suffer as much from the touchy throttle of the 6th at very low speeds, but it seems like lower gearing would allow less throttle input at low speed. It's not a huge issue, and I've definitely adjusted to it, but this bike is always a bit of a chore to ride in town.

 

Hopefully JimMoore doesn't mind my thread hijack... it all seems fairly relevant to his question.

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A lot of times getting the 525 or 520 is easier anyways since it's popular with the sport bikes. I had a heck of a time finding the 530 stock chains and sprockets on my vn800 so I went with 525.

A thought on the alloy rear sprockets: they wear 2-3 times faster than the steel sprockets but since it spins 3 times slower than the front, that would make wear similar between the two. Since I figure I might as well tackle them both while over got the bike in the air, it works out well. If you like doing front and rear separate, get the long life ones, just remember to check your front.

By the way, thanks for having my at the forums. Just bought a 98 vfr800 to add to me collection.

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Try gearing commander to see the benefits of different gearing & how it affects rpm etc.

 

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