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VFR80025th

After my last chain slack adjustment I'm now at replace chain mark:

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I do want to change the chain as well as sprockets but after my last adjustment and clean and lube I'd like to get all the life out of the chain that I can.

I know its at the replace chain marking on the swingarm (Due to stretching) but is this dangerous if I continue to ride with it or do I need to replace it ASAP.

Thxs & Ride safe.

Edited by VFR80025th

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Can you pull a chain link away from the back of the rear sprocket?

How worn are the teeth? got pics?

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How many miles do you have on it? How often do you lube it? Are you the owner that put the chain on?

What size sprockets are you running? If you're running different sizes than OEM the chain could show

that it needs to be replaced before it's actually due.

 

Yep, pics are a help.

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Can't take pics right now due to bike in front of car in garage.now but I lube around every 600kms and clean every 1000kms.

Teeth on rear sprocket look decent.  I definitely cannot pull chain away from rear sprocket at all. I have 25,800kms on the bike.

It is oem chain and sprockets.

 

But as I said sprocket is now in position where it indicates to replace chain.

I'd like to finsih off season with this chain and sprockets and then change it out before storage.

 

Thxs

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The chain shouldn't be worn out if you are maintaining like you describe. That's only about 16,000 miles, so you should be good for at least

6,500 kms, and maybe another 8000 kms after that. 40,000 kms isn't unusual if the chain is well maintained.

 

OTOH how do you clean the chain? Some cleaners may attack the O-rings, and if you're using a pressure washer or car wash high pressure

spray wand, all bets are off.

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I'm using kerosene to clean and Motul C2 chain lube.

Don't know how previous owner lubed. I bought it with 17,400kms and it has 25,800kms currently.

I have never ridden it in the rain. Don't intend to.

Garage kept and washed once by hand when I bought it.

Since then I just Detail the VFR before every weekend ride, Its practically showroom condition.

I'm not sure I will be able to adjust the chain for slack due to the position of the rear wheel and sprocket.

I will keep it clean and lubed and hope the slack stays in check and I hope to replace near end of summer.

My only concern is the sprocket is at the mark where it indicates to replace chain due to adjustments and chain stetching I would think.

Does that sound reasonable.

Thxs

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I got 94600kms out of my original chain. I do think you are ovrr thinking your problem.

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Over 58,000 miles from one chain? Even with a Scott Oiler that seems like a very large number.

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Yeah there is no way. Please provide pictures 🙂

 

OP, don’t overthink it. If the chain doesn’t fail the OEM “spacing between link pins” wear limit, it is fine. On other bikes I believe you measure a few links from pin to pin. I’m sorry I don’t have a diagram I am at work on break. Chains stretch the most when new and when they are worn out, so keep an eye on the chain slack. 

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3 hours ago, FJ12Ryder said:

Over 58,000 miles from one chain? Even with a Scott Oiler that seems like a very large number.

I can assure you it is the true figure. The chain itsrlf was not too bad but the front sprocket was on its way to being a Death Star. A Scottoiler was indeed used.

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62,000 miles on my last chain. No fancy Scott

 

OP: Keep adjusting till you can't, then buy new.

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I've spent several decades with chain-driven bikes, from a lawnmotor-powered minibike, through my 6th gen, and then had a few 7th gen years to think about and research chains while I rode my wonderfully maintenance-free shaft drive 7th gen (OK, except the recall...). Now, I own two (yeah!) chain drive bikes. I'm a slow learner, but this is what I've learned:

 

I over-tightened and over-chain lubed. I didn't leave enough slack (more generally I am trying very hard not to over tighten everything, gradually succeeding 😕), and all that extra lube did nothing. These are sealed o-ring chains, the lube is only necessary to help the roller meet the sprockets. A bit of lube every 500 miles or so does the job.

 

I undercleaned. It's mainly the grit that kills the chain. Use WD40 or something similar as a cleaning agent, regularly, using a brush such as Tirox, which I really like, see photo, remove as much dirt and grit as possible, wipe down with rag and/or spray gently with a hose, and lay on a bit of lube on the rollers. Wipe off the excess lube.

 

As always YMMV.

IMG_4011.jpg

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I agree ^ People either over oil or under oil a chain. But it's that nasty salt damage and rusting and dusting that eats them alive... which a little extra chain grease does help last.

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Don't use WD40, it ruins the o-rings.

 

Kerosene is best. Liquid paraphin it's often called... or parafin or however you spell it.

 

Dense, thick, sticky greases trap all those grinding agents (dust, dirt, salt, grit, etc) in the chain and together make for perfect accelerated wear and tear.

 

A more fluid or thinner lubricant used more frequently is best.

 

Also as a previous poster mentioned, perhaps that sticker was not calibrated to your original set up, and anyway it's an extremely inaccurate measuring device... how do you know you're observing it from exactly the correct angle?

 

As another previous poster said (and both posters mentioned are trusted long term members here), keep adjusting until the eccentric won't give you any more adjustment and remember a slightly slack chain will last much longer than a slightly overtight one.

 

 

 

 

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BTW, fix the spelling in your thread's title... and try to keep titles concise, short and sweet, relevant key words... Helps future searches for info

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I'd like to thanks everyone for chiming in.

I will keep the chain lubed and clean and if I can no longer adjust for slack before end of year I will replace the chain and sprockets.

Much thxs.

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