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adkfinn

adkfinn's 5th gen 20yr refresh

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13 hours ago, adkfinn said:

Thoughts and questions - Will the full oil cooler and lines from the 6th gen fit right up to the 5th Gen? This seems like it might be the way to go... snag an extra row of cooling capacity and newer/more readily available lines. Can anyone confirm? 

 

Also, I noticed that the 8th Gen oil cooler is much bigger, has anyone tried to fit that sucker? I would imagine you'd struggle to make it play nice with the cooling hose and headers without some a very custom mount or more serious work. 

The 6th Gen oil cooler pipes are a completely different shape so I don't see how they'll fit without some specialist bending tool use. The OEM oil cooler is fine. I don't see the need to change it for something bigger - seems like an unnecessary 'upgrade' where the effort expended won't provide a worthwhile result. You may be better off removing the oil cooler and straightening out any bent fins if it's a problem.

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On 6/8/2018 at 6:17 PM, M1962 said:

The oil cooler pipes may be a problem and a replacement would have to be fabricated to fit both the sump and the oil cooler. Mine were absolutely shot to pieces - they were originally chromed and it had flaked off leaving a rusty ugly mess. The crimped joints to the flexible hoses were also manky and discoloured. The solution? I scoured fleabay and got a pair from a breaker in the US, so no rust, in good condition, and cost me a fraction of a new part.

Why not blast and powdercoat the hoses you’ve got? I took mine to the sandblasted and sprayed them black. Look like new! 

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15 minutes ago, Stray said:

Why not blast and powdercoat the hoses you’ve got? I took mine to the sandblasted and sprayed them black. Look like new! 

 

That is essentially what I have just decided. I grabbed a used set off of fleabay this am and will be blasting them and sending them to a friend for powdercoating (in an attempt to achieve the longest lasting finish I can). 

 

No real updates or progress on the bike since my last update. Life/work/other projects have claimed most of my time the last bunch of days and nights. I am waiting on the master cylinder rebuild kits from Partzilla and am planning on digging into the brakes and clutch in earnest once parts show up the end of this week. 

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On 6/12/2018 at 3:02 PM, Stray said:

Why not blast and powdercoat the hoses you’ve got? I took mine to the sandblasted and sprayed them black. Look like new! 

That's a good idea. I suppose it depends on what 'look' you're going for with a refurbishment. For me I wanted the bike to be as 'factory' as possible, so all the parts I replaced were either OEM or good quality secondhand - like the oil cooler pipes. Mine's still a work in progress after 3 years, but the aim is to get it as close to showroom as possible.

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On 6/9/2018 at 3:21 AM, M1962 said:

The 6th Gen oil cooler pipes are a completely different shape so I don't see how they'll fit without some specialist bending tool use. The OEM oil cooler is fine. I don't see the need to change it for something bigger - seems like an unnecessary 'upgrade' where the effort expended won't provide a worthwhile result. You may be better off removing the oil cooler and straightening out any bent fins if it's a problem.

 

M1962, I did notice they were quite different when I was looking at the 6th Gen oil lines. I still wonder if they would fit.... The engine is the same, the exhaust is the same, it looks like the cooling setup/hoses are very nearly the same.... I may grab a cheap used set some time just to investigate it further. 

 

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On 6/17/2018 at 3:36 PM, adkfinn said:

 

M1962, I did notice they were quite different when I was looking at the 6th Gen oil lines. I still wonder if they would fit.... The engine is the same, the exhaust is the same, it looks like the cooling setup/hoses are very nearly the same.... I may grab a cheap used set some time just to investigate it further. 

 

Adkfinn, someone on this site fitted 6th gen lines to his 5th gen. If memory serves one was a bit of a fight as 6th gen cooler hangs lower (and is bigger) so the newer lines struggle to reach the older cooler. 

 

Anyway, he got them to work in the end. 

 

You could fit a 6th gen cooler (or even better, RC51 cooler) which would be less of a stretch for the shorter 6th gen lines? Just thinking out loud. 

 

Of course it wouldn’t be strictly stock but it is an improvement and I suppose 6th gen lines aren’t stock either on a 5th gen. 

 

Stray 

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20 hours ago, Stray said:

Adkfinn, someone on this site fitted 6th gen lines to his 5th gen. If memory serves one was a bit of a fight as 6th gen cooler hangs lower (and is bigger) so the newer lines struggle to reach the older cooler. 

 

Anyway, he got them to work in the end. 

 

You could fit a 6th gen cooler (or even better, RC51 cooler) which would be less of a stretch for the shorter 6th gen lines? Just thinking out loud. 

 

Of course it wouldn’t be strictly stock but it is an improvement and I suppose 6th gen lines aren’t stock either on a 5th gen. 

 

Stray 

 

This is good info Stray, thank you.

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18 hours ago, KevCarver said:

 

Did you see my 103,400 mile filter? 26k is nothing! 🙂 But it would be interesting to see what yours looks like inside if you decide to cut it open.

 

Kevin - I did see you post about filters and have been enjoying @ducnut 's FB thread on refurb also. I would humor and cut mine open, but it is already gone with the trash. 

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I recently scored an RC49 oil cooler and lines from Japan. The RC49 is the 5th Gen Police bike made from 2001-2008. There are a number of differences between the Police bike and a regular 5th Gen, including the use of a 3-row 'cooler, and - I'm hoping - similar/identical oil lines to the regular 5th-Gen. We'll see when next I do an oil change/have the fairings off, and attempt the swap.

 

I suspect that another Viffer enthusiast has the same idea in mind, as I saw another one on the site I use, and it, too, was snapped up.

 

As for the RC51 'cooler, I also have one of those, and reckon there'd be more mucking around to fit that, as the LHS hose connection is more angled than the Police bike's one or the 6th Gen, as far as I can tell.

 

That said, I'll keep the RC51 cooler for when we - eventually move to a year-round warmer climate.

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just go big

vfr cooler 2.jpg

vfr oil cooler.jpg

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8 minutes ago, keef said:

just go big

vfr cooler 2.jpg

vfr oil cooler.jpg

Personally, I like it! That said, I'd be considering ceramic-coating those headers to reduce heat soak.

 

Is that run in series with the original 'cooler, or as a stand alone unit?

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Those headers ARE ceramic coated, just old and dirty. They are now also wrapped. It's stand alone - I had an RC51/SP1 mounted there, but went even bigger when my custom front mount  radiator couldn't keep up. I've now gone back to a TL1000R rad.

 

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12 minutes ago, keef said:

Those headers ARE ceramic coated, just old and dirty. They are now also wrapped. It's stand alone - I had an RC51/SP1 mounted there, but went even bigger when my custom front mount  radiator couldn't keep up. I've now gone back to a TL1000R rad.

 

Wow, they must be dirty, as they look stock to my (admittedly jaundiced) eye. 

 

Still, coated and wrapped, they'll definitely not be affecting the cooler too badly.

 

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When I mounted the RC51, I had the original lines modded (shortened) by  a local hose shop. 

For the generic aftermarket oil cooler, I had a mate weld AN fittings to the OEM engine fittings, then made up the braided lines.

Sebs idea though, not mine.

Something to remember though, double thick cores are better at high speed, and not so great at low speed. I learnt that with my custom rad.

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10 hours ago, keef said:

When I mounted the RC51, I had the original lines modded (shortened) by  a local hose shop. 

For the generic aftermarket oil cooler, I had a mate weld AN fittings to the OEM engine fittings, then made up the braided lines.

Sebs idea though, not mine.

Something to remember though, double thick cores are better at high speed, and not so great at low speed. I learnt that with my custom rad.

 

Keef, this is good stuff. Thanks for all the info. 

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Brief update - 

 

I haven't had much time to work on the bike, but I managed to make some progress on the clutch master and slave. Fluid drained and slave cylinder pulled:

20180617_115703.jpg?dl=0

 

Not as bad as some, but a bit scuzzy no less. Both seals looked to be in good shape, despite 20 years of service (they were getting replaced regardless). The piston looked a bit janky and needed some clean up:

20180617_115709.jpg?dl=0

 

A bunch of brake cleaner, some polishing, and a fresh gasket and the slave is ready to go back on the bike (I somehow missed adding the larger piston seal to my parts order, it should arrive today). I am also swapping all the bleed nipples over to speed bleeders during this work in an effort to save myself some pain when I refill and bleed the clutch and brakes after this work is completed. 

20180617_131856.jpg?dl=0

 

After this I moved on to the master cylinder... a bit chunky in the bottom:

20180617_132052.jpg?dl=0

 

After a good clean out:

20180617_140913.jpg?dl=0

 

I also replaced the piston set (sorry no pics, I was short on time). I pulled what I assume to be the original piston and master cylinder seals, and they looked to be in serviceable condition. I think I could've saved the money and reused these parts for now, but who knows how many more years they had in them. At least now I know I am good for another 20 years (given proper maintenance and fluid changes). At this point I've reinstalled the master and run the new Goodridge line and I am just waiting on the larger piston seal in order to install the slave cylinder and wet the line. While I had this apart I also pulled the front sprocket cover, cleaned the mank out of that area, checked the chain guide plate to make sure it was in spec still, and installed my new 520 front sprocket. I will snap/add a pic later perhaps. 

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Last night I had a few hours so I dug into the rear brake. I had to start somewhere and since I am keeping my linked brakes (for now) I decided the rear looked a bit easier. No tear down pics (again, feeling a bit pressed for time), but here is the rear caliper after I popped the pistons out:

20180621_180221.jpg?dl=0

 

The pistons actuated by the rear pedal were cleaner than the center piston area. The fluid was slightly less burnt looking and I suspect the rear master has been flushed more often than the front link. The pistons and seals are in good shape and only needed a wee bit of cleaning and polishing:

20180621_180253.jpg?dl=0

 

I ran through the cleanup of the pistons and caliper quickly and then reassembled it to get it ready to go back on the bike. Everything went back together buttery smooth. Note the new speed bleeder nipples.

20180621_183849.jpg?dl=0

 

I remounted the caliper, installed the pads, and ran the new lines. Some general thoughts: The fluid was clearly old, burnt looking and in dire need of a full flush. There wasn't much crystallization or solids present, something I was pleased to find. I had been second guessing not ordering new piston seals and pistons, but based on what I found, I don't think it was remotely necessary. My plan for this weekend is to finish the brake line install, master cylinders (all 3), and caliper clean up. 

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adkfinn, I found that trying to vacuum in new fluid with speed bleeders installed was a tough challenge, although it did help to have the vacuum line, it still required that I press the pedal or pull the lever to open the check valve. Perhaps it was due to the Mity-vac not having enough vacuum pull to open the check valve or something else but just thought you might like to know. On my last flush fill, prior to installing the speed bleeders, I used the OEM and Mity-vac to get the lines filled and then put the speed bleeder on, then bled the lines. It worked out better that way for me.

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49 minutes ago, Duc2V4 said:

adkfinn, I found that trying to vacuum in new fluid with speed bleeders installed was a tough challenge, although it did help to have the vacuum line, it still required that I press the pedal or pull the lever to open the check valve. Perhaps it was due to the Mity-vac not having enough vacuum pull to open the check valve or something else but just thought you might like to know. On my last flush fill, prior to installing the speed bleeders, I used the OEM and Mity-vac to get the lines filled and then put the speed bleeder on, then bled the lines. It worked out better that way for me.

 

Good to know Duc, thank you. I haven't trashed any of the clutch/brake parts I've pulled off the bike yet and have been bagging the stock bleed nipples. If worse comes to worse I guess I could pop them back on (fingers crossed it won't come to that). I am not opposed to pumping via the lever to refill the system, but thought that at least the speed bleeders would ensure I don't back flush any air while doing so. I am hoping that eliminating risk at the slave/caliper ends will allow me to just focus on the masters. We shall see.

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You generally do not split the calipers when servicing them.  Were there any gaskets or o-rings to be replaced?

 

Ciao,

 

 

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3 hours ago, JZH said:

You generally do not split the calipers when servicing them.  Were there any gaskets or o-rings to be replaced?

 

Ciao,

 

 

 

Good to know JZH. There were no gaskets or o-rings, just pull the three bolts holding the caliper together and voila. I only did this because it seemed like there wasn't enough room/clearance for the outside pistons to be removed without doing it. The factory parts fiche doesn't indicate that anything was missing from my calipers, fwiw. 

 

https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/1998/vfr800fi-a-interceptor/rear-brake-caliper

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Question time: What tool are you all using to pull/install wheel bearings on these bikes?

 

Reason - After tearing into the rear hub, it is apparent I need to replace the bearings. They are notchy and don't turn as easy as they should, so now replacing all the bearings has been added to the 'to-do' list. I ordered Honda parts (it looks like others have had decent results from All Balls and other third parties, but I stuck with factory). While I wait on parts to arrive I need to get my hands on a decent bearing puller set. What do you have that works well? All suggestions are appreciated. 

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1 hour ago, adkfinn said:

Question time: What tool are you all using to pull/install wheel bearings on these bikes?

 

Reason - After tearing into the rear hub, it is apparent I need to replace the bearings. They are notchy and don't turn as easy as they should, so now replacing all the bearings has been added to the 'to-do' list. I ordered Honda parts (it looks like others have had decent results from All Balls and other third parties, but I stuck with factory). While I wait on parts to arrive I need to get my hands on a decent bearing puller set. What do you have that works well? All suggestions are appreciated. 

For front wheel bearings I have a Harbor Freight bilnd bearing puller and it works just fine. However, the rear hub might need something different, due to the larger ID of those bearings, well at least the HF kit doesn’t go that large if I recall correctly. The HF kit uses a slide hammer as the means of extraction but there are kits that have adjustable ID “claws” and a screw type extraction method. This type of puller is a bit more cumbersome to setup but works really well for bearings like the rear hub. Either type of puller should be rentable at an auto parts store.

 

Oops, almost forgot, installing the front wheel I have a HF kit for that too but for the rear, a bearing press or home made version of one would probably be better/easier. When sfdownhill and I were working on his swingarm, since I didn’t have the right tool for removing the rear hub bearing, we took it to the local Honda shop to have them removed and installed. Don’t recall what he ended up paying but can say it was a hell of a lot cheaper than what potential damage we could have done to the swingarm, had we tried to “hack it”.

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33 minutes ago, Duc2V4 said:

For front wheel bearings I have a Harbor Freight bilnd bearing puller and it works just fine. However, the rear hub might need something different, due to the larger ID of those bearings, well at least the HF kit doesn’t go that large if I recall correctly. The HF kit uses a slide hammer as the means of extraction but there are kits that have adjustable ID “claws” and a screw type extraction method. This type of puller is a bit more cumbersome to setup but works really well for bearings like the rear hub. Either type of puller should be rentable at an auto parts store.

 

Oops, almost forgot, installing the front wheel I have a HF kit for that too but for the rear, a bearing press or home made version of one would probably be better/easier. When sfdownhill and I were working on his swingarm, since I didn’t have the right tool for removing the rear hub bearing, we took it to the local Honda shop to have them removed and installed. Don’t recall what he ended up paying but can say it was a hell of a lot cheaper than what potential damage we could have done to the swingarm, had we tried to “hack it”.

 

Thanks Duc. I was looking at generic slide hammer style kits and the like. In general, I am rarely opposed to buying the proper tool for the job (unless it is so expensive and singular in it's use that I can't justify it). I will check out the HF offerings and Amazon to see what I can find. I don't have a press, but will double check to see if my neighbor has a press in his garage. I have used the 'tap it in with a large socket' trick for bearings before with success also. 

 

Edit - Any thoughts on the following:

slide hammer / puller - https://www.amazon.com/OTC-4579-9-Way-Hammer-Puller/dp/B0015DMNIS/ref=sr_1_19?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1529854332&sr=1-19&keywords=bearing+puller

 

bolt/press style - https://www.amazon.com/OrionMotorTech-23-Piece-Adapters-Replacement-Installer/dp/B01FLVOAZI/ref=sr_1_9?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1529854332&sr=1-9&keywords=bearing+puller

 

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2 hours ago, adkfinn said:

 

Thanks Duc. I was looking at generic slide hammer style kits and the like. In general, I am rarely opposed to buying the proper tool for the job (unless it is so expensive and singular in it's use that I can't justify it). I will check out the HF offerings and Amazon to see what I can find. I don't have a press, but will double check to see if my neighbor has a press in his garage. I have used the 'tap it in with a large socket' trick for bearings before with success also. 

 

Edit - Any thoughts on the following:

slide hammer / puller - https://www.amazon.com/OTC-4579-9-Way-Hammer-Puller/dp/B0015DMNIS/ref=sr_1_19?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1529854332&sr=1-19&keywords=bearing+puller

 

bolt/press style - https://www.amazon.com/OrionMotorTech-23-Piece-Adapters-Replacement-Installer/dp/B01FLVOAZI/ref=sr_1_9?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1529854332&sr=1-9&keywords=bearing+puller

 

Both of those kits look like they’d do the job. It also looks like the one in the top link, does the screw type removal, which seems like a really good deal for the cost. The one in the lower link seems to be perfect for the larger size rear hub bearings.

 

I actually made a bearing extraction/insertion tool using a long bolt, some washers, a couple of sockets and some nuts. It was good for removing and installing the swingarm pivot bearings on one of bikes but wasn’t usable more than the few uses. I’m sure if I got some good quality nuts, bolts and washers, it could have withstood a few more uses. Might be harder to find the right size for the rear hub though. 

 

The prices these are listed at seem to be decent and might be worth giving them a try, but before I commit to buying some tools online I like to see if I can find the manual to make sure what I think it will do, is shown in the manual. Not always possible but sometimes careful searching on the internet, you can find the manual. Although not always a fan of HF products, they do often have links to the product manuals on their website, which is cool.

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