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I replaced the clutch plates at approx 95000km because I was finding them to be grabby making a smooth take-off and gear change less perfessional-sounding than I liked. I'm very happy with the result, although I'm sure from a friction standpoint the clutch plates had plenty of life left in them.

 

I fitted a shift star kit when I first got the VFR as coming from a Suzuki I found the gearbox pretty agricultural. I was really happy with the result and the VFR is a very sweet-shifting bike now. 

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1 hour ago, HighSideNZ said:

I've got a Sigma slipper clutch in mine, as well as the shift kit and both are great.

I do not believe either are going to help with the clunky shift.

 

Oil is the main culprit to this.

If it hold on to the clutch plates then the gear change is going to clunk.

 

Try different oils until you find one that doesn't do it so bad.

 

Down here I'm using Penrite 10W-40 Synthetic PAO Ester and so far that is the best I've found.

 

+1 Syn PAO ester

I put penrite 5w-40 Syn PAO ester in the cbr1k and gear changes are smoooooth

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2 hours ago, boOZZIE said:

+1 Syn PAO ester

I put penrite 5w-40 Syn PAO ester in the cbr1k and gear changes are smoooooth

It should for 75 bucks a gallon. 

Joel

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2 hours ago, exwifeschewtoy said:

It should for 75 bucks a gallon. 

Joel

Hi Joel.

Agree with boOZZIE the Penrite 5w-40 MC4-ST is an excellent full Synthetic Motorcycle Oil (assume you can get it in the States?). Its something you could try after replacing chain and sprockets if that doesn't cure your "clunking" issues.

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11 hours ago, exwifeschewtoy said:

I did the front brakes and bled the interlinked system , which is good because the fluid in some of the lines was as dark as Pepsi.  Even with messing with my bike a lot I still manage to ride a couple of hours per day.  

 

Joel

Assume you also cleaned the clutch Master Cylinder and bled the clutch system?

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9 hours ago, exwifeschewtoy said:

It should for 75 bucks a gallon. 

Joel

Seriously?!

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MOTUL 5100 10-40

Like Eur 30 for 4 litres

semi-dino

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Don't forget there are exchange rate differences between AU$, US$ and NZ$

$75 in our currency is a shit load less in US$

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17 hours ago, Grum said:

Assume you also cleaned the clutch Master Cylinder and bled the clutch system?

yes, I cleaned it and bleed it until It was clear and then pumped the handle until all the microscopic bubbles stopped appearing. Topped it off and then replaced the stripped screws on the lid with steel screws. 

thanks

Joel

 

I am not gonna spend $75 on oil though. Unless it can dance. 

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10 hours ago, FJ12Ryder said:

Seriously?!

Yeah, actually I don't even want to talk about oil anymore on this site. It brings out the ugly in people. I am sure that I will get better shifting in time.  I am consciously thinking about shifting now so when I have ridden enough to do it without thinking It will probably be fine. 

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55 minutes ago, exwifeschewtoy said:

yes, I cleaned it and bleed it until It was clear and then pumped the handle until all the microscopic bubbles stopped appearing. Topped it off and then replaced the stripped screws on the lid with steel screws. 

thanks

Joel

 

I am not gonna spend $75 on oil though. Unless it can dance. 

Excellent. Good luck with the chain and sprocket replacement, I'm sure that will make a big difference. Let's know how it goes.

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On 5/21/2018 at 9:42 PM, exwifeschewtoy said:

Actually I can't afford a slipper clutch. The idea sounded real nice about it controlling the engine braking better but I got major sticker shock when I found they were over a grand. I am not going to do the shift star either. I can live with the clunk. It doesn't sound like it is hurting the bike which was my main concern. I am going to open the clutch to take a look see. Never know the previous owner may have scorched the plates up. Chances are it is fine but if it needs something no big deal. Like I said, I like to tinker. I don't give you guys crap for trying to make this big pig of a bike lighter and lighter. Which to me is funny. I mean to me, those guys should have just bought a cbr1000rr and put risers on it.....if they wanted a light touring bike. It is only costing me $17 bucks for a gasket to open it up and take a peek. Not worth razzing me about. 

thanks

Joel

 

No one is razzing you my friend... we are just trying to help.

I totally get wrenching as therapy... it works for me too.

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Joel,

Regarding the clunk into 1st gear, I find if I rock the bike forward a bit, really just a few inches, and then click it into 1st, the clunking is reduced.

I read somewhere that its the stacked design of a motorcycle transmission that is responsible for this (?), but I'm no engineer and I never read up on it more to understand what causes this.

 

As for shifting, even at low speeds, think of it more as an art than a science.  Its not Step 1: Let off gas, Step 2: pull clutch lever, Step 3: shift gear.

There is overlap in all 3 steps.

Its more about finding and knowing the sweet spot for your shift points depending on the speed, engine speed, etc.

Eventually you get to the point where you can feel the engine and tranny speeds matching and you just know thats the smoothest shift point.

 

You've heard guys on here talking about clutchless up-shifts.  Its all about finding that sweet spot.

I remember as a kid I broke the clutch lever bracket on my dirt bike, but was able to ride the rest of the day, clutchless up-shifts and down-shifts.  The downshifts can be downright brutal at times, second only to starts going from Neutral to 1st with no clutch.

 

Good luck,

Paul in SoCal

 

 

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The first gear clunk is due to the clutch inner and outer spinning together when the bike is in neutral. When you engage first at a standstill, the clutch inner stops spinning as the gear is engaged (the clutch outer is permanently geared to the crankshaft so always spins), so that will produce some driveline shock. If the engine is cold the clutch plates are all stuck together with a cold film of oil and so the clunk is more pronounced when  cold than when the oil is hot. 

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When bikes still had kick start we used to kick the bike through with the clutch in and the bike in gear

to break the plates free.

 

FWIW if my '99 is warm and I pull the clutch and wait a few seconds, I can put it in first gear with just

a snick, no noise at all. If I rush it I'll get a bit of a clunk, but not really severe.

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9 hours ago, otmaximus said:

Joel,

Regarding the clunk into 1st gear, I find if I rock the bike forward a bit, really just a few inches, and then click it into 1st, the clunking is reduced.

I read somewhere that its the stacked design of a motorcycle transmission that is responsible for this (?), but I'm no engineer and I never read up on it more to understand what causes this.

 

As for shifting, even at low speeds, think of it more as an art than a science.  Its not Step 1: Let off gas, Step 2: pull clutch lever, Step 3: shift gear.

There is overlap in all 3 steps.

Its more about finding and knowing the sweet spot for your shift points depending on the speed, engine speed, etc.

Eventually you get to the point where you can feel the engine and tranny speeds matching and you just know thats the smoothest shift point.

 

You've heard guys on here talking about clutchless up-shifts.  Its all about finding that sweet spot.

I remember as a kid I broke the clutch lever bracket on my dirt bike, but was able to ride the rest of the day, clutchless up-shifts and down-shifts.  The downshifts can be downright brutal at times, second only to starts going from Neutral to 1st with no clutch.

 

Good luck,

Paul in SoCal

 

 

I put on MDZ chinese blue colored shorty adjustable levers yesterday. I know my bike is red.....I like the contrast.  I set the clutch lever closer to the bars so I can prevent myself from pulling past the friction zone. So when I shift I roll off the throttle about 1/4-1/2 inch, depending on engine rpm's, at the same time I am pulling in the clutch most of the way, while I am lightly touching the shifter with my toes. When the clutch is in and the throttle rolled off,  I firmly click my toes up and roll on the throttle while I release the clutch. The faster I am going the faster I twitch the throttle and release the clutch.  I suck at doing it at low rpm's right now so that is what I am going to do. Go out and practice riding around town shifting before 4k rpm's. I am guessing I will need to be slower on the throttle roll and slower on the clutch release to have smoother shifting at those decreased speeds. I am well aware that I am going into a clunking nightmare until I get better at it so I won't get discouraged.  

If I am off in my thinking please set me straight as I don't want to keep practicing something that is wrong. 

thanks

Joel

 

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"pulling past the friction zone"? What does that mean? I have my clutch set so it is fully engaged as far from the handlebars

as possible. The more lever travel, the more clutch plate travel, the more the clutch plates will free up, and lead to clunkless

shifts.

 

For just toodling around shift it just like your car: back off the throttle, pull the clutch, shift to the next gear, match engine revs,

and let the clutch out at a good speed to limit slippage. Practice makes perfect, or at least less crappy. 🙂

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2 hours ago, FJ12Ryder said:

"pulling past the friction zone"? What does that mean? I have my clutch set so it is fully engaged as far from the handlebars

as possible. The more lever travel, the more clutch plate travel, the more the clutch plates will free up, and lead to clunkless

shifts.

 

For just toodling around shift it just like your car: back off the throttle, pull the clutch, shift to the next gear, match engine revs,

and let the clutch out at a good speed to limit slippage. Practice makes perfect, or at least less crappy. 🙂

I may not be using the correct terminology. I mean after the clutch is fully engaged, my understanding was that the rest of the lever pull was dead space..... The stock lever is pretty far from the bars, My clutch is fully engaged half that distance. I was originally pulling in the clutch all or most of the way which was making it harder for me to synch my throttle with. Now I set my new levers so that my clutch can't travel as far.  My clutch is fully engaged with my clutch about an inch, inch and a half from the bars.  It is helping my timing of shifting. I thought that was an ideal set up especially for my tendency to pull in the lever too far.....am I wrong?

I seem to be shifting a whole lot better anyway. 

thanks

Joel

 

 

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If you don't get enough travel you'll find your shifting harder, and "clunkier" when shifting slowly. IMO the clutch

should engage as far from the handlebar as possible, but not so far that it isn't fully engaging. Having the clutch

engage very close to the bar means your clutch plates may not be releasing fully. That's not a bad thing when

shifting very quickly since then you just need to unload the gears, and backing the engine off a touch will do that.

 

When you're shifting slowly and easily like in town stop-and-go traffic, you need all the travel you can get. Setting

the clutch to engage close to the bar does you, and your clutch, no favors.

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7 minutes ago, FJ12Ryder said:

If you don't get enough travel you'll find your shifting harder, and "clunkier" when shifting slowly. IMO the clutch

should engage as far from the handlebar as possible, but not so far that it isn't fully engaging. Having the clutch

engage very close to the bar means your clutch plates may not be releasing fully. That's not a bad thing when

shifting very quickly since then you just need to unload the gears, and backing the engine off a touch will do that.

 

When you're shifting slowly and easily like in town stop-and-go traffic, you need all the travel you can get. Setting

the clutch to engage close to the bar does you, and your clutch, no favors.

ok, I will adjust it so that it has more travel. 

thanks for helping me understand. 

Joel

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Think about it like if you only pushed your car's clutch pedal in half-way or less. Works the same way.

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If in neutral stopped at a light, before kicking into 1st, blip the throttle, as the reeves are coming back down slip it into 1st. i do this out of habit, i guess because it works. it will also help with downshifts and the slipper clutch need. You can blip the throttle to match the revs of your downshift.     

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1 hour ago, gig said:

If in neutral stopped at a light, before kicking into 1st, blip the throttle, as the reeves are coming back down slip it into 1st. i do this out of habit, i guess because it works. it will also help with downshifts and the slipper clutch need. You can blip the throttle to match the revs of your downshift.     

Are you sure you're not an ex-Harley rider, with that blipping the throttle thing. 🙂 If I pull in the clutch, I sit at the light in neutral usually yeah I know bad boy,

for about 5 seconds or a little less the bike will slip right into gear with no clunking or noise of any kind. The clutch should free up enough to allow the bike

to be put into gear with no noise, if it's warmed up.

 

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Regarding shifting into first at a stop: I find if I wait to shift down to first gear as I approch an anticipated stop until about 2 - 4 mph I get into first gear without a clunk.

 

(That technique will require holding the clutch lever in while you wait to get moving again; this is a technique taught in MSF rider training courses so that you can move right away if some is approching from behind and threatening to rear-end you.)

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21 hours ago, FJ12Ryder said:

Are you sure you're not an ex-Harley rider, with that blipping the throttle thing. 🙂 If I pull in the clutch, I sit at the light in neutral usually yeah I know bad boy,

for about 5 seconds or a little less the bike will slip right into gear with no clunking or noise of any kind. The clutch should free up enough to allow the bike

to be put into gear with no noise, if it's warmed up.

 

Lol. You most likely coast through corners at idle. or maybe you back it in like Marquez. If I'm downshifting, and want to be in a good gear to exit a corner with some RPM, i have to blip the throttle. 

I think i do it from neutral because it helps to slip it into first, but maybe a bad boy habit. I'm curious to test it now, and will let you know.

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