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Normand

Tires again !!

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Dustin you are so right, the manufactures are ass covering,

I recall my FJR 1300 had 36psi rear one up and 42psi two up in the manual.  My Honda is 42psi no mention of one or two or load nothing!

Guess what pressure's is written on the tyre, u guessed it 42. 

 

Surely even the village idiot would understand that round black thing that your life relies on has to have pressure in it to carry the required load and also reach a temperature that allows it to grip the road as the manufacture intended!!!!!!!!!!!  Well u can't put brains into statues 😳

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My usual ride is 15 miles on Oahu’s crater sized pothole roadways where I doubt I see 60 mph for more than a few seconds, but have never thought but to inflate 36F/42R.  Any suggestions?

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My usual ride is 15 miles on Oahu’s crater sized pothole roadways where I doubt I see 60 mph for more than a few seconds, but have never thought but to inflate 36F/42R.  Any suggestions?

36/42 is the recommended pressure and is definitely not going to be an issue.

 

I start there and adjust based on feel, outside temperature and load. Different tires are better with different pressures for me. My current Bridgestone S21 are perfect at 34/40 but I will bump it to 36/42 for carrying a passenger. I may run a tire with a softer carcass at only 36/42, like the Avon hypersports I ran a few years ago. A rigid/hard tire like a Dunlop Roadsmart II always works best for me with 32 front, 38 rear.

 

Your mileage may vary!

 

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My back ground is over dimensional and over mass vehicles, trust me tyres/tires for eg. 26000kg/57000lbs on 8 wheels were a massive cost, so load and pressures consumed my mind set because the dollars are big if you stuff up..and no wheel set ran the same pressures because the loads were not equal.

 

Now to reiterate, my rear for example is a 190/55x17 and on the side wall the manufacture clearly states if you are going to carry 387kg's/853lbs you must inflate to 42psi.  Now in my case my motorcycle has two wheels so unless I get my 260kg/573lb bike plus my 85kg's/188lb fat person on the rear wheel only that makes 345kg's/760lb so I still have not reached the recommended load to have 42psi in the tire. So now we understand the pressure for the load, and we are always keeping in mind aren't we that the tire is also part of the suspension system for the bike because it contains air which compresses under load!  Personally I like to have a comfortable ride rather than the crap flogged out of me because I have way over pressured my tires.  So if one thinks 42psi (as in my case one up) is correct pressure I would say get of the drugs and seek professional help.

 

Now in my 190/55 it likes 33psi and hot it gets to 37psi, and here in summer if it is really stinking hot (35c/95f and more) I may need 36psi. The tire has a nice wear pattern from edge to edge so is working well.  What is also helpful is the front is almost the same in pressures.  Now what must be stated a friend with the same bike at 33psi always struggles to get a 4psi change because he rides more conservatively and is never able to get to the edge of the tire.  Chicken strip I think its called! :-)... Cheers

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4 hours ago, weven said:

So if one thinks 42psi (as in my case one up) is correct pressure I would say get of the drugs and seek professional help.

 

But it is the standard recommended rear pressure for most bikes these days. As far as I'm concerned, 36F/42R should be where people start and then adjust based on their preferences. This is especially important when asking for advice online as this is a worldwide community with people in completely different climates, on different road surfaces, different skill levels, different sizes & shapes and different uses. 

 

A 300 lb dude in Florida who only goes up and down the highway at 90 mph certainly shouldn't be running the same tire pressures as somebody 170 lbs carving up the Alps in autumn.

 

It's my opinion that the manufacturer recommended 36/42 offers a broad compromise between stability, responsiveness, handling, tire life and ride comfort for most people in most situations on most tires.

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36f/42r is absolutely perfect for both me and my wife. So hey, I guess I need to lay off the drugs and seek professional help since I run 42r. My tires get good mileage and grip is fantastic, but hey, we're loonies!

 

It's a great starting point. Dial it in from there.

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Correct Dustin, start at 42psi rear if you are carrying  387kg's/853lbs that is why the people that made the tire went to all the trouble to put it on the side wall because that is the pressure required for that load.  Personally my VFR1200 never carries that load so I cannot run 42psi because it would be over inflated wouldn't it. 

 

How ever if I had a FULL Top Box, Panniers, and a Pillion at 100kg/220lb sitting over the rear tire 42psi would be required and that is why the people that made the tire and the Motorcycle manufacture that fitted that size rim to take a 190/55 recommend 42psi because when people don't pressure the tire to its Load Rating and (I have ridden with plenty of those over the last forty years) then crash because the tire over heats and fails because it is under inflated you've got no hope re Litigation..

 

My only reason for my first post was to give people the benefit of my years of motor cycling experience and having worked in the tire game.  A simple general rule no matter what your riding style/type is 2-4psi (for me 3-4) from cold will always work and always has done.  Personally my favorite tire after many years of trail and error and trust me I have tried them all is Bridgetone starting with Bt023, S20, S20evo, S21, and now the T31 because as stated earlier I wear the front tire out to quickly, so time will tell.

 

I will try to attach a file from Bridgestone for tires for track day use, interesting reading.  The most relevant for me is the T30 190/55 (2.2bar=32psi) and funny enough the pressure's I use for road use are only slightly higher due to higher temp's generated on a track thus more pressure rise. Hope this helps...

Bridgestone Tyre Pressures.pdf

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My S21 rear states maximum 508 lbs at 42 PSI cold. If you consider my 550 lb bike, 200 lb me with gear and 20 lbs of luggage, that's 770 lbs going down the road. If you factor a static 50/50 weight distribution, that's still 385 lbs on the rear tire without any forces acting on it. Even shifting 15% to the rear through acceleration would bring you close to the maximum.

 

Maybe I'm mistaken but the recommendation of 36F/42R seems very reasonable for regular, every day street use.

 

 

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Dustin is your standard rear a 180/55 ZR 17 M/C (73W) TL ??

Why I ask the 73W load rating is 805lbs @ 42psi

Pleased to see your BS man, I thought the S21 were great but the heavy 1200 used the front tyre to quickly so I thought I would try a more Touring type tyre.

T31..........

Cheers

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On 11/10/2018 at 1:17 AM, weven said:

My back ground is over dimensional and over mass vehicles, trust me tyres/tires for eg. 26000kg/57000lbs on 8 wheels were a massive cost, so load and pressures consumed my mind set because the dollars are big if you stuff up..and no wheel set ran the same pressures because the loads were not equal.

 

Now to reiterate, my rear for example is a 190/55x17 and on the side wall the manufacture clearly states if you are going to carry 387kg's/853lbs you must inflate to 42psi.  Now in my case my motorcycle has two wheels so unless I get my 260kg/573lb bike plus my 85kg's/188lb fat person on the rear wheel only that makes 345kg's/760lb so I still have not reached the recommended load to have 42psi in the tire. So now we understand the pressure for the load, and we are always keeping in mind aren't we that the tire is also part of the suspension system for the bike because it contains air which compresses under load!  Personally I like to have a comfortable ride rather than the crap flogged out of me because I have way over pressured my tires.  So if one thinks 42psi (as in my case one up) is correct pressure I would say get of the drugs and seek professional help.

 

Now in my 190/55 it likes 33psi and hot it gets to 37psi, and here in summer if it is really stinking hot (35c/95f and more) I may need 36psi. The tire has a nice wear pattern from edge to edge so is working well.  What is also helpful is the front is almost the same in pressures.  Now what must be stated a friend with the same bike at 33psi always struggles to get a 4psi change because he rides more conservatively and is never able to get to the edge of the tire.  Chicken strip I think its called! :-)... Cheers

 

Of course I run different pressures on my rear dually, sometime even left to right and of course load, but till you mentioned it, I’ve never thought about my bike tires.  I’ll try your 37psi as a baseline.  Mahalo.

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Andy start at 37 ride 15 miles or there about preferably some nice bend carving and work the tyre then look for a 3-4psi increase. 

 

As an example temp here Saturday about 27c started at 32psi rear, rode 20k's on a twisty rough road, checked, my increase was 3.5 psi continued for another 120k's checked again at home was 4psi, I'm happy with that. Cheers.............. 😎 Be mindful different brand's different pressure change, mine Bridgestone T31.

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Interesting to me that my Multistrada sets 42 rear as a maximum in the owner's manual, giving a range based on weight. First time I've seen this.

 

 

fullsizeoutput_10ce.jpeg

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