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blackmax

Angled Valve Stems

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Has anyone changed their valve stems to the angled metal ones? If so what kind did you put on and what size are they? I'm replacing my tires and now is the time to change the valve stems.

 

Thanks

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I have installed angled valve stems on my current ride. They make it quite easy to check and adjust pressure. I believe I paid ~$25 for a pair. They are not 90 degree angle. Although I'm not positive of the exact angle they are between straight up and down and 90 degrees. They are all metal with metal caps, all black.  

I cannot remember where I bought them from there are many sources as a result of "angled valve stems for motorcycles" on the web.

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I had one installed on my rear wheel a few weeks ago when I had a tire put on at Cycle Gear. They just grabbed one off the rack and it worked, so I don't know what size. I can go and dig the package with the other stem for my front out of my toolbox if it would help you. It was a 90 degree.


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I'm tuning in to this thread... 

 

I'm also looking for a 90 degree. I have the tire pressure sensors that link to my Zumo but the rear wheel on the gen8 it will hit the brake caliper with the straight stem. :mad:

 

 

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41d496459f216247dd2007a35f5b3120.jpg

Coming from Cycle Gear, they're likely Chinese. The price tag ($19.99) says "11.3mm" on it. It does have a metal cap that I didn't notice, that's something I'll have to remedy next time I go to the store.


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1 hour ago, jhenley17 said:

41d496459f216247dd2007a35f5b3120.jpg

Coming from Cycle Gear, they're likely Chinese. The price tag ($19.99) says "11.3mm" on it. It does have a metal cap that I didn't notice, that's something I'll have to remedy next time I go to the store.


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Thanks for checking. They look ok.

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3 hours ago, blackmax said:

I would like to know the brand and size........ I know I don't want one that was made in China.

I would imagine you'll play hell trying to find any not made in China. I bought mine from

KurvyGirl and they were around $30 for two of them. I wouldn't be without them.

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My advice would be to look for stems that have the fixed seal on the inside of the wheel, which screw on from the outside.

That way if anything was to backout, it's a much easier fix.

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Although the first set of valve stems I got from Kurvey Girl, I have found that there are many places that have the same for much less. Amazon is a good place to look if you are just looking for least expensive option. I can say that there are plenty of alternatives to paying $30 a set. #themoreyouknow

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Yeah but you do not get that nice Kurvey Girl decal then..... :goofy:

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My local and good independent cycle shop won't sell angled valve stems or put them on a bike.  I can see where they're coming from if you think about it.  Angled stems don't even make my list of what to be concerned about.  

 

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Each to his own I guess.

For me the benefits far outweigh any theoretical/perceived risk.  

 

Aircompressor's "snouts" at petrol stations (in EU at least) are all designed/angled for cars. 

Sure one can bend the "traditional" rubber mc valve sideways, but if that is "good"is a matter of opinion (too) I guess... 

 

 

 

Bought a set once at the Nurburgring; it came with a free "hope and grope":goofy:

IMG_1983.thumb.jpg.5e1560ce76e0adb09614844d77238126.jpg

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I put the KurveyGirl 83 degree valve stems on all my bikes.  They have been solid and work well.

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I've got these on 5 of my bikes and installed them on 4 friends bikes.

 

10mm thread, 11.2mm at the rubber sealing gasket, the body is aluminum.. A drop of blue Loctite on the threads when installing. 

 

Never had a problem with them. $3 each on e bay.

 

You can find similar in chrome or brass for about the same cost if you prefer not to use aluminum.

DSCF3278.JPG

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My understanding is that the ones that Kurvey Girl sells are Bridgeport. There are others by K&L and some knock offs, so there are choices. My recollection is that the ones I got from Nomar a while back are Bridgeport and cost $4.95 ea., they have gone up to $6.95 ea. now, so just about half price for a set. K&L seem to be a bit less expensive and are found at quite a few Moto outlets like Dennis Kirk, J&P cycles (Formerly Motorcycle Super Store), Rocky Mountain ATV and Bike Bandit, just to name a few. I have a few of these as well and have not had any issues with them and seem to be on par with the Bridgeport ones.

 

Like a lot of things, depends on where you get them, you could pay more for the same item or could pay less for an inferior product but ultimately, searching the web will net you the best price. As for Kurvey Girls stickers Dutchy, I have a few if you want some! Kurvey Girl sells other stuff I bought that they had and I needed so, stickers are a plenty at the moment...

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I put them on all my bikes with the first tyre change. Like Dutchy said, air for tyres at servos (service stations) is much easier. Especially with big 320mm front rotors. 

Generally, Japanese and Italian wheels have different size valves. I can’t remember which is bigger and which is smaller though. 

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All my old, crotchety and cheap biker buddys swear by Kurvey Girl valve stems. Each of our "A Team" has a specialty we share to help with our bikes. Because we go through so many tires we have one guy with a tire changer (and one who can change tires by hand), so installing angled valve stems are SOP. I have them on both my VFR's and my sons Ninja.

 

 

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I dunno. Mine have done 130 so far and at least 85 every day with no noticeable ill effects. What I do anticipate is much easier access for hoses and gauges, and no more scars on my hands from rushing at the gas station to air up the rear(admittedly, nobody's fault but mine, but why not mitigate the hazard?)


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Thanks for all the responses. My other bike with over 170,000 Kms on it and no issues with the 90 degree valve stems. I check my tire pressures every time I go out on a run and if I'm on a multiple day run I check and adjust the tire pressure every morning before leaving the hotel. I just find the factory valve stems very awkward and they must go.

 

I can't wait for riding season to be here!!!!

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21 hours ago, bobbyn said:

All my old, crotchety and cheap biker buddys swear by Kurvey Girl valve stems. Each of our "A Team" has a specialty we share to help with our bikes. Because we go through so many tires we have one guy with a tire changer (and one who can change tires by hand), so installing angled valve stems are SOP. I have them on both my VFR's and my sons Ninja.

 

 

Nice video.  

Would love to see him putting on a set of GT tyres using that method, sports tyres, easy enough to do as have done it myself. 

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On 2/26/2018 at 12:49 PM, Bent said:

My local and good independent cycle shop won't sell angled valve stems or put them on a bike.  I can see where they're coming from if you think about it.  Angled stems don't even make my list of what to be concerned about.  

 

 

Old school, huh?  There used to be a concern about angled valve stems, but it had to do with those old-style rubber-mounted 90-degree stems, not the all-metal Bridgeport-type stems.  The rubber stems can fatigue, leak and fail, but the metal ones cannot.  I've never heard of a Bridgeport stem failing.

 

There are only two stem hole sizes in common use on motorcycles, and the 11.3mm one is the size for Honda wheels.  Ducatis use the smaller diameter stems.

 

Ciao,

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23 hours ago, fink said:

Nice video.  

Would love to see him putting on a set of GT tyres using that method, sports tyres, easy enough to do as have done it myself. 

So far the easiest tires I've had to mount have been Michelins and Pirelli. The Super Corsas took very little effort and one set I didn't even have to use any weights for balancing. Some of the most troublesome I've had to deal with have been Dunlops. One tire I had to break the bead and re-position the tire as it was so out of balance after the first mounting. Took me a while to get it right and even then took a quite a few weights to get it right.

 

As far as the guy in the video, the amount of downward force he uses to get the tire on while it rest on the rotor made me cringe. I was also half expecting the bead to pop when he had the tire resting against the mirror and cracking it. The two things I found that make a difference in mounting is heat and lubrication. Nothing worse than trying to mount a cold tire and without any lubrication, good luck with that. (I know, that's what she said)

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37 minutes ago, Duc2V4 said:

So far the easiest tires I've had to mount have been Michelins and Pirelli. The Super Corsas took very little effort and one set I didn't even have to use any weights for balancing. Some of the most troublesome I've had to deal with have been Dunlops. One tire I had to break the bead and re-position the tire as it was so out of balance after the first mounting. Took me a while to get it right and even then took a quite a few weights to get it right.

 

As far as the guy in the video, the amount of downward force he uses to get the tire on while it rest on the rotor made me cringe. I was also half expecting the bead to pop when he had the tire resting against the mirror and cracking it. The two things I found that make a difference in mounting is heat and lubrication. Nothing worse than trying to mount a cold tire and without any lubrication, good luck with that. (I know, that's what she said)

I was thinking the same too re rotor and mirror.  Doesn’t get that warm here but loads of lube makes life a lot easier.  The sports tyres have softer sidewalls so are more flexible. 

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